issues2000

Topics in the News: China


Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Dec 23, 2021)
Ban trade from Xinjiang; plus diplomatic boycott of Olympics

President Biden signed a new law banning products made in China's Xinjiang region because of China's oppression of its largely Muslim Uighur minority population. The law imposes a near-blanket ban on the import to the US of goods by requiring suppliers to first prove their products were not made with forced labour. Xinjiang is a large supplier of cotton and solar panels.

UN experts have estimated that more than one million people, mainly Uighurs, have been imprisoned in recent years in a vast system of camps in Xinjiang. The US and many rights groups have called it "genocide".

The US cited the situation in Xinjiang in a decision earlier this month to launch a diplomatic boycott of the upcoming Winter Olympics in Beijing. The Biden administration also imposed trade sanctions last week on several Chinese companies, accusing the government in Beijing of advancing high-tech surveillance on the Uighurs. [See H.R. 6256 for details of bill]

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Al Jazeera "Xinjiang" on 2021 Biden Administration

Xi Jinping on China: (Health Care Nov 13, 2021)
FactCheck: Overcame impact of COVID-19; played down costs

China's top leader has declared that the country has "overcome" the impact of the coronavirus, even as sporadic lockdowns continue in various areas. China's top leader, Xi Jinping, said this week that the country had "overcome the impact of COVID-19." In propaganda messaging from a major party meeting, Communist Party leaders touted the successes of their response in saving lives while playing down the huge social and economic cost of those measures.

OnTheIssues FactCheck: China suffered as the early epicenter of the COVID pandemic in early 2020, but then instituted lockdowns. The US experienced its first infections at that time. By the time of the Delta variant in autumn 2020, China had overcome most infections (with no functional vaccine) while the US experienced millions of active cases. By the time of the Omicron variant in late 2021, even with a functional vaccine, the US experienced even more millions of active cases, while China had few cases.

Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues FactCheck on Economic Times: "Zero COVID"

Xi Jinping on China: (Energy & Oil Nov 11, 2021)
Promote green, low-carbon and sustainable development

We need to promote green transition. A sound eco-environment is the most basic public good that benefits all. We in the Asia-Pacific should make its post-pandemic recovery a green one and take the lead in making a science-based response to climate change. Working together, all of us can embark on a path of green, low-carbon and sustainable development.

China's carbon reduction action is a profound economic and social transformation. However formidable the task may be, we will work tirelessly to make our contribution to promoting global green transition. Our carbon reduction action will also require massive investment, thus creating huge market opportunities and room for cooperation. The business communities across the Asia-Pacific are warmly welcome to join us in this endeavor. Together, we can usher in a future of green development.

Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Global Times on Foreign Influences: "APEC Keynote"

Xi Jinping on China: (Government Reform Nov 11, 2021)
China is strengthening regulation over some sectors

Recently, the competent Chinese government departments are improving and better enforcing anti-monopoly laws and regulations and strengthening regulation over some sectors. This is called for to promote the sound development of the market economy in China. As a matter of fact, it is also a common practice in other countries. We will unswervingly consolidate and develop the public sector.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Global Times on Foreign Influences: "APEC Keynote"

Xi Jinping on China: (Budget & Economy Nov 10, 2021)
Less than 3% of world economy in 1977, more than 17% in 2020

"China should enhance the internal vitality and driving force of economic growth."
-- Xi Jinping in 2012

The government declared it had eliminated "extreme poverty" last year and turned China into a "moderately prosperous society." While critics say the size of China's economy has been overstated, decades of uninterrupted annual growth have propelled it from accounting for less than 3% of the global economy in 1977 to more than 17% last year.

"We must be firm in our resolve to fight against corruption wherever it occurs."
--Xi Jinping in 2013

When Xi took power he launched a vast anti-corruption campaign, punishing deserving officials and businesspeople but also peeling off rivals. More than 4 million officials have since been taken down, including 254 high-ranking ones.

Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: James Mayger, "Decade in Power" in Bloomberg News

Xi Jinping on China: (Social Security Nov 10, 2021)
Improve public services and pensions for older citizens

China's billionaires won't determine the success of Xi's drive to narrow a worrying wealth gap. The country's hundreds of millions of retirees, most of them dependent on penurious pensions, just might. China needs to improve public services that will increasingly be required by the elderly in underserved rural areas, including day centers. Xi's common prosperity push has included visits to just such centers, with comments on the party's responsibility to ensure happy lives for older citizens.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Clara Marques, "Decade in Power" in Bloomberg News

Xi Jinping on China: (Homeland Security Nov 4, 2021)
Defend territorial sovereignty and land border security

China adopted a land border law, which will take effect on January 1, 2022, in an endeavor to strengthen its border control and protection. Through the enactment of this new law, Beijing appears to be signaling determination to resolve the border disputes on its preferred terms. The law sets an overall tone of resolve upfront, stating that China will "resolutely defend territorial sovereignty and land border security" while continuing to seek to settle disputes through negotiations.

To the extent that Beijing sees a close link between reinforcing a "common identity of the Chinese nation" and consolidating control over China's ethnic minority-populated land frontier, modulation in Beijing's current policy toward these regions may not be over the horizon. Beijing could invoke the law to close China's border to prevent the spillover of terrorism and extremism from Central Asia, an influx of refugees from North Korea, Myanmar, or Afghanistan, or the spread of a pandemic.

Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Brookings Institution on Foreign Influences: "Border Law"

Antony Blinken on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 31, 2021)
China's incentive on climate change not being world outlier

Q: What incentive does China have to act right now? They seem to be increasingly an adversary of the United States.

BLINKEN: Well, I think the number one interest is in not being a world outlier. Their own people would benefit dramatically from China taking the necessary steps on climate change. So would the international community. To the extent that China cares about it's -- how it's seen in the world, it also needs to think about stepping up.

Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2021 interview of Secretary of State

Antony Blinken on China: (War & Peace Oct 31, 2021)
US committed to Taiwan being able to defend itself

Q: Will US come to Taiwan's defense if China invades?

BLINKEN: There is no change in our policy. We've had a longstanding commitment pursuant to the Taiwan Relations Act, to make sure that Taiwan has the means to defend itself. And we stand by that. The president stood by that strongly. And we want to make sure that no one takes any unilateral action that would disrupt the status quo with regard to Taiwan. That hasn't changed.

Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2021 interview of U.S. Secretary of State

Xi Jinping on China: (Civil Rights Oct 30, 2021)
Shut down LGBT social media accounts; boycott "sissy idols"

In July, the WeChat accounts of dozens of LGBT student organizations across China were shut down permanently in a move that took the groups by surprise. In September, China's top media regulator announced a boycott of what it called "sissy idols", among other new guidelines, during an ongoing "clean-up" of the entertainment industry. This group includes pop idols who wear make-up or who do not conform to male stereotypes prevalent in traditional Chinese culture.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: South China Morning Post on Foreign Influences: "LGBT"

Xi Jinping on China: (Education Oct 30, 2021)
Give physical education top priority in Chinese schools

With obesity and myopia continuing their unrelenting climb among kids and teens today, China has made it clear that physical education should be given top priority in its ongoing, major education reform intended to shape the next generation of Chinese youth. The commitment was once again on display at a press conference, where the country's top sports authority unveiled a package of measures to encourage physical fitness among schoolchildren.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: SupChina.com blog on Foreign Influences: "Fit children"

Vladimir Putin on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 22, 2021)
We will continue to work with China on a bilateral basis

[On China]: "We will continue to actively work with China on a bilateral basis. allocating the needed resources and creating the conditions for the citizens of our countries to feel safe regardless of what's happening in Afghanistan."
Click for Vladimir Putin on other issues.   Source: The Moscow Times on Foreign Influencers

Xi Jinping on China: (Civil Rights Oct 20, 2021)
Many discriminated against for rural household registration

Some efforts to address inequality will invariably prove inadequate. It may take generations for people across China to recover from the Party's exploitative practices: more than two-thirds of children experience discrimination as a result of having rural household registration. Many of them have little education and poor health. Some are even traumatized as they are "left behind" by parents who flock to cities for work.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Human Rights Watch on Foreign Influences: "Tightening Up"

Xi Jinping on China: (Corporations Oct 2, 2021)
Purge capitalist excess; business must heed state guidance

Xi Jinping is waging a campaign to purge China of capitalist excesses. China's president sees surging debt as the poisonous fruit of financial speculation and billionaires as a mockery of Marxism. Businesses must heed state guidance. The party must permeate every area of national life.

The crackdowns are also making business harder and less rewarding. The party had been creating a regulatory and legal framework, but Mr Xi is imposing big top-down changes so fast that regulation has started to seem arbitrary. Consider, for example, "tertiary redistribution", in which shamed tech companies hand over cash to the state in an attempt to redeem themselves.

Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: The Economist on Foreign Influences: "Rife with Danger"

Xi Jinping on China: (Principles & Values Oct 2, 2021)
Moral review councils use public shaming for enforcement

[On "China's New Reality"]: "Moral review councils" and "moral clinics" are enforcing orthodox behaviour using public shaming. Although there is as yet no prospect of anything as awful as the Cultural Revolution, Chinese people are becoming less free to think and talk. As well as promoting his own doctrines, Mr Xi has played up Red nostalgia and cast Maoism as a vital stage in building a New China, broadening his support before the party congress.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: The Economist on Foreign Influences: "Rife with Danger"

Xi Jinping on China: (Abortion Sep 27, 2021)
Looks to reduce number of abortions & increase birthrate

China announced plans to reduce the number of abortions performed in the country, prompting concerns from some women over the prospect of reduced access to the procedure. The new measures arrive as China is seeking to revive its birthrate. For years, abortion was not only widely available in China, but regularly forced onto women who became pregnant multiple times in violation of the long-standing one-child policy.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Eva Dou, "Reduce Abortions" in Washington Post

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Jun 17, 2021)
FactCheck: 220,000 American cars sold in Europe, not zero

[Regarding the G7 Summit, where President Biden met with the leaders of Germany, France, and other European and Asian economic leaders]:

OTI transcript of Donald Trump's interview with Sean Hannity: "They [the Europeans] screw us on trade. They are in many ways worse than China, or as bad as China, on trade. How many Chevrolets are being sold in Berlin? Not too many. How many Chevrolets are being sold in Paris? Not too many. Maybe none. And yet, we sell their products -- their wines, and their cars, and their Mercedes, and their BMWs -- we sell it all over our country."

CNN Fact Check: Trump was criticizing the lack of reciprocity of certain countries in selling American goods here. But for the record, from what I could find, there were more than 200,000 Chevrolets registered in Germany in 2019. In the first half of the last decade, roughly 20,000 Chevrolets were being sold in France a year. Both of those numbers are larger than "none."

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN Fact-Check on 2022˙elections

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Apr 28, 2021)
Autocrats think democracy can't compete in the 21st century

I spent a lot of time with President Xi [of China]. He's deadly earnest about becoming the most significant, consequential nation in the world. He and others, autocrats, think that democracy can't compete in the 21st century with autocracies because it takes too long to get consensus.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2021 State of the Union address

Joe Biden on China: (Technology Apr 28, 2021)
We have to develop and dominate future technologies

We'll see more technological change in the next 10 years than we saw in the last 50. And we're falling behind the competition with the rest of the world. Decades ago, we used to invest 2% of our gross domestic product in research and development. Today, that's less than 1%. China and other countries are closing in fast. We have to develop and dominate the products and technologies of the future, the advanced batteries, biotechnology, computer chips, clean energy.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2021 State of the Union address

Antony Blinken on China: (Foreign Policy Apr 1, 2021)
No special treatment for Hong Kong due to China's actions

Hong Kong does not warrant preferential treatment under US law owing to the erosion of its autonomy at the hands of Beijing, the Biden administration said, upholding a Trump-era determination made last year. "Over the past year, the People's Republic of China has continued to dismantle Hong Kong's high degree of autonomy, in violation of its obligations under the Sino-British Joint Declaration and Hong Kong's Basic Law," Blinken said.
Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: South China Morning Post on 2021 Biden Administration

Antony Blinken on China: (Foreign Policy Apr 1, 2021)
With Japan on checking North Korea & China aggression

I think one of the things that the United States and Japan both see is that China is acting both more aggressively at home and more aggressively abroad. It's important for us to make clear that China cannot expect us to allow it to act with impunity. We have a real stake in this because this is about making sure that we maintain a peaceful stable environment. It is about making sure that things that really matter to us, like freedom of navigation, freedom of commerce, is sustained.

We've actually had trilateral conversations with Japan and South Korea about North Korea, and we have a strong shared common interest in dealing with the challenge posed by North Korea's nuclear programs, missile programs, and human rights abuses. I think all three countries found benefit in that. So at the end of the day, I think that we each will find that it's in our respective interests to pursue that [trilateral] cooperation, and I'm confident we'll be able to do that.

Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: Japan Forward interview: on 2021 Biden Administration

Antony Blinken on China: (Health Care Apr 1, 2021)
Don't tie access to COVID vaccines to geopolitics

Various countries, including China, have been engaged in so-called vaccine diplomacy. Of course, sometimes this diplomacy comes with strings attached, and certain requests are made. I think that's deeply unfortunate because we shouldn't tie the distribution or access to vaccines to politics or to geopolitics. This needs to be done by everyone who's able to do it, because it's in the overall interest of humanity.
Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: Japan Forward interview: on 2021 Biden Administration

Bill Nelson on China: (Technology Mar 18, 2021)
Cutting NASA budget could cause US to fall behind in space

After then-President Barack Obama moved to slash funding for NASA's moon mission program in 2010, Nelson told CNN the decision could cause the US to fall behind other countries in space exploration. "If they don't push hard now for research and development of the new big rocket that'll take us out of low-Earth orbit and let us explore the heavens, then we are going to be falling behind China and Russia, and that's something I don't think will sit well with the American people."
Click for Bill Nelson on other issues.   Source: CNN.com on 2021 Biden Transition

Lloyd Austin on China: (Foreign Policy Mar 4, 2021)
Prioritize China as number one pacing challenge

The Department will prioritize China as our number one pacing challenge and develop the right operational concepts, capabilities, and plans to bolster deterrence and maintain our competitive advantage. We will ensure that our approach toward China is coordinated and synchronized to advance our priorities, integrated into domestic and foreign policy in a whole-of-government strategy, strengthened by our alliances and partnerships, and supported on a bipartisan basis in Congress.
Click for Lloyd Austin on other issues.   Source: USNI News on 2021 Biden Administration

Lloyd Austin on China: (Homeland Security Mar 4, 2021)
Ready to respond to threats, imposing costs where necessary

Even as we address China, we will ensure that we remain fully ready to respond to and effectively deter threats emanating from Russia, Iran, and North Korea, and disrupt transnational and non-state actor threats from violent extremist organizations, such as those operating in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. We will seek to impose cost where necessary, while using all of our tools to lower the risk of escalation with our adversaries and respond to challenges below the level of armed conflict.

The Department will innovate at a speed and scale that matches a dynamic threat landscape. This will require advances in our joint warfighting concepts and a commitment to rapid experimentation and fielding of capabilities. Where necessary, we will divest of legacy systems and programs that no longer meet our security needs, while investing smartly for the future. In turn, we will improve the efficiency of the force and guarantee freedom of action in contested, complex operating environments.

Click for Lloyd Austin on other issues.   Source: USNI News on 2021 Biden Administration

Antony Blinken on China: (Foreign Policy Mar 3, 2021)
We must engage China from a position of strength

We will manage the biggest geopolitical test of the 21st century: our relationship with China.

China is the only country with the economic, diplomatic, military, and technological power to seriously challenge the stable and open international system. Our relationship with China will be competitive when it should be, collaborative when it can be, and adversarial when it must be. The common denominator is the need to engage China from a position of strength.

Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: State Department speech: 2021 Biden Administration

Lloyd Austin on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 5, 2021)
China most significant challenge going forward

During his confirmation hearing, Austin called China "the most significant challenge going forward," adding that Russia, though "in decline," was also a challenge.
Click for Lloyd Austin on other issues.   Source: CNN, "Pentagon Chief," on Biden Cabinet

Antony Blinken on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 5, 2021)
Presses China on human rights; condemning Burma coup

Blinken spoke with People's Republic of China Director of the Office of the Central Commission for Foreign Affairs Yang Jiechi and extended his best wishes for the Lunar New Year. Secretary Blinken stressed the United States will continue to stand up for human rights and democratic values, including in Xinjiang, Tibet, and Hong Kong, and pressed China to join the international community in condemning the military coup in Burma.
Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: Biden Administration Press Release from state.gov

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 4, 2021)
Meet advancing authoritarianism, including China & Russia

We will repair our alliances and engage with the world once again, not to meet yesterday's challenges, but today's and tomorrow's. American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States and the determination of Russia to damage and disrupt our democracy.

We must meet the new moment accelerating global challenges--from the pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation--challenging the will only to be solved by nations working together and in common. We can't do it alone. We must start with diplomacy rooted in America's most cherished democratic values: defending freedom, championing opportunity, upholding universal rights, respecting the rule of law, and treating every person with dignity.

That's the grounding wire of our global power. That's our inexhaustible source of strength. That's America's abiding advantage.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Manchester Ink Link on 2020 New Hampshire Senate race

Joe Biden on China: (Technology Feb 4, 2021)
Appoint National Security Advisor for Cyber Technology

We'll take on directly the challenges posed by our prosperity, security, and democratic values by our most serious competitor, China. We'll confront China's economic abuses; counter its aggressive, coercive action; to push back on China's attack on human rights, intellectual property, and global governance. But we are ready to work with Beijing when it's in America's interest to do so.

We've elevated the status of cyber issues within our government, including appointing the first Deputy National Security Advisor for Cyber and Emerging Technology. We're launching an urgent initiative to improve our capability, readiness, and resilience in cyberspace.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Manchester Ink Link on 2020 New Hampshire Senate race

Antony Blinken on China: (War & Peace Feb 4, 2021)
Talked with Russia about need for new arms control

Blinken spoke with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. Secretary Blinken and Minister Lavrov discussed the New START extension and the need for new arms control that addresses all of Russia's nuclear weapons and the growing threat from China. The Secretary raised Russian interference in the 2020 United States election, its military aggression in Ukraine and Georgia, the poisoning of Aleksey Navalny, and the SolarWinds incident, among other issues.
Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: Biden Administration Press Release from state.gov

Antony Blinken on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 1, 2021)
Challenge of China is complicated; we need strong alliances

There's no doubt that China poses the most significant challenge to us of any other country, but it's a complicated one. There are adversarial aspects to the relationship, there's certainly competitive ones, and there's still some cooperative ones, too. We have to be able to approach China from a position of strength, not weakness. And that strength, I think, comes from having strong alliances, something China does not have.

As we're thinking about both dealing with this pandemic but also making sure we're in a position to prevent the next one, China has to step up and make sure that it is being transparent, that it is providing information and sharing information, that it is giving access to international experts and inspectors. Its failure to do that is a real problem that we have to address.

Click for Antony Blinken on other issues.   Source: MSNBC interview: Secretary of State (Biden Cabinet)

Jennifer Granholm on China: (Energy & Oil Dec 20, 2020)
Combating climate change is an economic opportunity

Combating climate change is such an economic opportunity for this country. There's going to be trillions of dollars spent globally on combating climate change by countries around the world. We could be producing those products here in the United States and exporting them. We need to be the leader, rather than passive bystanders. Or, otherwise, we're going to allow other countries, like China and others who are fighting to be able to corner this market.
Click for Jennifer Granholm on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week on 2021 Energy Secretary Confirmation Hearings

Susan Rice on China: (Government Reform Nov 11, 2020)
Provided in-depth information during Trump transition

Former Ambassador Susan Rice frames the danger involved in depriving President-elect Joe Biden of access to top intelligence briefings normally afforded to the incoming commander in chief of our armed forces.

Susan Rice recounts her own experience of working through three transitions, including from Obama to Trump. She describes how she "laid out in depth the numerous challenges (Trump) would confront immediately--from the campaign to defeat the Islamic State to threats posed by Russia, China, Iran and North Korea. I stressed the need to be prepared for less obvious threats, like the potentially catastrophic collapse of the Mosul Dam in Iraq and pandemic disease."

The reaction from Trump and his people was typical both in its arrogance and blithe disinterest.

Rice notes that in the current "transition phase," Trump's people have denied the Biden team access to intelligence briefings with respect to national security threats, COVID-19, and related economic issues.

Click for Susan Rice on other issues.   Source: DailyKos blog on Biden Cabinet

Donald Trump on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 22, 2020)
The Paris Accord is not fair to U.S.

TRUMP: The [Paris Climate Accord], I took us out because we were going to have to spend trillions of dollars and we were treated very unfairly. When they put us in there, they did us a great disservice, they were going to take away our businesses. I will not sacrifice tens of millions of jobs, thousands and thousands of companies because of the Paris Accord, it was so unfair. China doesn't kick in until 2030, Russia goes back to a low standard, and we kicked in right away.

BIDEN: Climate change is an existential threat to humanity. I was able to get environmental organizations--as well as people worried about jobs--to support my climate plan. Because it will create millions of new good paying jobs, we're going to take 4 million buildings and 2 million homes and retrofit them so they don't leak as much energy, saving hundreds of millions of barrels of oil in the process and creating significant number of jobs.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 22, 2020)
Pressure China to obey international rules

BIDEN: I'd make China play by the international rules, not like he has done. When I met with Xi and when I was still vice-president, he said we're setting up air identification zones in the South China Sea. You can't fly through them. I said we're going to fly through them. We just flew B-52, B-1 bombers through it. We're not going to pay attention. They have to play by the rules.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Oct 22, 2020)
China has already paid $28B to our farmers

Q: What specifically are you going to do to make China pay? You've said you're going to make them pay. New sanctions?

TRUMP: First of all, China is paying. They're paying billions and billions of dollars. I just gave $28 billion to our farmers.

BIDEN: Taxpayer's money. Didn't come from China.

TRUMP: No, no. You know who the taxpayer is? It's called China. China pays $28 billion, and you know what they did to pay it, Joe? They devalued their currency and they also paid up, and you know got the money? Our farmers, our great farmers, because they were targeted. You never charged them anything. Also, I charged them 25% on dumped steel, because they were killing our steel industry. We were not going to have a steel industry. And now we have a steel industry.

BIDEN: There's a reason why he's bringing up all this malarkey. He doesn't want to talk about the substantive issues. [Based on] the decisions you're making, middle-class families like I grew up in Scranton, they're in trouble.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Oct 22, 2020)
Malarkey that China paid farmers; taxpayers did

Q: What specifically are you going to do to make China pay? You've said you're going to make them pay. New sanctions?

TRUMP: First of all, China is paying. They're paying billions and billions of dollars. I just gave $28 billion to our farmers.

BIDEN: Taxpayer's money. Didn't come from China.

TRUMP: No, no. You know who the taxpayer is? It's called China. China pays $28 billion, and you know what they did to pay it, Joe? They devalued their currency and they also paid up, and you know got the money? Our farmers, our great farmers, because they were targeted. You never charged them anything. Also, I charged them 25% on dumped steel, because they were killing our steel industry. We were not going to have a steel industry. And now we have a steel industry.

BIDEN: There's a reason why he's bringing up all this malarkey. He doesn't want to talk about the substantive issues. [Based on] the decisions you're making, middle-class families like I grew up in Scranton, they're in trouble.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Joe Biden on China: (Government Reform Oct 22, 2020)
Any country that interferes in US elections will pay a price

Q: On the security of our elections: top intelligence officials confirmed that both Russia and Iran are working to influence this election. What would you do to put an end to this threat?

BIDEN: I asked everyone to take the pledge: Any country, no matter who it is, that interferes in American elections will pay a price. They will pay a price. And it's been overwhelmingly clear this election--I won't even get into the last one--this election, that Russia has been involved, China's been involved to some degree, and now we learn that Iran is involved. They will pay a price if I'm elected. They're interfering with American sovereignty. That's what's going on right now. They're interfering with American sovereignty. I don't think the President has said anything to Putin about it. I don't know why he hasn't said a word to Putin about it. His buddy Rudy Giuliani--he's being used as a Russian pawn. He's being fed information that is Russian that is not true. And then what happens? Nothing happens.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Oct 22, 2020)
Need to re-open country during pandemic, to have a country

Q: The CDC has said young people can get sick with COVID-19 and can pass it.

TRUMP: 99.9% of young people recover. We have to recover. We can't close up our nation. We have to open our schools and we can't close up our nation, or you're not going to have a nation.

BIDEN: He says that we're learning to live with it. People are learning to die with it. And you say, "I take no responsibility."

TRUMP: I take full responsibility. It's not my fault that it came here. It's China's fault. They kept it from going into the rest of China for the most part, but they didn't keep it from coming out to the world, including Europe and ourselves. But when I closed, he said, "This is a terrible thing, you're xenophobic." I think [Biden] called me racist even, because I was closing it to China. Now he says I should have closed it earlier.

Q: What do you say to Americans who are fearful that the cost of shutdowns?

BIDEN: What I would say is, I'm going to shut down the virus, not the country.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Oct 22, 2020)
We reduced coronavirus from an expected 2.2 million deaths

Q: What about people who say you could have done more on coronavirus?

TRUMP: 2.2 million people were expected to die. We closed up the greatest economy in the world in order to fight this horrible disease that came from China. The mortality rate is down 85%. There was a spike in Florida and it's now gone. There was a very big spike in Arizona. It's now gone. We have a vaccine that's coming. We have Operation Warp Speed, which is the military is going to distribute the vaccine. I had it and I got better.

BIDEN: He did virtually nothing. And then he gets out of the hospital and he talks about, "Oh, don't worry. It's all going to be over soon." Come on. There's not another serious scientist in the world who thinks it's going to be over soon.

TRUMP: I didn't say "over soon." I say we're learning to live with it. We have no choice. We can't lock ourselves up in a basement like Joe does. As the president couldn't do that and go away for a year and a half until it disappears. I can't do that.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Donald Trump on China: (Principles & Values Oct 22, 2020)
I explored doing business in China; no secret bank account

Q: Your comments on the "secret bank account" in China revealed this week?

TRUMP: I was a businessman doing business. The bank account you're referring to, which is, everybody knows about it, it's listed, the bank account was in 2013. That's what it was. It was opened. It was closed in 2015. I was thinking about doing a deal in China, like millions of other people, I was thinking about it & I decided I'm not going to do it, didn't like it, I decided not to do it, had an account open & I closed it.

BIDEN: I'd make China play by the international rules, not like he has done. When I met with Xi and when I was still vice-president, he said we're setting up air identification zones in the South China Sea. You can't fly through them. I said we're going to fly through them. We just flew B-52, B-1 bombers through it. We're not going to pay attention. They have to play by the rules.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Third 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Kristen Welker

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 15, 2020)
America First means America Alone

We're more isolated in the world than we ever have been. Our "America First" has made "America Alone." You have Iran closer to having enough nuclear material to build a bomb. North Korea has more bombs and missiles available to it. We find ourselves where our NATO allies are publicly saying they can't count on us.

We find ourselves, in the Western Pacific, where we're isolated as well. You have Japan and South Korea at odds with one another. China is making moves. So I would say, we're find ourselves less secure than we've been. I do compliment the president on the deal with Israel recently. But if you take a look, we're not very well trusted around the world. When 17 major nations in the world were asked who they trust more, who's a better leader, and the president came in behind both, the international survey, both behind Putin, as well as Xi. And look what Putin is doing.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Second 2020 Presidential Debate/ABC Town Hall Philadelphia

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Oct 15, 2020)
I put in travel ban to China very early, and Europe too

Q: Why did you only put in place a travel ban from China, and not put in place other measures mitigating the spread of COVID-19?

TRUMP: I did put it in very early. Joe Biden was two months behind me, and he called me xenophobic and racist, because I put it in. And it turned out that I was 100% right. I also put it on Europe, very early, because I saw there was a lot of infection in Europe. The news doesn't get out the right answer, because I put on a travel ban far earlier than Dr. Fauci thought it was necessary. I was actually the only one that wanted to put it on. I put it on at the end of January. When I put on the travel ban Joe Biden, and others, said, "This is ridiculous. You don't do that." Well, Dr. Fauci said, I saved thousands and thousands of lives.

BIDEN: All the way back in the beginning of February, I argued that we should be keeping people in China.In February, I did a piece for USA Today saying, "This is a serious problem." Trump denied it. He said it wasn't.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Second 2020 Presidential Debate/NBC Town Hall Miami

Joe Biden on China: (Health Care Oct 15, 2020)
I wanted to keep people in China in early 2020 pandemic

Q: When this country first became aware of COVID-19, what would you8 have done in terms of actual policy?

BIDEN: I suggested that we should be seeking access to the source of the problem. Trump never pushed that.

Q [to TRUMP]: Why did you only put in place a travel ban from China?

TRUMP: I put it in very early. Joe Biden was two months behind me, and he called me xenophobic and racist.

BIDEN: All the way back in the beginning of February, I argued that we should be keeping people in China. There were 44 people on the ground [in China]. All those 44 people came home [as US citizens despite the ban on non-citizens]. In addition to that, I pointed out that I thought in February, I did a piece for USA Today saying, "This is a serious problem." Trump denied it. He said it wasn't. He missed enormous opportunities and kept saying things that weren't true. "It's going to go away by Easter"; "When the summer comes, it's all going to go away like a miracle." He's still saying those things.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Second 2020 Presidential Debate/ABC Town Hall Philadelphia

Mike Pence on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 7, 2020)
Biden's plan is a $2 trillion version of Green New Deal

PENCE: Joe Biden said, "I guarantee that we will abolish fossil fuels." They have a $2 trillion version of the Green New Deal, that USA Today said really wasn't that very different from the original Green New Deal. More taxes, more regulation, banning fracking, abolishing fossil fuel, crushing American energy and economic surrender to China is a prescription for economic decline. President Trump and I will keep America growing.

HARRIS: Joe Biden will not end fracking, he has been very clear about that.

PENCE: Joe Biden and Kamala Harris would put us back in the Paris Climate Accord. They'd impose the Green New Deal, which would crush American energy and would crush American jobs. President Trump and I believe the progress we have made in a cleaner environment has been happening because we have a free market economy. What's remarkable is the United States has reduced CO2 more than the countries that are still in the Paris Climate Accord, but we've done it through innovation.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: 2020 Vice-Presidential Debate in Utah

Kamala Harris on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 7, 2020)
Trump's China policy has cost American jobs & lives

HARRIS: The Trump administration's approach to China has resulted in the loss of American lives, American jobs. There is a weird obsession that President Trump has with getting rid of whatever accomplishment was achieved by President Obama and Vice President Biden. They created the office responsible for monitoring pandemics. They got rid of it. There was a team of disease experts that President Obama and Vice President Biden dispatched to China to monitor what might happen. They pulled them out.

PENCE: China is to blame for the coronavirus. President Trump stood up to China that had been taking advantage of America for decades in the wake of Joe Biden's cheerleading for China. President Trump made that decision before the end of January to suspend all travel from China. The American people deserve to know Joe Biden opposed President Trump's decision to suspend all travel from China.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: 2020 Vice-Presidential Debate in Utah

Mike Pence on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 7, 2020)
Blame China for the coronavirus

PENCE: China is to blame for the coronavirus. President Trump stood up to China that had been taking advantage of America for decades in the wake of Joe Biden's cheerleading for China. President Trump made that decision before the end of January to suspend all travel from China. The American people deserve to know Joe Biden opposed President Trump's decision to suspend all travel from China.

HARRIS: The Trump administration's approach to China has resulted in the loss of American lives, American jobs. There is a weird obsession that President Trump has with getting rid of whatever accomplishment was achieved by President Obama and Vice President Biden. They created the office responsible for monitoring pandemics. They got rid of it. There was a team of disease experts that President Obama and Vice President Biden dispatched to China to monitor what might happen. They pulled them out.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: 2020 Vice-Presidential Debate in Utah

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Sep 29, 2020)
COVID: We don't know how many died in China, Russia, India

If we would've listened to [Biden and the Democrats], the country would have been left wide open, millions of people would have died, not 200,000. And one person is too much. It's China's fault. It should have never happened. They stopped it from going in, but it was China's fault. And, by the way, when you talk about numbers, you don't know how many people died in China. You don't know how many people died in Russia. You don't know how many people died in India. They don't exactly give you a straight count, just so you understand.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: First 2020 Presidential Debate, moderated by Chris Wallace

Donald Trump on China: (Civil Rights Sep 28, 2020)
Agrees vibrant economy key to addressing racial tensions

Q: You believe that the key to addressing racial tensions is to have a vibrant economy?

TRUMP: That's right. We had the best African American employment numbers in history by far, not even close. We had the best Hispanic American, the best Asian American, the best numbers in history. We had the greatest economy in the history of the world and we had to close it because of the China virus.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: AARP Survey on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Sep 17, 2020)
China is a competitor, not an opponent

Q: Do you believe Russia is an enemy?

BIDEN: I believe Russia is an opponent.

Q: Do you view China as an opponent? The President says you've been too cozy with China, too accepting of them in the international community.

BIDEN: I'm not that guy. We now have a larger trade deficit than we've ever had with China. [Trump in a negative way] keeps going on about the World Trade Organization; they just ruled that his trade policy violated [WTO rules with its tariffs on China]. In our Administration, when the WTO [was dealing with China], we sued. We went to the World Trade Organization 16 times, 16 times.

Q: Do you view China as an opponent?

BIDEN: I view China as a competitor.

Q: Competitor?

BIDEN: A serious competitor. That's why, I think, we have to strengthen our relationships and our alliances in Asia. As you may recall, when I was in China, I said to Xi, "We're going to abide by international norms. That's what we're going to do and insist that they do."

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: CNN Town Hall 2020 drive-in with Anderson Cooper

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Sep 17, 2020)
China unfairly competes with state-owned enterprises

Q: How would you address China's unfair trade policies?

BIDEN: I would make it clear, just as we did in our Administration, that when they use state-owned enterprises, which is what they're doing, state-owned enterprises, to undercut the price that they can charge, to be able to come and compete with American manufacturing, that they would be denied that opportunity. I would also make it clear that if any of that is being purchased by any government agency, that we will not purchase anything that is not made in America, including the downriver line of what has to be done, all the parts.

Q: What would you do differently from President Trump?

BIDEN: You can't do where he's given a tax break to companies that go overseas, and then import the product back into the United States, even though their headquarters is here, the chain goes overseas, and they bring it back in cheaper, than you being able to produce it. I'm going to make sure that it's made in America.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: CNN Town Hall 2020 drive-in with Anderson Cooper

Donald Trump on China: (Civil Rights Sep 15, 2020)
Best employment & best homeownership for Black Americans

Q: When has America been great for African Americans?

TRUMP: We have tremendous African American support. If you look at just prior to this horrible situation coming in from China, when the virus came in, that was the probably the highest point, home ownership for the black community, homeownership, lower crime, the best jobs they've ever had, highest income, the best employment numbers they've ever had. If you go back and you want to look over many years, go back six or seven months, that was the best single moment in the history of the African-American people in this country

Q: Your statement is though, make it great again. Are you aware of how tone deaf that comes off to the African American community? You have yet to acknowledge that there's been a race problem in America.

TRUMP: Well, I hope there's not a race problem. I can tell you, there's none with me, because I have great respect for all races, for everybody. This country is great because of it.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week: special edition 2020 Town Hall interview

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Sep 15, 2020)
Coronavirus was China's fault; I tried to close border

Q: What has been the most difficult part of your presidency?

TRUMP: Without question, I would say, because things were going so well, the whole COVID, the China virus, as I call it, because it comes from China, I think it's a much more accurate term.

It's been very difficult; it's been so sad. We will get there, it's going to happen. But nobody's seen anything like probably since 1917.

Q: What did you learn from it?

TRUMP: I learned that life is very fragile, because [even with] strong people, all of a sudden they were dead. And it wasn't their fault. It was the fault of a country that could have stopped it. And I made a great deal with China. I feel so differently about that [China trade] deal. I don't view it the same way because of the horror of this disease, that could have been stopped at the border.

Q: Could you have done more to stop it?

TRUMP: I don't think so. I think what I did by closing up the country, I saved lives. I think we did a very good job.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week: special edition 2020 Town Hall interview

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Sep 8, 2020)
COVID: Supported China travel ban and national emergency

The president said in the State of the Union [on Feb. 5, 2020], "protecting Americans' health also means fighting infectious diseases. We are coordinating with the Chinese government and working closely together on the coronavirus outbreak in China. My administration will take all necessary steps to safeguard our citizens from this threat."

On Jan. 31, President Trump had declared the coronavirus a public health emergency and announced travel restrictions for China. While the president and his team were starting preparations in the event of an outbreak in the US, many leading Democrats in Washington were too distracted by impeachment to care about the emerging threat.

Despite criticism from Democrats and the media, the president made the right call with the travel ban. He was also right to declare a national emergency and implement social distancing guidelines--not forever, but until we flattened the curve--which likely prevented the failure of hospitals and prevented many American deaths.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Speaking for Myself, by Sarah Huckabee Sanders, p.247

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Aug 21, 2020)
Won't be at the mercy of other countries to protect our own

Biden has been trying to fortify his message on China, and suggested he would pursue the kind of "decoupling" being pushed by leading Republicans. "We'll make the medical supplies and protective equipment that our country needs," he said, while discussing the pandemic. "We'll make them here in America so we will never again be at the mercy of China or other foreign countries in order to protect our own people."
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: D.Brennan/Newsweek on 2020 Democratic National Convention

Susan Rice on China: (Abortion Aug 4, 2020)
Disagrees with son: she's pro-choice, he's pro-life

On abortion: "We agree, for example, on the importance of the United States playing a responsible, principled leadership role in the world," she said of her son. "We agree on the importance of having strong alliances. We agree we have to be cleareyed and strong in dealing with adversaries like Russia and the threat that China may pose. We disagree on things like choice. I'm pro-choice. He's pro-life. That's the kind of difference that we ought to be able to respect."
Click for Susan Rice on other issues.   Source: NPR news website on 2020 Veepstakes

Donald Trump on China: (Civil Rights Jun 18, 2020)
No crackdown on China for repressing Falun Gong or Catholics

CNN obtained a copy of the book before its June 23 release, which the White House is scrambling furiously to stop. Here are some of the things we've learned from Bolton's tell-all about his former boss:

Trump had no problem with China's concentration camps: Bolton describes several instances where Trump waffles on China-related issues after conversations with Xi, notably on the mass concentration camps Beijing was using to imprison and 're-educate' Uyghur Muslims. Bolton writes that according to the US interpreter in the room during a conversation between Xi and Trump at the G-20 meeting in June 2019, Trump said that Xi should go ahead with building the camps, which Trump thought was 'exactly the right thing to do.' Bolton adds that Trump didn't wan

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN excerpts from "The Room Where It Happened"

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 17, 2020)
No involvement in Hong Kong protest or Tiananmen anniversary

[In "The Room Where It Happened", former NSA head John] Bolton writes in the excerpts that the president seemed unmoved by the massive protests last year in Hong Kong against China's communist government over human rights crackdowns. 'I first heard Trump react on June 12, upon hearing that some 1.5 million people had been at Sunday's demonstrations. 'That's a big deal,' he said. But he immediately added, 'I don't want to get involved,' and, 'We have human-rights problems too,' Bolton writes, according to the excerpts.

'I hoped Trump would see these Hong Kong developments as giving him leverage over China. I should have known better,' Bolton continues. 'That same month, on the 30th anniversary of China's massacre of pro-democracy demonstrators in Tiananmen Square, Trump refused to issue a White House statement. 'That was 15 years ago,' he said, inaccurately. 'Who cares about it? I'm trying to make a deal. I don't want anything.' And that was that.'

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: USA Today excerpts from "The Room Where It Happened"

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Jun 17, 2020)
China should buy more American farm products

During a meeting last year, President Donald Trump turned to Chinese President Xi Jinping and asked for an important favor: China should increase its purchase of American soybeans and wheat because aiding American farmers would help him win the upcoming 2020 election, according to excerpts of a new book by Trump's former national security adviser John Bolton.

The request was made during the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan. In Bolton's book, the former adviser paints the president as someone consumed with winning a second term and willing to pressure, cajole and plead with foreign powers to aid his quest.

'Trump's conversations with Xi reflected not only the incoherence in his trade policy but also the confluence in Trump's mind of his own political interests and U.S. national interests,' Bolton writes according to an excerpt published in the Wall street Journal. 'Trump commingled the personal and the national not just on trade questions but across the whole field of national security.'

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: USA Today excerpts from "The Room Where It Happened"

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Jun 17, 2020)
Trump's flimsy trade deal sells out US interest to China

[According to the book "The Room Where It Happened"], during a meeting last year, President Donald Trump turned to Chinese President Xi Jinping and asked for an important favor: China should increase its purchase of American soybeans and wheat because aiding American farmers would help him win the upcoming 2020 election, according to excerpts of a new book by Trump's former national security adviser John Bolton. The request was made during the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

Joe Biden issued a statement saying Trump 'sold out the American people to protect his political future' in his dealings with China that Bolton outlined. 'He was willing to trade away our most cherished democratic values for the empty promise of a flimsy trade deal that bailed him out of his disastrous tariff war that did so much damage to our farmers, manufacturers, and consumers,' Biden said.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: USA Today excerpts from "The Room Where It Happened"

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Jun 9, 2020)
Trade battles with China, Germany, Britain, France, & Canada

During most of 2018-2019, the US president launched the largest trade war in a generation. Though played out through goods and services rather than bullets, a trade war has a real effect on everyday lives. The US consumer bears the majority of costs passed along to businesses and hidden in the prices we pay. Economically struggling Americans feel the results in daily life, especially those who face stagnant wages that have not grown despite having the lowest unemployment we've ever had. The average American cannot recover from a trade war with the same resilience that a corporation can. The only solution will be to actually engage in a trade policy that is not based on populist brinksmanship, which is what we've seen played out for the last few years. As Trump positions China front and center, our country is also embroiled in trade battles with historic allies such as Germany, Britain, France, and Canada.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Our Time Is Now, by Stacey Abrams, p.226

Justin Amash on China: (Foreign Policy May 1, 2020)
We need to be engaged with the world

We need to be engaged with the world, but that doesn't mean we have to be at war throughout the world. It would be a mistake for the US to retreat from the world in the sense of not talking or engaging with other countries. If we don't have that engagement, if we don't have trade with other countries as well, you will have countries like China come in and take advantage of the situation and potentially present a threat to us down the road.
Click for Justin Amash on other issues.   Source: Reason magazine on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Apr 30, 2020)
Claims to have seen evidence COVID19 was from Chinese lab

Fox News: Trump said he has seen evidence suggesting that the coronavirus originated from a laboratory in China, while continuing his criticism of the World Health Organization's ties to Beijing, comparing the group to a public relations agency. "This is something that could have been contained at the original location and I think it could have been contained relatively easily," Trump said. "They were either unable to or they chose not to."

Snopes 7/13/20: One of the conspiracy theories that have plagued attempts to keep people informed during the pandemic is the idea that the coronavirus was created in a laboratory. Scientists who have studied the virus agree that it evolved naturally and crossed into humans from an animal species, most likely a bat. How exactly do we know that this virus, SARS-CoV-2, has a zoonotic animal origin and not an artificial one? The answers lie in the genetic material and evolutionary history of the virus, and understanding the ecology of the bats in question.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox News and Snopes FactCheck on Trump Administration

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Apr 2, 2020)
Ended pandemic early-warning program in Wuhan, China

Two months before the novel coronavirus is thought to have begun in Wuhan, China, the Trump administration ended a $200-million pandemic early-warning program. The initiative, called PREDICT, trained and supported staff in 60 foreign laboratories-- including the Wuhan lab that identified COVID-19. The Wuhan lab received USAID funding for equipment, and PREDICT coordinators connected the scientists there with researchers in other countries in order to synchronize tracking of novel viruses.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: The Los Angeles Times on Trump Administration

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Mar 15, 2020)
Insist on our experts in China, we have to lead the world

Q: What consequences should China face for its role in this global crisis?

Joe Biden: I insisted, the moment this broke out, that we should insist on having our experts in China, in China to see what was happening, and make it clear to China there'd be consequences if we did not have that access. We have to lead the world. We need someone who knows how to bring the world together and insist on fundamental change in the way in which we're approaching this.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 11th Democratic primary debate (Biden-Sanders one-on-one)

Bernie Sanders on China: (Foreign Policy Mar 15, 2020)
China is authoritarian but eliminated extreme poverty

Q: What consequences should China face for its role in this global crisis?

Sanders: I don't think this is the time for recrimination, to be punishing people. Now is the time to be working with China. They are learning a lot about this crisis and we have got to work with them. We've got to work with the World Health Organization. We've got to work with countries around the world. If there was ever a moment when the entire world is in this together, got to support each other, this is that moment.

Q: So you'd work with authoritarian regimes, such as China and Cuba?

Sanders: I believe in democracy, not authoritarianism in Cuba or any place else. China is undoubtedly an authoritarian society. But would anybody deny that extreme poverty in China today is much less than what it was 40 or 50 years ago? That's a fact. So, I think we condemn authoritarianism--but to simply say that nothing ever done by any of those administrations had a positive impact on their people, would I think be incorrect.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 11th Democratic primary debate (Biden-Sanders one-on-one)

Bernie Sanders on China: (Corporations Mar 8, 2020)
Nothing personal against billionaires, but enough is enough

I have nothing personal against any billionaire. No one is denigrating the achievements of Bill Gates or anybody else. No one is denigrating people who have made significant achievements but enough really is enough. In terms of worker control, I believe it is important to put workers on the boards of directors of major corporations. When you do that, corporations are not going to be so quick to shutdown in America and move to China, move to Mexico, and to move to other low wage countries.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday interview on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Mar 8, 2020)
Americans have to compete with people making pennies an hour

Here in Michigan trade has been a disaster. Trade agreements like NAFTA and permanent normal trade relations with China which forced American workers to compete against people making pennies an hour has resulted in the loss of 160,000 jobs here in Michigan. Some four million jobs all over this country. I helped lead the effort against these disastrous trade agreements.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press interview on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Mar 5, 2020)
Coronavirus: People spending money in US; I like that

Q: What's the impact on the economy and also, potentially, on your reelection?

TRUMP: I think people are viewing us as having done a very good job. Nobody is blaming us for the virus. People are now staying in the US, spending their money in the US, & I like that. You know, I've been after that for a long time. They've sort of been forced doing that. It's all going to work out. I just made a great China deal. China is paying us billions of dollars because of what I did to them with tariffs. I mean, to a point where my farmers are in love with me because I took some of that money and gave it to them.

Q: Do you care about the national debt?

TRUMP: I do. Very much. Now, the good thing about the debt is we're paying very little interest--almost nothing. In fact, I want to refinance the debt.

Q: So this would be a focus of a second term?

TRUMP: Oh, absolutely. Now, again, we were disturbed by what's going on with the virus, but that's going to be fine. But, you know, that was a disturbance.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox News Town Halls at the Scranton Cultural Center

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Mar 5, 2020)
Coronavirus: I don't blame anybody; we inherited decisions

We were giving--I think really given tremendous marks--if you look at Gallup poll, you look at other polls--for the way we've handled it. And one of the things I did is I closed down the borders to China and to other areas that are very badly affected. I closed them down very early, against the advice of almost everybody, and we've been given rave reviews.

And that's why we have only, right now, 11--it's a lot of people, but it's still 11 people--versus tremendous numbers of thousands of people that have died all over the world. We have 11. We have 149 cases, as of this moment. This morning, it was 129. So we were really given tremendous marks for having made the decision.

I don't blame anybody. I want to get everybody to understand: They made some decisions which were not good decisions. We inherited decisions that they made, and that's fine. We undid some of the regulations that were made that made it very difficult, but I'm not blaming anybody. We've done a great job.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox News Town Halls at the Scranton Cultural Center

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Mar 5, 2020)
Coronavirus: Nobody but me asked questions about China

Q: Why wait until the testing issue became a crisis before dealing with it?

TRUMP: As soon as I heard that China had a problem, I said, "What's going on with China? How many people are coming in?" Nobody but me asked that question. And you know that I closed the borders very early. We've been given A-pluses for that. You know, it saved a lot of lives.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox News Town Halls at the Scranton Cultural Center

Joe Biden on China: (Health Care Mar 1, 2020)
Coronavirus: Let the scientists speak; let them prepare us

Let the scientists speak. Let them tell us what is going on. Let them prepare us. Let them prepare the country. Let them be the ones explaining how they're going to provide the protective gear for hospitals that are intake hospitals. I would have not have dismantled the organization we had put in place in the first place. I would have made sure we had American scientists in China insisting we know what is happening in China and I would be doing the same thing in Europe where it is now spread.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: CNN "State of the Union" on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Feb 29, 2020)
No other president ever thought of imposing tariffs on China

I also took the strongest-ever action to confront China's illicit trade practices. You see what happened there. Our strategy worked. We have a great relationship with China now. They didn't even respect us. They were taking out $500 billion a year. We had a trade imbalance. So we started charging tariffs. They hit our farmers. I gave the farmers everything that they took out, and the money came from China because it came out of the tariffs. No other President ever thought of it.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Remarks by President Trump at the 2020 CPAC Conference

Donald Trump on China: (Immigration Feb 29, 2020)
Coronavirus: Border security is also health security

Border security is also health security. In our efforts to keep America safe, my administration has taken the most aggressive action in modern history to control our borders and protect Americans from the coronavirus. Came from China. In the early stages of the foreign outbreak, I ordered sweeping travel restrictions to prevent uncontrolled spread of this disease. Not only did we do it, but I did it very early. And that decision has been now given very good grades, like an A-plus- plus-plus.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Remarks by President Trump at the 2020 CPAC Conference

Mike Pence on China: (Free Trade Feb 27, 2020)
China's on notice that the era of economic surrender is over

From day one, this president has fought for free and fair trade. After more than 30 years of trade policy that seemed to be more about just managing economic decline, the U.S.M.C.A. and the phase one China deal marked the beginning of a new era of international trade that puts American jobs and American workers first. The president put China on notice that the era of economic surrender is over. We will continue to stand strong until China opens their markets.
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Remarks by V.P. Pence at the 2020 CPAC Conference

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 26, 2020)
Work on China's Uighur human rights, using business pressure

Q: As president, how would you enforce human rights policies, such as China's persecution of Muslims, despite potential economic pressures that may arise?

BLOOMBERG: Number one, it's a disgrace, their human rights policies. And it's not just against the Uyghurs. It's other ethnic groups in China. And we should try to pressure them to stop it. I think it's also unrealistic to say that we are going to stop doing business with China, for a few reasons. Number one, the biggest problem facing the world is climate change, because it can kill us all. And China is a very big part of that solution. And also the American economy and the Chinese economy are linked. So it's just unrealistic to think that we're going to stop doing business with China, but it is not unrealistic to try to pressure them --not just on human rights, [but also on] stealing intellectual property. They are very unfair in treaties, in the way we do business. We can't own something there; they can own it in our country.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 26, 2020)
China doesn't want a democracy; but don't go to war over it

Q: You said that the Chinese leader is not a dictator--do you stand by that?

BLOOMBERG: Well it's a question of what is a dictator. They don't have a democracy in the sense that they have general elections, that is true. They do have a system where a small group of people appoint the head, and they churn over periodically. If you go back and look at the last two or three decades there've been a number of people that had the same position that Xi Jinping has. I think the question is, if your definition is a democracy where people vote and pick their leaders, that is not what China's about and they don't seem to want it. They like their system, and I think they're wrong. I think they'd be better off opening things up. And I think we should work as hard as we can to change that, but you're not going to war and try to force them. We have to figure out a way to work with them while protecting our industries and protecting our country militarily.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Free Trade Feb 26, 2020)
China tariff--2015: incalculable damage; 2019: not damaging

Larry Kudlow once said Trump's proposed policies on trade would lead to a bad recession, cause "incalculable damage" to the economy and kill consumers and businesses alike. Kudlow made those comments in 2015. Kudlow said the tariffs Trump then sought and has now moved to impose on China and Mexico would damage the US economy enormously. The comments from Kudlow harshly contradict the administration's current positions on trade.

Kudlow stood by the administration's current policies in a phone interview with CNN's KFile. "That was then and this is now," Kudlow said. "I think his trade policies with China in particular have been very strong. They are not damaging the US economy." Asked about his past criticism, Kudlow claimed he was speaking hypothetically.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: CNN K-file on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Tom Steyer on China: (Health Care Feb 26, 2020)
Mandatory Coronavirus vaccines; and other immediate actions

Q: Coronavirus is spreading now quickly outside of China. If and when they were to develop a vaccine, if you were president, would you mandate that Americans take the vaccine?

STEYER: If it were necessary to take the vaccine to prevent the spread of the Coronavirus through the United States, yes, I would. But let me talk for a second about Coronavirus. Because what we're seeing is that this is a pandemic that hasn't been handled well. Back in 2014, there was an Ebola outbreak in Africa; President Obama did a fantastic job of controlling it. We're seeing the exact opposite from this president. We're seeing a president who just asked Congress for money to deal with it today. The World Health Organization declared an emergency in January. So what we're seeing here, the Coronavirus may or may not turn into a worldwide epidemic. But what we know for sure is that it's going to have a huge impact on the world economy as we try to deal with it.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Health Care Feb 26, 2020)
Deal with coronavirus with international integration

Q: The spread of the coronavirus outside of China has rattled the stock market. If you were president, how would you respond?

BUTTIGIEG: Well, first of all, we've got to meet 21st century security threats with a forward-looking security policy. This president's idea of how to keep us safe is a big wall. That is a 17th century security solution. I would be making sure that we have the coordination across the federal government for something that is a health issue, an economic issue, a security issue, and needs to have an integrated approach. But it's not enough to integrate within the United States. We've got to integrate internationally. The virus does not care what country it is in. And in order to deal with an issue like that, you need international partnerships and global relationships of the very kind that this president is tearing to shreds on an almost daily basis. This is why we need first and foremost, to restore the credibility of the US among the nations of the world.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Joe Biden on China: (Health Care Feb 26, 2020)
Insist that China let our experts inspect for coronavirus

Q: What would you be doing differently than Trump on coronavirus?

BIDEN: I think it's important that we understand that you have to have a president in charge. What I would do were I president now, I would not be taking China's word for it. I would insist that China allow our scientists in to make a hard determination of how it started, where it's from, how far along it is. Because that is not happening now. And we should be allowed to do that and they should want us to do that, because we have genuine experts who know how to confront these things. But we need to invest [in science agencies] immediately. We should have done it from the beginning, the moment the virus appeared. But we're getting late, but we've got good scientists. And I just hope the president gets on the same page as the scientists.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Feb 26, 2020)
Screen people coming from coronavirus-infected areas

[Debate moderator]: We heard from President Trump tonight, detailing the administration's response to the spread of the Coronavirus. And I want to tell you what it includes. It includes stopping non- U.S. citizens from coming to the U.S. from China; screening people coming into the country from infected areas; quarantining those infected; and developing a vaccine.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Immigration Feb 26, 2020)
Staple a Green Card on every foreign student college degree

A lot of the students who come here to study and get degrees--we are letting them go back to China, we should try to keep them here. One of the things in immigration is you've got to do some things quickly in immigration, stop this craziness with 11 million people who are living in the shadows, you've got to give them a clear path to citizenship.

You've got to staple a green card on every degree when they get out of college, particularly if they're studying STEM, I mean, there are a whole bunch of these things, and we need more immigrants, not less immigrants--and a lot of them come from China.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: CNN S. C. Town Hall for 2020 Presidential primary

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 25, 2020)
Meet with North Korea and China together

Q: How would you deal with North Korea?

BIDEN: You don't negotiate with a dictator, give him legitimacy without any notion whether he is going to do anything at all. You don't do that. Look what happened. [President Trump] gave this dictator--he's a thug--legitimacy. We've weakened the sanctions around the world.

Q: So what would you do?

BIDEN: I would be in Beijing, I would be speaking with Xi Jinping. I would be reassigning the relationship between the Japan and South Korea, and I would make it clear to China, we are going to continue to move closer to make sure that we can, in fact, prevent North Korea from launching missiles to take them down.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 10th Democratic Primary debate on eve of S.C. primary

Joe Biden on China: (Health Care Feb 25, 2020)
Work with China, in China, on coronavirus

Q: What would you do about coronavirus?

BIDEN: What we did with Ebola--I was part of making sure that pandemic did not get to the United States, saved millions of lives. And what we did, we set up, I helped set up that office on pandemic diseases. We increased the budget of the CDC. We increased the NIH budget. And our president today--and he's wiped all that out. [With Ebola], we did it; we stopped it.

Q: So, more funding?

BIDEN: I would immediately restore the funding. [Trump] cut the funding for CDC. He tried to cut the funding for NIH. He cut the funding for the entire effort. And here's the deal. I would be on the phone with China and making it clear, we are going to need to be in your country; you have to be open; you have to be clear; we have to know what's going on; we have to be there with you, and insist on it and insist, insist, insist. I could get that done. No one up here has ever dealt internationally with any of these world leaders. I'm the only one that has.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 10th Democratic Primary debate on eve of S.C. primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Energy & Oil Feb 19, 2020)
Convince China & India that they'll lose from climate change

Q: Your business is heavily invested in China, the number one producer in the world of carbon emissions. How far would you go to force China to reduce those emissions and tackle the climate crisis?

BLOOMBERG: Well, you're not going to go to war with them. You have to negotiate with them--and we've seen how well that works with tariffs that are hurting us. What you have to do is convince the Chinese that it is in their interest, as well. Their people are going to die just as our people are going to die. And we'll work together. In all fairness, the China has slowed down. It's India that is an even bigger problem. But it is an enormous problem. Nobody's doing anything about it. We could right here in America make a big difference. We're closing the coal-fired power plants. If we could enforce some of the rules on fracking so that they don't release methane into the air and into the water, you'll make a big difference.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: MSNBC's 9th Democrat primary debate, in Las Vegas

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Feb 19, 2020)
Chinese pollution will result in tariffs on their products

China is taking the dirtiest coal in the world mostly out of Mongolia and spreading it all around the world. Make it clear when you call them to Washington in the first 100 days, if you continue, you will suffer severe consequences because the rest of the world will impose tariffs on everything you're selling because you are undercutting the entire economy.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 9th Democrat 2020 primary debate, in Las Vegas Nevada

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Feb 4, 2020)
We said "that's enough" to China & signed new trade deal

I promised that I would impose tariffs to confront China's massive theft of American jobs. We signed the new agreement with China that will defend our workers, protect our intellectual property, bring billions of dollars into our treasury, and open new markets. They could never believe what they were able to get away with without someone in our country stepping up and saying: Enough. Now, we want to rebuild our country, and that is what we are doing.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2020 State of the Union address to Congress

Donald Trump on China: (Health Care Feb 4, 2020)
Eradicate AIDS epidemic by the end of this decade

We are coordinating with the Chinese government on the Coronavirus outbreak in China. We have launched ambitious new initiatives to substantially improve care for Americans with kidney disease, Alzheimer's, and those struggling with mental health challenges. And because the Congress funded my request, we are pursuing new cures for childhood cancer, and we will eradicate the AIDS epidemic in America by the end of the decade.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2020 State of the Union address to Congress

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Jan 21, 2020)
South Asia policy focused on Afghanistan not India

In Nov. 2017, Trump sat down with Indian Prime Minister Modi. Back at the White House, Trump was known to have affected an Indian accent to imitate Modi, a sign of disrespect for the Prime Minister.

As with most foreign leader meetings, Trump had been briefed but didn't seem to have retained the material and instead tried to wing it. Modi tried to focus on the threats India faced from Afghanistan, China, and Pakistan. His mention of Afghanistan led Trump off on a lengthy tangent about how stupid it had been for the US to have maintained its military presence in Afghanistan.

When Modi mentioned his concerns about China's aggressions in the region, Trump revealed a stunning ignorance about geography. "It's not like you've got China on your border", seeming to dismiss the threat to India.

Each time Modi tried to get Trump to engage on the substance of US-India relations, the American president veered off on another non sequitur trade deficiencies and endless war in Afghanistan.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: A Very Stable Genius, by P.Rucker & C.Leonnig, p.163-4

Amy Klobuchar on China: (Free Trade Jan 14, 2020)
We need a North American trading bloc to take on China

I will never forget going to a plant and there was one worker left. That plant had been shut down because of Trump's trade policies. That worker brought out a coat rack of uniforms and he said, these are my friends, they don't work anymore. And their names were embroidered on those uniforms, These are real people hurt by Donald Trump's trade war. We need a big trading bloc with North America to take on China.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 7th Democrat primary debate, on eve of Iowa caucus

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Free Trade Jan 14, 2020)
China trade deal will help farmers, then work to improve it

Q: You support the USMCA?

WARREN: I led the fight against the trade deal with Asia and the deal with Europe, because I didn't think it was in the interests of the American people. But we have farmers who are hurting. They are hurting because of Donald Trump's initiated trade wars. This new trade deal is a modest improvement. It will give some relief to farmers. It will give some relief to workers. I believe we accept that relief, and we get up the next day and fight for a better trade deal.

Sen. Bernie SANDERS: It is not so easy to put together new trade legislation. If this is passed, I think it will set us back a number of years. Senator Warren is right in saying we need to bring the stakeholders to the table, the family farmers here in Iowa and in Vermont and around the country, the environmental community, and the workers. I am sick and tired of trade agreements negotiated by the CEOs of large corporations behind doors.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: 7th Democrat primary debate, on eve of Iowa caucus

Tom Steyer on China: (Free Trade Jan 14, 2020)
Undo Trump tariffs; negotiate trade deals for U.S. workers

Q: Even though farmers and manufacturers could see some relief from the China deal, they've been crushed by the current administration's trade war. What will you do as president to help them get back on their feet?

STEYER: On the first day, I would undo Mr. Trump's tariffs. On the first day, I would get rid of his waivers to oil refiners [regarding] not having to use corn-based ethanol.

Sen. Elizabeth WARREN: These trade deals have been negotiated surrounded with giant multi-national corporation lobbyists who whisper in the ears of our negotiators and then get deals cut that are great for the giant multi-national corporations, not good for American workers.

STEYER: In fact, these trade deals have been exactly what Senator Sanders and Warren have been saying, which is that they've been designed to grow the American GDP for the corporations of America, not for the working people of America.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: 7th Democrat primary debate, on eve of Iowa caucus

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Dec 31, 2019)
Fact check: Trump claims China is paying new tariffs

False claim: "You're not paying for those tariffs. China's paying for those tariffs," the president told an Ohio crowd. "Until such time as there is a deal, we will be taxing the hell out of China."

Economists and experts told NBC News this is false. Consumers purchasing foreign goods are the ones who picked up the tab. J.P. Morgan estimated the cost of these tariffs on average U.S. families was more than $1,000.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: NBC News analysis of impeaching Trump

Tom Steyer on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 24, 2019)
Rebuild traditional multilateral alliances like NATO

Steyer focuses on reversing what he calls Trump's isolationist stance. He pledges to "rebuild" military alliances such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

Steyer says he would "work with our traditional allies in a multilateral way" and argues that Trump's pullback from global institutions has left a vacuum that China and Russia are eager to fill. He says he will "reinvigorate" the State Department, where Trump has sought budget and staffing cuts.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Free Trade Dec 24, 2019)
Trade with China is good for consumers & the US economy

Bloomberg has been a proponent of deeper trade and investment ties with China and he opposes President Trump's trade war with Beijing. He says the US must work closely with China on climate change and other issues, and has drawn scrutiny for his business relationships in the country.

He has advanced a more moderate view of China's leadership than some other candidates, saying in 2019 that Chinese President Xi Jinping is "not a dictator" and that Beijing is making progress on climate goals.

He opposes Trump's trade war with China, calling it a "failure of our government" and arguing that it is hurting the economy, costing jobs, and slowing innovation. He says China's unfair trade practices need to be addressed through negotiation.

He argues that trade with China is good for consumers and the US economy, but that China needs to further open its markets to US companies. He has previously said that expanded trade puts pressure on Beijing to "act responsibly" on the world stage.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Free Trade Dec 24, 2019)
Supports TPP and opposes trade war with China

Bloomberg argues that free trade with China and others is not a "zero-sum game" and is instead good for consumers and the U.S. economy. He has also said that expanded trade puts pressure on Beijing to "act responsibly" on the world stage.

He supported the Obama administration's Asia-Pacific trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which Trump rejected. He opposes Trump's trade war with China, arguing that it is hurting the economy, costing jobs, and slowing innovation. He calls for China to further open its markets to U.S. companies and says that its unfair trade practices need to be addressed through negotiation. He has argued in the wake of Trump's imposition of tariffs that Congress should exert more oversight over presidential trade powers.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Deval Patrick on China: (Free Trade Dec 24, 2019)
Deeper trade ties between U.S. and China

Patrick has issued no policy proposals relating to China or the ongoing trade war, though as governor of Massachusetts he advocated for deeper trade ties between the two countries.

As governor, he made his first foreign trade mission to Beijing in 2007, where he spoke of Massachusetts's historic trade ties to China.

During his tenure, he worked to arrange direct Boston-Beijing flights, deepen U.S.-China research cooperation, and increase U.S. companies' investment in China.

Click for Deval Patrick on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Tom Steyer on China: (Free Trade Dec 24, 2019)
No trade war, but stand up to China on intellectual property

Steyer calls China a competitor, but says that "like it or not" the United States has to maintain a political and economic relationship with Beijing.

Steyer opposes President Donald J. Trump's trade war with China but says the United States must "stand up strongly" to Beijing's theft of U.S. intellectual property.

He believes that Trump's America First policy has created a void in international power politics that China and Russia are eager to fill.

He says the United States should respond to abuses by authorities in Hong Kong by creating a coalition of democracies to push back, rather than seeking a bilateral solution.

He argues that the United States can't isolate itself from China, since working with China on climate and regional security will require maintaining a good relationship with Beijing.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Joe Walsh on China: (Free Trade Dec 24, 2019)
Everybody loses in a trade war with China

Walsh's comments on China have focused on criticizing Trump's trade war and advocating for free trade. He opposes Trump's escalating tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars worth of Chinese imports, arguing that "everybody loses in a trade war."

He says that the tariffs amount to a tax increase on the middle class and that Beijing's retaliation is "devastating to our farmers." He calls Trump's claim that tariffs are paid by for by China "absurd."

Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 19, 2019)
China uses technology for perfection of dictatorship

Q: Should the US do more than protest and issue sanctions against China? Should the US, for example, boycott the 2022 Beijing Olympics?

Pete Buttigieg: I think that any tool ought to be on the table, especially diplomatic, economic and social tools like what you're describing. Look, for the president to let it be known that his silence--whether it's on the rounding up of Muslim Uyghurs in Xinjiang, putting them into camps, or the aspirations of the people of Hong Kong for democracy--for him to let China know that his silence can be purchased is trashing American values. What message is that sending to the Chinese Communist Party? We have to acknowledge what's going on over there. The use of technology for the perfection of dictatorship. The

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Newshour/Politico/PBS December Democratic primary debate

Tom Steyer on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 19, 2019)
Work with China as a frenemy under all circumstances

Q: Many Americans have been moved in the last months by the protests of the people of Hong Kong. What would you do as president if the Chinese government moved in militarily?

Steyer: The way the US should be reacting in Hong Kong is by gathering our coalition of democracy and freedom loving partners and allies to push back. In fact, when we're making moral statements around the world, it should not be us threatening and trying to be the world's policemen. It should be us leading on a value-driven basis with the other people who share our values and want to change the world. We actually can't isolate ourselves from China. In fact, we have to work with them as a frienemy. If we are going to treat climate as the threat that it is, we are going to have to partner with the Chinese. They're going to have to trust us and together we're going to have to solve this problem. We need a good relationship with them. We're going to have to work with them going forward under all circumstances.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: Newshour/Politico/PBS December Democratic primary debate

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 19, 2019)
Protect the Uighurs, but no military action against China

Q: China is engaged in an unprecedented military buildup. Is the US on a collision course toward war with China?

Biden: It's on a collision course with China but not for war. What we have to make clear is that we in fact are not going to abide by what they've done. One million Uyghurs, Muslims, are in concentration camps. They're being abused. We should be moving 60% of our sea power to that area of the world, to let the Chinese understand that they're not going to go any further. Secondly, we should make sure that we began to rebuild our alliances. We in fact need to have allies who understand that we're going to stop the Chinese from their actions. We should be gone to the UN immediately and sought sanctions against them and the United Nations for what they did. We have to be firm. We don't have to go to war but we have to make it clear, "This is as far as you go, China." And in terms of their military buildup, it's real but it would take them about 17 years to build up to where we are.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Newshour/Politico/PBS December Democratic primary debate

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Dec 19, 2019)
USMCA agreement does not prevent outsourcing or talk climate

Q: Will you support the trade agreement among the US, Canada, and Mexico, recently passed by the House?

Sanders: I voted against NAFTA, voted against PNC with China, agreements that cost four million decent-paying jobs. I don't agree this is going to be a great job creator. This is a modest improvement that would allow Mexican workers to negotiate decent contracts. But it is not going to stop outsourcing. It is not going to stop corporations from moving to Mexico. We need a trade policy that stands up for workers, stands up for farmers, and, by the way, the word "climate change" is not discussed, which is an outrage. I will not be voting for this agreement.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar: I am voting for it; I believe we have a change with this agreement. We've got better labor standards, better environmental standards, and a better deal when it comes to the pharmaceutical provision. While Senator Sanders is correct, there are some issues with it, is much better than the one originally proposed.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Newshour/Politico/PBS December Democratic primary debate

Amy Klobuchar on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 11, 2019)
Beware China's Uighur internment camps & Hong Kong crackdown

We only have to look at China's detention of over one million Uighurs in internment camps or its attempts to crack down on democratic protesters in Hong Kong to see how far that country will go. And it has been playing by its own trade rules for years, stealing our cutting-edge technologies and intellectual property, and dumping steel. It weaponizes its economy against its neighbors by withholding key exports to try to extract political concessions, and it is pouring money into a military modernization program specifically designed to keep America at a distance and intimidate its neighbors. It's trying to embed itself in our most sensitive infrastructure through internet firms which we know have strong ties to the Chinese government.

If you're China and looking at us right now, you see a president that doesn't keep his decisions seven minutes from now. He has used a meat cleaver--or, should I say, a tweet cleaver--and is creating chaos with his erratic approach.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Nov 27, 2019)
Protect human rights in Hong Kong against China

China reacted furiously to President Donald Trump's signing of two bills on Hong Kong human rights and said the US will bear the unspecified consequences. A foreign ministry statement repeated heated condemnations of the laws and said China will counteract. It said all the people of Hong Kong & China oppose the move.

Trump signed the bills, which were approved by near unanimous consent in the House and Senate, even as he expressed some concerns about complicating the effort to work out a trade deal with China. "I signed these bills out of respect for President Xi, China, and the people of Hong Kong," Trump said. "They are being enacted in the hope that Leaders and Representatives of China & Hong Kong will be able to amicably settle their differences leading to long term peace & prosperity for all."

"We have to stand with Hong Kong," Trump said in an interview on "Fox & Friends." He continued: "But I'm also standing with President Xi. He's a friend of mine. He's an incredible guy.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Idaho Statesman coverage of Trump Cabinet

Andrew Yang on China: (Foreign Policy Nov 20, 2019)
International consensus and coalitions on data

Q: How would you deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin?

YANG: We're going to live up to our international commitments. We're going to recommit to our partnerships and alliances, including NATO. And it was James Mattis that said "the more you invest in diplomats and diplomacy, the less you have to spend on ammunition." That has to be the path forward to help build an international consensus not just against Russia, but also to build a coalition that will help us put pressure on China, in terms of their treatment of their ethnic minorities, and what's going on in Hong Kong.

I want to propose a new world data organization, like a WTO for data, because right now, unfortunately, we're living in a world where data is the new oil and we don't have our arms around it. These are the ways that we'll actually get Russia to the table and make it so they have to join the international community and stop resisting appeals to the world order.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Cory Booker on China: (Foreign Policy Nov 20, 2019)
Call out China for human rights violations

Q: China is using force against demonstrators in Hong Kong. Would the U.S. help their movement, and how?

BOOKER: We need a stronger policy, one that's led by American values. Yes, we will call China out for its human rights violations. It is about time that this country is led by someone who will say the values of freedom and democracy are what we are going to lead with and begin to check China, Putin, and the other folks that are trying to undermine democratic values.

Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Nov 20, 2019)
Speak out against China at UN, for Uighurs and Hong Kong

With regard to China, look, unless we make it clear that we stand for human rights, we should be going to the United Nations seeking condemnation of China, what they're doing with the million Uighurs that are there, essentially in concentration camps in the west. We should be vocally, vocally speaking out about the violation of the commitment they made to Hong Kong. We have to speak out and speak loudly about violations of human rights.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Andrew Yang on China: (Homeland Security Nov 20, 2019)
Threats of tomorrow are Chinese A.I. and military drones

Q: What has prepared you to respond to a terrorist attack or a major disaster?

YANG: As commander-in-chief, I think we need to be focused on the real threats of the 21st century. And what are those threats? Climate change, artificial intelligence, loose nuclear material, military drones, and non-state actors. And if you look, we're in the process of potentially losing the AI arms race to China right now, because they have more access to more data than we do, and their government is putting billions of dollars to work subsidizing the development of AI in a way that we are not. We are 24 years behind on technology. And I can say that with authority, because we got rid of the Office of Technology Assessment in 1995. Think about that timing. I guess they thought they'd invented everything. The next commander-in-chief has to be focused on the true threats of tomorrow. And that's what I will bring to the table as commander-in-chief.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Homeland Security Nov 20, 2019)
Re-prioritize runaway growth in military spending

Q: Would you cut military spending? Or would you keep it on the same upward trajectory?

BUTTIGIEG: We need to re-prioritize our budget as a whole and our military spending in particular. It's not just how much, although we certainly need to look at the runaway growth in military spending. It's also where. Right now, we are spending a fraction of the attention and resources on things like the artificial intelligence research that China is doing right now. If we fall behind on artificial intelligence, the most expensive ships that the United States is building just turned into bigger targets. We do not have a 21st century security strategy coming from this president. After all, he's relying on 17th century security technologies, like a moat full of alligators or a big wall. There is no concept of strategic planning for how civilian, diplomatic, and military security work needs to take place for the future.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Susan Rice on China: (Free Trade Nov 14, 2019)
Deal with challenge from China in lockstep with allies

I think that we face a significant and urgent challenge from China, particularly in the economic realm and with respect to technology. China is poised, through its capacity and its policies, to be a major economic threat. I think we're dealing with it almost altogether wrong. To me, for the United States to be maximally effective in pressing our economic agenda with China, we ought to be doing it in lockstep with our allies and partners--the Europeans, others in Asia, Canada.

China is becoming more and more aggressive and assertive in this whole realm in trying to shut down anything that they don't like with respect to speech and democratization, human rights. They are being extremely extraterritorial about it. And they are going to punish people. My view is that the companies that are going to succeed--if they are American-based companies or originally American companies--are the ones that aren't going to take that crap, that aren't going to be intimidated.

Click for Susan Rice on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 Veepstakes

Bill Weld on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 3, 2019)
Multi-party talks to resolve Venezuelan situation

Q: What additional steps should the U.S. take to remove Nicolas Maduro from power in Venezuela?

A: We have to go through Cuba, China and Russia to rationalize the situation in Venezuela. Most of the top decision makers there are Cuban, which has hollowed out Venezuela's government, & the spillover into our ally Colombia has been dramatic. I would propose multi-party talks, in which the dynamic new Pres. Duque of Colombia, who greatly impressed me recently in Cartagena, could perhaps play a role.

Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Bill Weld on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 3, 2019)
China promised two systems for Hong Kong; we're watching

Q: How should China's treatment of the Uighurs and the situation in Hong Kong affect broader U.S. policy toward China?

A: China's behavior should be a wake-up call for the United States, its allies, friends, and partners. While the US can and must do business with China, it can have no illusions about the type of state China is and about its ambitions. It also needs to be clear that it will not accept China continuing to follow the old line, "we're big, you're small. What don't you understand?" It is not acceptable in the 21st century. China should have no doubt that the world knows what it is doing, and is watching. China promised the peoples of Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, and the world, at the 1997 handover ceremony which I attended in Hong Kong, that there would be and could be two systems in a single country. If China takes a punitive approach, China will demonstrate that its political word is suspect. The implications for Taiwan, a real Chinese democracy, are ominous.

Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Joe Walsh on China: (Free Trade Sep 24, 2019)
Supports a free trade system; opposes tariffs on China

Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: Business Insider background for 2019 GOP presidential debate

Joe Walsh on China: (Free Trade Sep 24, 2019)
China cheats world, so deal with them with world coalition

Q: Some economists blame the slowing economy on Trump's trade war with China. Without tariffs, how do you change that relationship?

Joe Walsh: China cheats but they don't just cheat against us. They cheat against the whole world. And they've been doing it for a long time. So in comes Trump, and throws down tariffs against everybody and he goes at China all by himself. And so who pays the price? We do: our farmers, small business, and American consumers. The mistake Trump made, is he put us out there on an island all by ourselves. Instead of rallying the whole world--getting us back in the Trans-Pacific Partnership, where we could have a coalition of countries that could deal with China--he's done it all by himself. And America has paid a big, big price for that. You got to bring the world together to fight China.

Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: Business Insider 2019 GOP presidential primary debate

Bill Weld on China: (Free Trade Sep 24, 2019)
Rejoin TPP in a heartbeat: beachhead against China

Q: Governor, do you sign TPP? What do you do?

Bill Weld: Oh I absolutely would rejoin, would join TPP in a heartbeat. I point out that during the campaign candidate Trump said no we can't join the Trans-Pacific Partnership because it would be dominated by China. He's so incurious and so ignorant about foreign affairs that he didn't know that China is not a member of TPP. The whole idea was that we would have a consortium of 12 Pacific Navy facing nations some in Asia some in the Americas without China at the table. So it would be our beachhead in Asia. I think the relationship with China. Has to be a complex one. We're the two biggest players out there. Xi Jinping I had high hopes for when he came, in but he really has resubsidized all those SOEs, the state owned enterprises, and we're getting our brains beat in around the world and on intellectual property they are complete scofflaws. So you've got to be tough and I think we'll probably return to this.

Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Business Insider 2019 GOP presidential primary debate

Donald Trump on China: (Principles & Values Sep 14, 2019)
We don't win anymore; we lose to China and Mexico

[When 2016 debate moderator Megyn Kelly pressed Trump on misogyny], Trump launched into a tirade. "We don't win anymore. We lose to China. We lose to Mexico at the border. We lose to everybody." He spun his wheels a second before a threat slipped out, "And frankly, what I say often times, is it's fun, it's kidding. We have a good time. What I say is what I say. And honestly Megyn, If you don't like it, I'm sorry. I've been very nice to you, although I could probably maybe not be, based on the way you've treated me. But I would not do that."

The next day on CNN, Trump carried through on the threat. "You could see there was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her whatever. In my opinion, she was off base." Had Trump just accused Megyn of attacking him because she was menstruating? It sure sounded that way, but the nuances could be debated forever, and they were.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Piety & Power, by Tom LoBianco, p.228-9

Julian Castro on China: (Foreign Policy Sep 12, 2019)
Pressure China on human rights for Uighurs

Q: How would you pressure China?

CASTRO: I would immediately begin to negotiate with China to ratchet down that trade war. We have leverage there.

I also believe that we need to return to a leader when it comes to things like human rights. We have millions of Uighurs, for instance, in China that right now are being imprisoned and mistreated.

And in North Korea, this president is elevating a dictator. We need to stop that. We need to return to ensuring that America leads again on human rights.

Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Either we make up trade policy, or China will

Sen. Bernie SANDERS: Joe Biden and I strongly disagree on trade. I helped lead the opposition to NAFTA and PNTR, which cost this country over 4 million good-paying jobs.

BIDEN: Yeah, well, look, we're either going to make policy or China's going to make the rules of the road. We make up 25 percent of the world economy. We need another 25 percent to join us. And I think-Senator Warren is correct: At the table has to be labor and at the table have to be environmentalists. The fact of the matter is, China--the problem isn't the trade deficit, the problem is they're stealing our intellectual property. The problem is they're violating the WTO. They're dumping steel and dumping agricultural products on us. In addition to that, we're in a position where, if we don't set the rules, we, in fact, are going to find ourselves with China setting the rules. And that's why you need to organize the world to take on China, to stop the corrupt practices that are underway.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Andrew Yang on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Tariffs pummel our farmers; but we need a deal with China

Q: Would you repeal Trump's tariffs on your first day in office?

YANG: I would not repeal the tariffs on day one, but I would let the Chinese know that we need to hammer out a deal, because right now, the tariffs are pummeling producers and farmers in Iowa who have absolutely nothing to do with the imbalances that we have with China.

A CEO friend of mine was in China recently and he said that he saw pirated U.S. intellectual property on worker workstations to the tune of thousands of dollars per head. And he said, one, "How can my workers compete against that?" And, two, "Think about all the lost revenue to American companies."

So, the imbalances are real. But we have to let the Chinese know that we recognize that President Trump has pursued an arbitrary and haphazard trade policy that has had victims on both sides. So, no to repealing the tariffs immediately, but yes to making sure we come to a deal that addresses the concerns of American companies.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Giant corporations set our trade policy; add in activists

Q: President Obama signed the Trans-Pacific Partnership. In part, it was designed to rein in China. What do you think he got wrong?

WARREN: So our trade policy in America has been broken for decades, and it has been broken because it works for giant multinational corporations and not for much of anyone else. These are giant corporations that, shoot, if they can save a nickel by moving a job to a foreign country, they'll do it in a heartbeat.

And yet for decades now, who's been whispering in the ears of our trade negotiators? Who has shaped our trade policy? It's been the giant corporations. It's been their lobbyists and their executives.

The way we change our trade policy in America is, first, the procedures. Who sits at the table? I want to negotiate trade with unions at the table. I want to negotiate it with small farmers at the table. I want to negotiate it with environmentalists at the table. I want to negotiate with human rights activists at the table.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Everybody wants access to American market; so leverage China

Q: How would you pressure China?

Secretary Julian CASTRO: I would immediately begin to negotiate with China to ratchet down that trade war. We have leverage there.

Q: What leverage can America bear to pressure China?

Senator Elizabeth WARREN: Are you kidding? Everybody wants access to the American market. That means that we have the capacity to say right here in America, you want to come sell goods to American consumers? Then you got to raise your standards. You've got to raise your labor standards. You've got to raise your environmental standards, so our companies can compete on a level playing field. We can use trade not to undermine American workers and not to undermine American farms and not to undermine small businesses in this country. We can use trade to help build a stronger economy.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Julian Castro on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Erratic, haphazard trade wars hurt American families

Q: In one of the previous debates, you identified China as the most serious national security threat to our country. Senator Klobuchar said she would go back to the negotiating table with China, and avoid Trump's fast-changing trade rules. What do you do for leverage?

CASTRO: Well, look, I agree with those who have said that this erratic, haphazard trade war is hurting American families. As Senator Klobuchar said, [Trump's trade war has cost 300,000 American jobs. It's estimated that it's cost $600 to the average American family. So when I become president, I would immediately begin to negotiate with China to ratchet down that trade war. We have leverage there. I also believe, though, that we need to return to a leader when it comes to things like human rights. When it comes to this trade war, I would immediately begin ratcheting that trade war down. We have leverage in that discussion.

Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Trump tariffs come down on us, without any bigger strategy

Q: President Trump tweets that the Chinese are just going to wait him out so that they can get a Democrat who they can take advantage of. How do you think about China? We've seen President Trump call President Xi both an enemy and a friend.

BUTTIGIEG: Well, the president clearly has no strategy. You know, when I first got into this race, I remember President Trump scoffed and said he'd like to see me making a deal with Xi Jinping. I'd like to see HIM making a deal with Xi Jinping! Is it just me, or was that supposed to happen in, like, April?

Q: Would you repeal the tariffs?

BUTTIGIEG: I would have a strategy that would include the tariffs as leverage, but it's not about the tariffs. Look, what's going on right now is a president who has reduced the entire China challenge into a question of tariffs, when what we know is that the tariffs are coming down on us more than anybody else and there's a lack of a bigger strategy.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Kamala Harris on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
Export American products, not American jobs

Q: How would your trade policy differ from President Obama's?

HARRIS: My trade policy, under a Harris administration, is always going to be about saying, we need to export American products, not American jobs. And to do that, we have to have a meaningful trade policy. I am not a protectionist Democrat. Look, we need to sell our stuff. And that means we need to sell it to people overseas. That means we need trade policies that allow that to happen.

Q: What about China?

HARRIS: It's a complicated relationship. We have to hold China accountable. They steal our products, including our intellectual property. They dump substandard products into our economy. They need to be held accountable. We also need to partner with China on climate and the crisis that that presents. We need to partner with China on the issue of North Korea.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Sep 12, 2019)
China's President Xi is both an enemy and a friend

Q [to Mayor Pete Butigieg]: President Trump tweets that the Chinese are just going to wait him out so that they can get a Democrat who they can take advantage of. How do you think about China? We've seen President Trump call President Xi both an enemy and a friend.

BUTTIGIEG: Well, the president clearly has no strategy. You know, when I first got into this race, I remember President Trump scoffed and said he'd like to see me making a deal with Xi Jinping. I'd like to see HIM making a deal with Xi Jinping! Is it just me, or was that supposed to happen in, like, April? We saw it at the G7 [international policy meeting]. The leaders of some of the greatest powers and economies of the world sitting to talk about one of the greatest challenges in the world, climate change, and there was literally an empty chair where American leadership could have been.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Beto O`Rourke on China: (Foreign Policy Sep 4, 2019)
U.S. investment in Brazil incentivizes burning the Amazon

Q: The Amazon is being burned. A big incentive for deforestation comes from U.S. investors in the Brazilian meat industry. How will you use U.S. trade leverage to encourage Brazil to protect these vital resources?

O'ROURKE: Our involvement and investment in Brazil is one of the pernicious outcomes of Donald Trump's trade policies. This trade war with China is providing an incentive for people to burn down the Amazon rainforest to plant soybeans so that they can sell into China because China right now is looking for new producers for those soybeans that they are no longer buying from the U.S. Our focus [should be] to save the lungs of the planet that produce 6 percent of the oxygen that we breathe and to ensure that we do not trigger a crisis in the Amazon. Once it is set, we will never be able to roll back. This is our opportunity. That is the threat that we face. And so we must be an international leader on these issues.

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall marathon (10 Democrats)

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Sep 4, 2019)
Use tariffs to get China to pay the price for pollution

Q: How would you try to get China to lower its emissions?

BIDEN: We have to bring around the rest of the world. When we did the Paris accord that they signed onto, it was agreed that we would constantly up the ante. China is exporting coal technology. They're making the environment much, much worse. There has to be a price that they pay if they do that. That's why I would talk about dealing with them in terms of tariffs. But you've got to get the rest of the world in on the deal to do i

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Climate Crisis Town Hall (CNN 2019 Democratic primary)

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Free Trade Aug 25, 2019)
Invest in domestic competitiveness to stay ahead of China

My focus, in terms of a China strategy, will be identifying areas of mutual advantage and holding them accountable for the problems. Just realize that they're not going to change their fundamental economic model because we poked them with a few tariffs. That's why the ultimate way to stay ahead of China is to invest in our domestic competitiveness. Now unfortunately, we're doing the reverse, under-investing in everything from education to infrastructure here at home.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Amy Klobuchar on China: (Free Trade Aug 25, 2019)
China: we need credibility, would remove some tariffs

When you deal with the rest of the world you want to have credibility. You keep your promises and you keep your threats. What he does is he makes these blustering threats like kicking all of our companies out of China that people don't think really he's going to follow through on. What I would do is go back to the negotiating table with our allies [and] examine these tariffs. Some of them can come off; some of them could stay on and then make sure that we're using trade enforcement.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Aug 25, 2019)
Trump's actions on trade destabilizing world economy

What the president is doing is totally irrational, and it is destabilizing the entire world economy. You do not make trade policy by announcing today that you're going to raise tariffs by X-%, and the next day by Y-%, by attacking the person you appointed as head of the Federal Reserve as an enemy of the American people, by denouncing the president of China, who last year you really loved as a great leader. This kind of instability causing very serious harm to the entire world economy.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Technology Aug 25, 2019)
Mustn't let China lead world on artificial intelligence

The fundamental way to stay ahead of China is to invest in our own competitiveness. If they're investing billions more in artificial intelligence than we are, there is a very strong likelihood that they will be running circles around us by the time I have kids old enough to vote. I don't want to see artificial intelligence being led by China, knowing that their vision is about using technology for the perfection of dictatorship, very different from how these things will work in American hands.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Tim Ryan on China: (Technology Aug 25, 2019)
Chief manufacturing officer will move US on green technology

I'm talking about bringing manufacturing back and start building things like electric vehicles and solar where China right now is cleaning our clock. They control 60% of the electric vehicle market, 60% of the solar panel market. I'm going to have a chief manufacturing officer that moves us down that road, and that's resonating with people.
Click for Tim Ryan on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union interview for Dems' 2020 Veepstakes

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Free Trade Aug 18, 2019)
Americans pay the price for Trump's trade war with China

It's also a fool's errand to think you're going to be able to get China to change the fundamentals of their economic model by poking them in the eye with some tariffs. The president has failed to deliver a deal. In the meantime, we're paying the cost of these tariffs. We're going to see even more in the prices of consumer goods. There is clearly no strategy for dealing with the trade war in a way that will actually lead to results for American farmers or American consumers.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Beto O`Rourke on China: (Free Trade Aug 18, 2019)
Enforce high standards for labor, environment, human rights

We need to hold China accountable. But when have we ever gone into a military war or a trade war, without allies? Let's make sure that we bring our friends in a united front against China, to make sure that they respect the rules of the road, that they respect our economy, our farmers, and our workers. That's the best possible way to come to a conclusion that benefits our economy and ensures that we have a stable, global economy.

If we don't have high labor standards with those countries that we're trading and enforce those standards, if we don't have high environmental standards, if we don't have high standards for human rights, then we really do not have fair trade around the world. We'll make sure that those standards are high, that they're enforced, and that we have markets to which we can export what we grow and what we make in the United States.

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press interview for Democratic 2020 Veepstakes

Kirsten Gillibrand on China: (Free Trade Aug 18, 2019)
NAFTA 2.0 is a disaster; trade war harms producers

Q: Are you worried about a recession?

GILLIBRAND: I'm concerned because I think NAFTA 2.0 is a disaster. I think it was a giveaway to drug companies in Mexico. It's going to harm our jobs. President Trump said no bad trade deals. Not only has he entered into them, but he's started a trade war with China. And it's really harming producers.

Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week interview for Democratic 2020 Veepstakes

Andrew Yang on China: (Free Trade Aug 18, 2019)
Create a path forward on China that works for both sides

Q: How would you compete with China?

YANG: Tariffs and the trade war are the wrong way to go. We need to curb some of the abuses on the Chinese side. But the trade war is leading the global economy in the wrong direction. What we have to do is we have to create a path forward for the Chinese that allows them to save face and say look we need to curb your theft of intellectual property rights and here's what we can do in return. We have to create a path forward that'll work for both sides.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation interview for 2019 Democratic primary

Steve Bullock on China: (Free Trade Aug 18, 2019)
Farmers want trade, they don't want aid

Q: How would you change what Trump is doing with the economy?

BULLOCK: How I would change what he's doing with this economy is really it's America first has become America alone. When a farmer says to me, every time the president tweets, we lose hundreds of thousands of dollars. Look, we need to be tough on China, especially when it comes to tech, but what he's doing is on the back of --

Q: Do you think he's not made those farmers whole with the payments?

BULLOCK: Absolutely not. The payments won't matter if, ultimately, we do lose market share. What farmers want is to make sure that they have a market. They want trade, they don't want aid.

Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday interview for Dems' 2020 Veepstakes

Marianne Williamson on China: (Free Trade Aug 16, 2019)
Take strong position on China on human rights & business

China is aggressively engaging in theft, practicing commercial espionage, and ignoring intellectual-property rights as well as trampling on human rights and democracy in their drive to dominate global markets. The US must maintain a strong position regarding China with regard to economics, politics, and human rights. China's treatment of the Uighurs and of Hong Kong reflect their aggressive drive for domination and their disdain for human rights and democracy.
Click for Marianne Williamson on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Andrew Yang on China: (Foreign Policy Aug 9, 2019)
Provide model for democratic capitalism, not authoritarians

China obviously has great ambition, and their system of government is becoming increasingly authoritarian as they develop more technologies that allow them to monitor and control their population. It's important that we work with our allies to combat the spread of this authoritarian capitalism and provide a model for democratic capitalism. An ascendant China isn't a direct threat to the United States, as long as we are strong at home and project that confidence to developing nations.
Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Joe Biden on China: (Energy & Oil Jul 31, 2019)
Either we run world trade or China will

Q: Would you rejoin the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

BIDEN: I'd renegotiate. We make up 25% of the world's economy. Either China is going to write the rules of the road on trade or we are. We have to join with the 40% of the world we had with us, and this time make sure environmentalists and labor are there. I would not rejoin the TPP as it was initially put forward.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (second night in Detroit)

Kirsten Gillibrand on China: (Environment Jul 31, 2019)
Why not have clean air and clean water for all Americans?

I will not only sign the Paris global climate accords. The greatest threat to humanity is global climate change. We need a robust solution. When John F. Kennedy said I want to put a man on the moon in the next 10 years, not because it's easy, but because it's hard, he knew it was going to be a measure of our ability to galvanize worldwide competition. He wanted to have a space race with Russia. Why not have a green energy race with China? Why not have clean air and clean water for all Americans?
Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (second night in Detroit)

Tulsi Gabbard on China: (Free Trade Jul 31, 2019)
TPP gave away our sovereignty to international panel

Q: Many saw the Trans-Pacific Partnership as something that would be a critical tool to deal with the rise of China. You were against it. How would you ensure that the US is able to remain competitive against China?

GABBARD: By pushing for fair trade, not trade deals that give away the sovereignty of the American people and our country, that give away American jobs, and that threaten our environment. These are the three main issues with that massive trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership. I think the central one was the fact that it gave away our sovereignty to a panel of international corporations whose rulings would supersede any domestic law that we would pass, either a federal law or a state or a local law. This is extremely dangerous and goes against the very values that we have as a country. And it would have a negative impact on domestic jobs and that it lacked clear protections for our environment.

Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (second night in Detroit)

Tulsi Gabbard on China: (Free Trade Jul 31, 2019)
Don't keep Trump tariffs on China

Q: Would you keep President Trump's tariffs on China in place?

GABBARD: I would not, because the approach that President Trump has taken has been extremely volatile without any clear strategic plan, and it has a ravaging and devastating effect on our domestic manufacturers, on our farmers, who are already struggling and now failing to see the light of day because of the plan that Trump has taken.

Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (second night in Detroit)

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 30, 2019)
Accept both cooperation and conflict with China

Beijing seems committed to consolidating authoritarian capitalism as an alternative to the democratic capitalism embraced by the United States and its allies. Where necessary, we should seek cooperation with Beijing, such as in addressing climate disruption, maintaining strategic stability, combatting terrorism, and managing conflict. But the United States must defend our fundamental values, core interests, and critical alliances, and accept that this will often entail friction with China.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Joe Sestak on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 30, 2019)
Can't risk losing influence in Africa to China

Africa will be a powerhouse soon, and Africans will remember who was there for them. We must double down on meeting the continent's needs--from addressing poverty and infrastructure to developmental aid and education--or we risk losing influence in Africa to China and other countries not aligned with our values. We must also offer much more economic, financial and diplomatic support to the developing economies of Africa, and incentivize US companies to get engaged in fair, just ways.
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Seth Moulton on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 30, 2019)
Condemn China's human rights abuses

Human rights must be a key focus of our foreign policy, both with China and around the world. The United States should publicly condemn China's human rights abuses and continually raise them at the highest levels in diplomatic dialogue. We should also pursue targeted sanctions on entities and individuals who are involved in repression and make clear that we support Hong Kong's autonomy.
Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Joe Sestak on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 30, 2019)
Absence from leadership has let autocrats act with impunity

I want to restore U.S. leadership within a rules-based liberal world order that holds nations accountable for their behavior. We must regain our leadership of the values-based world order from which we have retreated. Our absence has permitted China, Russia and emerging autocrats to act with impunity, with no concerns about consequences. We need to renew our commitment to multilateral action and the international institutions we built to establish and enforce global human rights standards.
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Beto O`Rourke on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
Need allies in war, including trade wars

Q: (to Rep. Tim Ryan): Would you continue President Trump's steel tariffs, yes or no?

RYAN: I would have to re-evaluate. I think some of them are effective. But he's bungled the whole thing, obviously. Here's the problem with President Trump. He has a tactical move. What's the grand strategy for the United States? China has 100-year plan, a 50-year plan, a 20-year plan. We live in a 24-hour news cycle. That spells disaster for our economy and disaster for our global politics.

O'ROURKE: You know, the question was about tariffs. And they're a huge mistake. They constitute the largest tax increase on the American consumer, hitting the middle class and the working poor especially hard, and farmers in Iowa and across the country are bearing the brunt of the consequences. When have we ever gone to war, including a trade war, without allies and friends and partners? As president, we will hold China accountable, but we will bring our allies and friends, like the European Union, to bear.

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Joe Sestak on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
Mistake to withdraw from TPP: creates opening for China

Q: Would you support the US joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), formerly the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

SESTAK: I believe we lost an important opportunity to shape the future of global trade when we withdrew our involvement from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. While that trade agreement was far from perfect, it gave us the chance to set the rules of engagement across a critically important region, within a framework that does not include China. Our withdrawal sent a worrying signal to our regional friends and allies. In the absence of US global leadership, China will inevitably fill the vacuum.

Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Tim Ryan on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
China steals intellectual property; out compete 'em

Q: President Trump's tariffs have boosted the U.S. steel industry but hurt auto manufacturers like those here in Michigan, which could drive up the cost of cars. As president, would you continue President Trump's steel tariffs?

RYAN: I think President Trump was onto something when he talked about China. China has been abusing the economic system for a long time. They steal intellectual property. They subsidize goods coming into this country. They've displaced steel workers, auto workers, across the board, eroded our manufacturing. And we basically transferred our wealth of our middle class either up to the top 1% or to China for them to build their military. So I think we need some targeted response against China. But you know how you beat China? You out-compete 'em. And that's why I'd put a chief manufacturing officer in place to make sure that we rebuild the manufacturing base.

Click for Tim Ryan on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Seth Moulton on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
Deals must help Americans & protect intellectual property

We need to take on China but do so in a smart way. That means working towards a trade deal that helps Americans and American workers; building a cyber wall to keep our intellectual property safe in the face of Chinese aggression; and establishing a Pacific version of NATO to counter the growing security threat China poses to the region.
Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Seth Moulton on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
China steps in when US doesn't lead on trade deals

Under Trump, we've seen what happens when the United States doesn't lead in these multilateral efforts: China steps in and tries to remake the world in their autocratic, illiberal image. For that reason and more, my administration would re-engage in the TPP negotiations, focusing on strengthening labor and environmental standards. The goal must be to conclude a strong, fair trade deal for the Pacific on our terms, not China's.
Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

John Delaney on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
Obama was right on supporting Trans-Pacific Partnership

I'm the only one running for president who actually supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership. We can't isolate ourselves from the world. We have to engage with fair, rules-based trade. That was the Trans-Pacific Partnership. I think President Obama was right. He did include environmental standards. He did include labor standards. We would be in an entirely different position with China if we had entered the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Click for John Delaney on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Tim Ryan on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
China steals intellectual property & steals steel jobs

Q: What about President Trump's trade war with China?

RYAN: China has been abusing the economic system for a long time. They steal intellectual property. They subsidize goods coming into this country. They've displaced steel workers, auto workers, across the board, eroded our manufacturing. I think we need some targeted response against China. But you know how you beat China? You out-compete 'em. I'd put a chief manufacturing officer in place to make sure that we rebuild the manufacturing base.

Q: Would you continue President Trump's steel tariffs, yes or no?

RYAN: I would have to re-evaluate. I think some of them are effective. But he's bungled the whole thing, obviously. Here's the problem with President Trump. He has a tactical move. What's the grand strategy for the United States? China has 100-year plan, a 50-year plan, a 30-year plan, a 20-year plan. We live in a 24-hour news cycle. That spells disaster for our economy and disaster for our global politics.

Click for Tim Ryan on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

John Hickenlooper on China: (Free Trade Jul 30, 2019)
No trade war in history ever had a winner

You talk to any economist, there is not a single example in history where a trade war had a winner. Trade wars are for losers. And the bottom line is we've got to recognize, let's negotiate a better trade deal. You're not going to win against China in a trade war when they've got 25% of our total debt. We're paying in tariffs about $800 to $1,200 per household and then we give this incredible tax cut to the rich. Tariffs are not the solution.
Click for John Hickenlooper on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Joe Sestak on China: (War & Peace Jul 30, 2019)
Leaving Iran deal saps credibility in future negotiations

[Obama's Iran nuclear] deal was good enough to be supported by all of our European allies, along with Russia and China, and Iran itself. Iran was abiding by its terms. If the deal had been given the chance to hold for the full decade, it would have created a reservoir of goodwill between Iran and the world that would be the basis for the next agreement. Our leaving not only destroyed a carefully crafted international agreement, it sapped our credibility in negotiations with other countries.
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Kirsten Gillibrand on China: (Free Trade Jul 17, 2019)
Don't use tariffs to pressure countries

Kirsten Gillibrand on Tariffs: Don't use tariffs to pressure countries.

FIVE CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Joseph Biden, Jr.; Steve Bullock; Peter Buttigieg; Kamala Harris; Beto O`Rourke.

The majority of Democrats have broadly slammed Trump's use of tariffs. Candidates such as Sens. Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand have criticized the president's move to impose tariffs on China and U.S. allies, arguing they hurt American consumers, workers and companies.

Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Steve Bullock on China: (Free Trade Jul 17, 2019)
Don't use tariffs to pressure countries

Bullock on Tariffs: Don't use tariffs to pressure countries.

FIVE CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Joe Biden; Peter Buttigieg; Kirsten Gillibrand; Kamala Harris; Beto O`Rourke.

The majority of Democrats have broadly slammed Trump's use of tariffs. Harris and Gillibrand say tariffs on China and U.S. allies hurt American consumers, workers and companies. Joe Biden and other candidates have argued that farmers and manufacturers are feeling the brunt of Trump's trade wars.

Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Free Trade Jul 17, 2019)
Don't use tariffs to pressure countries

Buttigieg on Tariffs: Don't use tariffs to pressure countries.

FIVE CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Joe Biden; Steve Bullock; Kirsten Gillibrand; Kamala Harris; Beto O`Rourke.

The majority of Democrats have broadly slammed Trump's use of tariffs. Harris and Gillibrand say tariffs on China and U.S. allies hurt American consumers, workers and companies. Joe Biden and other candidates have argued that farmers and manufacturers are feeling the brunt of Trump's trade wars.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Kamala Harris on China: (Free Trade Jul 17, 2019)
Don't use tariffs to pressure countries

Kamala Harrison Tariffs: Don't use tariffs to pressure countries.

FIVE CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Joseph Biden, Jr.; Steve Bullock; Peter Buttigieg; Kirsten Gillibrand; Beto O`Rourke.

The majority of Democrats have broadly slammed Trump's use of tariffs. Candidates such as Sens. Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand have criticized the president's move to impose tariffs on China and U.S. allies, arguing they hurt American consumers, workers and companies.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Beto O`Rourke on China: (Free Trade Jul 17, 2019)
Don't use tariffs to pressure countries

O`Rourke on Tariffs: Don't use tariffs to pressure countries.

FIVE CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Joe Biden; Steve Bullock; Peter Buttigieg; Kirsten Gillibrand; Kamala Harris.

The majority of Democrats have broadly slammed Trump's use of tariffs. Harris and Gillibrand say tariffs on China and U.S. allies hurt American consumers, workers and companies. Joe Biden and other candidates have argued that farmers and manufacturers are feeling the brunt of Trump's trade wars.

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Joe Sestak on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 16, 2019)
Procurement of Chinese tech endangers national security

Countering geopolitical threats from China should be done in concert with America's allies, advised Sestak. "We need our allies. It's not just us with China. The greatest power we have is the ability to lead people around our values and how we want the rules to be done." America's procurement of certain technologies from China with military applications undermines national security, assessed Sestak. "Or if you own an Android phone, everything you're talking on is going back to China."
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Breitbart.com on 2020 Democratic primary

Joe Biden on China: (Free Trade Jul 11, 2019)
Push for agreements that don't hurt consumers or business

Biden said he'd push for trade agreements that don't hamper the international exchange of goods but don't disadvantage American consumers or business, while also holding China accountable for intellectual property abuses. "There's not going to be a back to business-as-usual on trade," he said. "We need new rules. We need new processes."
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Seattle Times on 2019 Democratic primary

Amy Klobuchar on China: (Free Trade Jun 30, 2019)
China trade problems are real; use allies, not broad tariffs

I would acknowledge the problem here. The surveillance, the intellectual property violations are basically stealing our blueprints, what they have done when it comes to subsidizing industries and manipulating their currency. I would do is to work with our allies and to push them. You have to keep at it methodically. I wouldn't have used the approach they've used. Yes, targeted tariffs, but they have used basically a meat cleaver.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview

Amy Klobuchar on China: (Free Trade Jun 30, 2019)
Can't just talk about trade war with China, get it done

I'm in a very heavy ag state. Iowa, my neighbor is a heavy ag state, North Dakota. I've talked to farmers in those areas and what they tell me is they're not going to get that soybean market back in one year because that market has gone to farmers in other countries [due to Trump's tariffs]. And so that's why there's an urgency to this when we have an $891 billion trade deficit--which is the worst that we've seen--you can't just keep talking about it. You actually have to get it done.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview series

Michael Bennet on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 27, 2019)
Russian election interference is biggest geopolitical threat

The biggest threat to our national security right now is Russia, not China. On China, I think the president has been right to push back but has done it in completely the wrong way. We should mobilize the entire rest of the world, who all have a shared interest in pushing back on China's mercantilist trade policies, and I think we can do that.
Click for Michael Bennet on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (second night in Miami)

Andrew Yang on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 27, 2019)
Russia has been hacking our democracy for years

Q: What is the greatest geopolitical threat facing the United States?

Sen. Michel BENNET (D-CO): The biggest threat to our national security right now is Russia, not China. When I see these kids [being separated from their families] at the border, I see my mom, because she was separated from her parents during the Holocaust in Poland. For Donald Trump to be doing what he's doing to children and families at the border, the president has turned the border of the United States into a symbol of nativist hostility when we should be represented by the Statue of Liberty. We need to make a change.

Andrew YANG: I just want to agree that I think Russia is our greatest geopolitical threat, because they have been hacking our democracy successfully and they've been laughing their asses off about it for the last couple of years. We should focus on that before we start worrying about other threats.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (second night in Miami)

Andrew Yang on China: (Free Trade Jun 27, 2019)
We need to crack down, but tariffs & trade wars are wrong

On China, they do pirate our intellectual property. It's a massive problem. But the tariffs and the trade war are just punishing businesses and producers and workers on both sides.

The beneficiaries have not been American workers or people in China. It's been Southeast Asia and other producers that have then stepped into the void. We need to crack down on Chinese malfeasance in the trade relationship, but the tariffs and the trade war are the wrong way to go.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (second night in Miami)

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Free Trade Jun 27, 2019)
Tariffs are taxes; we pay $800 a year for Trump's tariffs

We've got to recognize that the China challenge is serious but their fundamental economic model isn't going to change because of some tariffs. Tariffs are taxes. Americans are going to pay on average $800 more a year because of these tariffs. Meanwhile, China is investing in artificial intelligence. This president is fixated on the China relationship as if all that mattered was the export balance on dishwashers. We've got a much bigger issue on our hands.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (second night in Miami)

Amy Klobuchar on China: (War & Peace Jun 26, 2019)
Require that Trump consult Congress before war with Iran

Trump has made us less safe than we were when he became president. So what I would do is stand with our allies, and not give unlimited leverage to China and Russia, which is what he has done.

I would make sure that if there is any possibility of a conflict--and we're having this debate in Congress right now--that he comes to Congress for an authorization of military force. I would do that.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (first night in Miami)

Mike Pence on China: (Energy & Oil Jun 23, 2019)
Fighting climate change should not increase utility rates

Q: Do you believe think human-induced climate emergency is a threat to the United States?

Pence: We will always follow the science on that in this administration. What we won't do -- and the Clean Power Plan was all about that -- was hamstring energy in this country, raising the cost of utility rates for working families across this country while other nations like China and India absolutely do nothing or make illusory promises decades down the road to deal with it.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union 2019 interview

Joe Sestak on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 23, 2019)
Reverse America's retreat from the global community

Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website JoeSestak.com

Joe Sestak on China: (Free Trade Jun 23, 2019)
Stop using tariffs as weapon in disputes with China

The economic pain currently being felt by farmers and others due to the ongoing trade war with China is evidence of the importance of good trade policy to the lives and livelihoods of countless Americans. I believe we must not use tariffs as a weapon in geopolitical disputes that have nothing to do with trade policy. Our national economy relies on a stable global economy that functions under predictable rules of engagement. Businesses make decisions every day that will impact their operations for years to come, so they will only take the kinds of risks that lead to greater success when they know they won't be taken by surprise with sudden tariffs.

It is imperative that we be in a position to compete with China, our only major economic rival, for their business. China is rapidly pursuing economic expansion around the globe, but without the same standards for the environment, labor rights, and intellectual property enforcement that our societal norms and values rightly demand.

Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website JoeSestak.com

Joe Sestak on China: (Technology Jun 23, 2019)
Reprioritized defense funding toward cyberspace

Chosen to serve on two bi-partisan national security Select Congressional Committees, Sestak worked on refocusing our security force posture toward China, advocating a new emphasis on cyberspace warfare, and reprioritization of defense funding toward such newly emerging warfare capability areas, with a reformed accountable defense procurement system. Joe also supported energy development legislation for renewables, with environmental safeguards and job creation, to address Climate Change.
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website JoeSestak.com

Donald Trump on China: (Homeland Security Jun 16, 2019)
Would take info on opponents from foreigners, might call FBI

Q: If foreigners, if Russia, if China, if someone else offers you information on opponents, should they accept it or should they call the FBI?

Trump: I think maybe you do both. I think you might want to listen. There's nothing wrong with listening. If somebody called from a country, Norway, "We have information on your opponent." Oh, I think I'd want to hear it. It's not an interference. They have information. I think I'd take it. If I thought there was something wrong, I'd go maybe to the FBI. The FBI doesn't have enough agents to take care of it, but you go and talk honestly to congressmen. They all do it; they always have.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interview on Foreign Influences

Donald Trump on China: (Principles & Values Jun 16, 2019)
Foreign-provided opposition info? Read it; maybe call FBI

STEPHANOPOULOS: Your campaign this time around, if foreigners, if Russia, if China, if someone else offers you information on opponents, should they accept it or should they call the FBI?

TRUMP: I think maybe you do both. I think you might want to listen. There's nothing wrong with listening. If somebody called from a country, Norway, "We have information on your opponent." Oh, I think I'd want to hear it.

STEPHANOPOULOS: You want that kind of interference in our elections?

TRUMP: It's not an interference. They have information. I think I'd take it. If I thought there was something wrong, I'd go maybe to the FBI. If I thought there was something wrong. But when somebody comes up with oppo research, right, that they come up with oppo research. "Oh, let's call the FBI." The FBI doesn't have enough agents to take care of it, but you go and talk honestly to congressmen, they all do it, they always have. And that's the way it is. It's called oppo research.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interview on impeaching Trump

Pete Buttigieg on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 11, 2019)
Foreign policy grounded in American interests for 2050s

I often speak of the need for our politics and policies to contemplate the year 2054, the year in which I hope to retire. Thinking about the world three to four decades from now is exactly how we need to compete with countries like China, because that is how they are thinking, planning, and investing. To cope with enormous change, American foreign policy for the future must be securely grounded in American values, American interests, and American relationships.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website, PeteForAmerica.com

Justin Amash on China: (Principles & Values May 20, 2019)
Nobody wins in a trade war

The Michigan Congressman has opposed declaring America's border crisis a national emergency, has opposed the repeal and replace of Obamacare, and told a Young Americans for Liberty conference that all options were on the table in terms of replacing Trump as the GOP nominee in 2020. He has also defended allowing China to continue ravaging the U.S. economy by declaring: "Trade wars are bad, and nobody wins".
Click for Justin Amash on other issues.   Source: Human Events magazine, "China & 'Impeach Trump' Amash"

Tulsi Gabbard on China: (Foreign Policy May 19, 2019)
We need to engage in diplomacy & deescalate tensions

Nuclear strategists point out that we are at a greater risk of nuclear war now than ever before in history. And this is what I seek to change; to build relationships that are built on cooperation rather than conflict, deescalate these tensions, work out the differences that we have. We've got to be able to work with countries like Russia and China to be able to accomplish that objective to keep the American people safe.
Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interview of presidential hopefuls

Steve Bullock on China: (Free Trade May 19, 2019)
Work with other nations to deal with China's practices

We need to be tough on China. Let's not kid ourselves on that. But 25% tariffs on all Chinese products, every American family will be hit by $2,000 in one year in increased prices. America first has become America alone. We can't do it that way. We need to bring our allies together and some of our adversaries. We need to actually enforce through the World Trade Organization, when appropriate, as well.
Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2019 interview of presidential hopefuls

Howie Hawkins on China: (War & Peace May 19, 2019)
Endless war follows from capitalist competition

ENDLESS WAR: We will never have a secure peace as long as capitalism's competitive economic structure generates international conflicts and wars. Nuclear-armed capitalist states--including the US, Russia, and China--compete for resources, markets, cheap labor, and geopolitical military positioning. If we don't replace capitalism's nationalistic competition with socialism's international cooperation, sooner or later these conflicts will end in nuclear annihilation.
Click for Howie Hawkins on other issues.   Source: 2020 Presidential Campaign website HowieHawkins.us

Steve Bullock on China: (Free Trade May 15, 2019)
End reckless trade war with China

Bullock has criticized President Donald Trump for his "reckless" trade war with China, which has hit farmers in rural states like Montana particularly hard. As governor, Bullock led trade missions to China, South Korea and Taiwan. He is largely viewed as pro-business and has advocated for cautious government spending. As governor, Bullock launched economic initiatives aimed at boosting local businesses and economic productivity in rural communities.
Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: PBS News Hour 2020, "Where the candidate stands on 9 issues"

Kamala Harris on China: (Foreign Policy May 12, 2019)
US stronger when working with allies

Q: What do you think of Trump's foreign relations?

A: Part of the failure is that this president and administration have failed to understand that we are stronger when we work with our allies on every issue, China included.

Q: China is an ally?

A: No, meaning working with our allies to address China, in terms of the threat that it presents. This president has a preference for conducting policy by tweet. It is a display of a president who thinks that unilateral action is better than working with friends. It puts us in a weaker position.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2019 interview of presidential hopefuls

Michael Bennet on China: (Free Trade May 12, 2019)
Chinese trade practices unfair, but tariffs not the answer

What I would do differently is mobilize the world against China's mercantilist trading policies, which the President is right to point out have been unfair. But putting tariffs on our allies, putting tariffs on even the Chinese that are actually taxes on American producers, American farmers, taxes on the American consumer and taxes on the American worker, I think are completely the wrong way of doing this.
Click for Michael Bennet on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interviews of presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade May 12, 2019)
Says China is paying BIG TARIFFS, but U.S. consumers pay

The most recent round of trade talks with China ended this week with no final agreement, following Trump's decision to more than double tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods. Trump said that China should "act now" to wrap up a trade deal with the U.S, warning that "far worse" terms would be offered to them in what he predicted would be his second term as president. Trump also suggested that the U.S. was "collecting" big tariffs from China: "Would be wise for them to act now, but love collecting BIG TARIFFS!" he tweeted.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow acknowledged that the Chinese do not directly pay tariffs on goods coming into the US, but instead American importers pay and oftentimes pass it on to US consumers, contradicting Pres. Trump's claims. Kudlow said that "both sides will suffer on this," but argued that China will suffer significant GDP losses as export markets are hit. The blow to US GDP won't be substantial since the economy is "in terrific shape," he said.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNBC's coverage of Trump Promises, "China Tariffs"

Stacey Abrams on China: (Foreign Policy May 10, 2019)
Concerned China building infrastructure, relationships

What China is doing with infrastructure, it is deeply concerning because that type of largess comes with obligations. There is a good to building infrastructure in place where colonization and disinvestment has disrupted development. But I think we should be deeply concerned about how it's coming into being. We need to be prepared to intercede when the bill comes due. Because China understands what they're doing. They are building out not only infrastructure but relationships.
Click for Stacey Abrams on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2022 Georgia Governor race

Wayne Messam on China: (Jobs Apr 9, 2019)
Invest in training the entrepreneurs of today and tomorrow

When I'm President, repealing the Trump tax breaks for the wealthy will be at the top of my agenda. I've built a small business, and as Mayor, overseen one of the fastest growing economies in the nation. I championed a living wage for city workers, attracted high-paying jobs for Floridians, fought to bring manufacturing jobs back from China, and created jobs myself.

It's time we had a President who invests in training the entrepreneurs of today and tomorrow. Under my administration, we would bring uncertainty for American workers and businesses to an end, by pushing to make it illegal to shut down the government to score political points.

When I'm President, we will establish an economic plan to soften the blow of the coming tech advancements on working and middle class Americans, and will encourage young people to start their own businesses as a pathway to success and alternative to college.

Click for Wayne Messam on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website WayneForUSA.com

Tim Ryan on China: (Jobs Apr 7, 2019)
Public/private partnership to rebuild manufacturing base

My focus is going to be on creating an industrial policy in the United States. We are getting our clocks cleaned by China right now when it comes to electric vehicles. There's two million electric vehicle cars now, there's going to be thirty million in 2030. Who's going to make those cars? I want us to be making those cars in America. You sit down with the private sector. You work with the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation. You sit down and you put a long-term strategy together and then you work with the venture capital community, so that the investments are driven into distressed communities. It's going to be a public-private partnership. It's not going to be all government; no centralized planning and it's not going to be all free market.
Click for Tim Ryan on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interviews of presidential hopefuls

Seth Moulton on China: (Homeland Security Mar 31, 2019)
Focus on cybersecurity to deal with real threats to US

National security is not just about preventing Russia from invading us with tanks into Western Europe. Russia is trying to hack our elections. China is attacking us through the Internet every single day and stealing our business ideas and our military -- that's where a lot of American jobs are going. Rather than build this fifth century ridiculous border wall on the southern border, let's talk about a cyber wall that will stop Russia and China from interfering in our business.
Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union 2019 on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Foreign Policy Mar 15, 2019)
Alliances make us stronger & better able to face China

If you wanted to push back against China, your first move would not be to pick a fight with Canada and our other allies. We have a lot of trading partners who are good allies, and we should make sure that we are working with our allies. That's what makes us stronger internationally. And many of our allies are just as worried about China as we are. We need to be working with them as we go forward.
Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: NPR Morning Edition, "Election 2020: Opening Arguments"

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Free Trade Mar 15, 2019)
We need to do trading deals differently & help workers

Q: Obama wanted to unite U.S. allies against China with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but you oppose TPP, right?

Warren: I think that was a trading deal that was not good for the American people and not good for the American worker. It was a trading deal that was written in order to help giant corporations. Over and over the United States has been negotiating one deal after another that helps giant multi-national corporations but does not help American workers, does not help Americans small businesses, does not help American farmers. We need to do our trading deals very differently.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: NPR Morning Edition, "Election 2020: Opening Arguments"

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Free Trade Mar 15, 2019)
We need allies to stand up to China on trade issues

[Trump] is right that we have a problem with China. What he hasn't seemed to figure out is what's the strategy to deal with it. If you wanted to push back, your first move would not be to pick a fight with Canada and other allies. We have a lot of trading partners who are good allies, and we should make sure that ... we are working with our allies. That's what makes us stronger internationally. Many of our allies are just as worried about China as we are. We need to be working with them.
Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: NPR Morning Edition: Election 2020 Special Series

John Hickenlooper on China: (Free Trade Mar 4, 2019)
No tariffs on goods from China and Europe

Click for John Hickenlooper on other issues.   Source: PBS News hour on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Corporations Mar 2, 2019)
Companies will pay dearly for moving jobs out of US

A country announces they're closing their plant, going to move to Mexico. They're going to move to China. They're going to move someplace else. They fire all their workers. And then they sell their cars, no tax; just make them in Mexico, sell them back to here. Those days are all gone. In the new deal with Mexico and Canada, it's very, very hard for a company to fire its 4,000 workers and move to Mexico or some other location. They can do it, I guess, if they want. But it's costly. It's painful.

Last year, we lost 800--this for many years--almost $800 billion on trade. It's not sustainable. You can't do that. And now we're making great trade deals. I say, India is a very high-tariff nation. They charge us a lot. When we send a motorcycle to India, it's 100 percent tariff. They charge 100 percent. When India sends a motorcycle to us, we brilliantly charge them nothing. I want a reciprocal tax, or at least I want to charge a tax. It's called a mirror tax, but it's a reciprocal tax.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: White House press release, "Remarks at CPAC 2019"

Bill Weld on China: (Immigration Feb 15, 2019)
Guest worker program rather than path to citizenship

We should adopt a robust guest worker program, to assist our agricultural and construction industries, particularly in the western states. We don't need a path to citizenship for eleven million people, but we do need more and longer work visas. Under the current regime, we're simply educating our competition in our graduate schools, and then sending them home to China and other economic competitors of the U.S. We may not need a long impenetrable wall, but we do need short-term bridges.
Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Speech in New Hampshire by 2020 presidential hopefuls

Howard Schultz on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 12, 2019)
China is not an ally, but we need to work with them

I don't believe China is our ally. But I also do not believe China is our enemy. China is a fierce competitor of the United States. There are areas that are in our national interest to cooperate with China. We need China's cooperation to help solve the problem of North Korea. We need China's cooperation specifically with lots of other nations, with regard to doing everything we can to solve the climate change issue.
Click for Howard Schultz on other issues.   Source: CNN Town Hall: 2020 presidential hopefuls

Howard Schultz on China: (Free Trade Feb 12, 2019)
Trump's tariff war is a strategic mistake

The trade and the tariff war that President Trump has started is a strategic mistake. This war has resulted on a tax on U.S. consumers on lots of goods and services. Every farmer, everyone within the agricultural industry, everyone in the steel industry has lost markets that will not come back for years. Most importantly, we have damaged an important diplomatic relationship with China.
Click for Howard Schultz on other issues.   Source: CNN Town Hall: 2020 presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Feb 5, 2019)
Real problem with trade is jobs shipped overseas

Tonight, Trump talked about what a great job he has done on trade. But what he forgot to tell you is that the annual trade deficit has gone up by over $100 billion since he became president and our trade deficit with China and Mexico has gone up by tens of billions of dollars. Meanwhile, since Trump was elected corporations have shipped 185,000 American jobs overseas.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Progressive response to 2019 State of the Union speech

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Feb 5, 2019)
Tariffs on $250B of Chinese goods: Treasury gains billions

To build on our incredible economic success, one priority is paramount--reversing decades of calamitous trade policies.

We are now making it clear to China that after years of targeting our industries, and stealing our intellectual property, the theft of American jobs and wealth has come to an end.

Therefore, we recently imposed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese goods--and now our Treasury is receiving billions of dollars a month from a country that never gave us a dime. But I don't blame China for taking advantage of us--I blame our leaders and representatives for allowing this travesty to happen. I have great respect for President Xi, and we are now working on a new trade deal with China. But it must include real, structural change to end unfair trade practices, reduce our chronic trade deficit, and protect American jobs.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2019 State of the Union address to United States Congress

John Delaney on China: (Free Trade Feb 4, 2019)
Supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Click for John Delaney on other issues.   Source: PBS News hour on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Ron DeSantis on China: (Free Trade Oct 9, 2018)
Trump's tariffs will get concessions from China

Q: Support Trump's imposition of tariffs on Chinese steel & other products?

Ron DeSantis (R): Yes. Trump is a master negotiator trying to get concessions.

Andrew Gillum (D): No. "He's threatening Florida's workers, farmers, & companies."

Click for Ron DeSantis on other issues.   Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Florida Governor race

Beto O`Rourke on China: (Free Trade Oct 9, 2018)
Tariffs on China will devastate our economy

Q: Support Trump's imposition of tariffs on steel & other products?

Ted Cruz (R): No. Also opposed federal aid given to TX farmers hurt by trade retaliation.

Beto O'Rourke (D): No. They "will devastate our state, businesses, & economy."

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Texas Senate race

Donald Trump on China: (Technology Sep 17, 2018)
Let US companies work in China with proprietary technology

Trump's second round of tariffs on imports worth $200 billion--and a threat that the US would "immediately pursue phase three" if China retaliates--shows his administration's determination to force Beijing to allow US companies to operate in China as Chinese companies can in America. China restricts foreign participation in key sectors including media and car manufacturing, under Beijing's agreement to join the WTO in 2001. In many cases, these restrictions force foreign companies to form joint ventures and turn over proprietary technologies to their local partners to tap the Chinese market.

"For months, we have urged China to change these unfair practices, and give fair and reciprocal treatment to American companies," Trump said in a statement. "We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly. But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices."

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: South China Morning Post on 2018 Trump Administration

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Jul 15, 2018)
European Union is a foe in trade, & in lack of NATO payments

Q: Who is your biggest competitor, your biggest foe globally right now?

TRUMP: Well, I think we have a lot of foes. I think the European Union is a foe, what they do to us in trade. Now, you wouldn't think of the European Union, but they're a foe. Russia is a foe in certain respects. China is a foe economically, certainly. They're a foe. But that doesn't mean they're bad. It means that they're competitors. They want to do well, and we want to do well. And we're starting to do well.

Q: A lot of people might be surprised to hear you list the E.U. as a foe before China and Russia.

TRUMP: No, I look at them all. Look, E.U. is very difficult, I want to tell you. Don't forget, both of my parents were born in E.U. sectors, OK? I mean, my mother was Scotland. My father, Germany. And, you know, I love those countries. I respect the leaders of those countries. But, in a trade sense, they have really taken advantage of us, & many of those countries are in NATO. And they weren't paying their bills.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2018 interviews of 2020 hopefuls

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 11, 2018)
Led bipartisan opposition to China's election interference

A bipartisan group of 12 senators has written a letter to senior Trump administration officials, urging them to craft a "comprehensive strategy" to counter covert Chinese interference in democracies around the world. Led by Cortez Masto, the lawmakers outlined the growing threat that Chinese Communist Party activities pose to independent democratic institutions.

Democratic heavyweight Elizabeth Warren is a signatory to the letter, as is Chris Coons (D-DE) and Republican centrist Cory Gardner. The letter's wide spectrum of support suggests that, unlike the investigation into Russian meddling, future attempts to uncover Chinese actions in the United States may have a bipartisan character.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: The Daily Beast on 2018 Massachusetts Senate race

John Kasich on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 6, 2018)
China is converting economic power into regional influence

China wants to push the US out of the western Pacific, undermine our alliances in the region, and re-create a Sinocentric sphere of influence in Asia free from challenges to its authoritarian rule.

Beijing is already seeking to convert its economic power into regional influence through such projects as the Belt and Road Initiative, a massive infrastructure venture, and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, a rival to Western-led development banks.

Confounding our hopes and expectations, China's regime has managed to deliver economic growth without being forced to democratize. But China is not 12 feet tall: its economy has serious structural flaws, including exceedingly high levels of debt, a cohort of retirees whose living expenses will be difficult to fund, and wages that are increasingly uncompetitive with those paid by China's neighbors. Nor is China a monolith: like the U.S., the country is riven by rival factions, leading to infighting that diverts productive resources.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 6, 2018)
Opportunity to cooperate with China instead of containment

China does not need to be contained as the Soviet Union once did, since its provocative behavior is already driving some of its neighbors into our arms. Indeed, through its actions, Beijing can largely be counted on to contain itself.

Another difference between the rivalry with China today and that with the Soviet Union during the Cold War is that China and the United States are so economically intertwined. This means not only that the two countries will remain co-dependent for the foreseeable future but also that relations between them need not be a zero-sum game. There are ample opportunities to pursue strategies with China that can adapt the world system to reflect Beijing's growing international role while benefiting both sides. Those opportunities include reining in North Korea, addressing climate change, and promoting international investment and economic growth.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on China: (Free Trade Jun 6, 2018)
Combat Chinese dumping and currency manipulation

There are limits to how much can be achieved through cooperation [with China]. We should acknowledge our rivalry with China more frankly and prepare our country to compete more vigorously. This does not necessarily mean embarking on a path of outright confrontation. Rather, it means putting hopes of a peaceful political evolution in China on the back burner and incentivizing Beijing to play a constructive role in the international system. It also means being prepared to decisively counter Chinese moves that threaten the United States and its allies.

The State Department should better protect our economic interests by combating Chinese dumping and currency manipulation, streamlining the World Trade Organization's dispute-resolution process, and insisting on full reciprocity in market access.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on China: (Free Trade Jun 6, 2018)
Support TPP to eliminate 18,000 foreign tariffs on US goods

Without greater confidence about their future place in the global economy, Americans will have little reason to support international cooperation and engagement. If the US continues to go it alone, however, that will only open up further opportunities for nations that do not have our best interests at heart, such as China and Russia, to shape our future for us. That's why it was such a mistake for the Trump administration to turn its back on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would have eliminated 18,000 foreign tariffs currently imposed on products that Americans make and seek to sell overseas. Those tariffs hold back job creation, and eliminating them could unleash new growth across the US. We shouldn't have threatened to jettison NAFTA either. Instead, we should work with our neighbors and partners to modernize these agreements. On trade, as on many other issues, the goal should be to find win-win solutions, not to make threats and try to divide and conquer.
Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on China: (War & Peace Jun 6, 2018)
Balance cooperation and confrontation with China

To deal with the rise of China, we must strike the right balance between cooperation and confrontation. In other words, the world needs more American engagement, not less.

Looking to fill the political void created by the current vacuum in US international leadership, Chinese leaders are making ridiculous assertions that their country will define the meaning of freedom and liberty.

The principal strategic challenge for the US is to integrate China into the international system in a manner that allows us to protect our interests in Asia and safeguard international institutions against China's assaults on democratic values. China's ultimate goal is to end what it considers to be American dominance and to replace it with a new order in which Beijing gets an equal voice in setting the rules. It wants to push the US out of the western Pacific, undermine our alliances in the region, and re-create a Sinocentric sphere of influence in Asia free from challenges to its authoritarian rule.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on China: (War & Peace Jun 6, 2018)
Forward-deploy US forces in the Pacific to challenge China

China does not need to be contained as the Soviet Union once did during the Cold War [but] deterring China also has a military dimension. The U.S. military should forward-deploy greater numbers of forces in the western Pacific and continue to challenge China's illegal attempts to expand its territorial control there. Washington should make it clear that there will be a significant price to pay for any attack on U.S. assets in space and expand our regional allies' missile and air defense capabilities. In the long run, however, the best chance for peace lies in a China that itself chooses reform. To kick-start that process, we will have to support efforts to give mass audiences in China better access to the unvarnished truth about what is going on in the world.
Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

Mike Bloomberg on China: (Free Trade Apr 18, 2018)
Punitive tariffs harms us, kills jobs, strains relations

Bloomberg will lobby against Trump's plans to impose punitive tariffs on goods from China. "Leaders in Washington are considering new trade policies that would unfortunately harm our economy, would kill jobs, would slow innovation, and strain ties with nations around the world, including China, and we cannot let that happen," the business community leader said. "Other countries around the world, again, including China, are responding with their tariffs and we don't need a trade war."
Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: South China Morning Post on 2019 Democratic primary

Donald Trump on China: (Drugs Mar 11, 2018)
Death penalty for drug dealers

Q: At a rally last night, the president made the case for the death penalty for drug dealers. Let's listen to this.

(VIDEO CLIP): TRUMP: When I was in China and other places, I said, "Mr. President, do you have a drug problem?" "No, no, no, we do not." I said, "huh, big country, 1.4 billion people, right? Not much a drug problem." I said, "What do you attribute that to?" "Well, the death penalty." So, honestly, I don't know that the United States, frankly, is ready for it. They should be ready for it.

(END VIDEO) Q: Now, the death penalty for drug dealers, is that something that you agree with? And should we be following China's lead when it comes to criminal justice?

Sen. Ron JOHNSON (R-WI): I would say we probably should not be following China's lead when it comes to criminal justice. I'm a supporter of the death penalty, but only where we absolutely are 100% certain that the person is 100% guilty. I'm not sure it would be applicable to drug offenses.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN 2018 interviews of 2020 hopefuls

Xi Jinping on China: (Government Reform Feb 26, 2018)
Ended presidential term limits, consolidating power

China moved to end a two-term limit on the Presidency, clearing the way for Xi to rule the country for as long as he, and his peers, can abide. The decision marks the clearest expression of Xi's core beliefs--his impatience with affectations of liberalism, his belief in the Communist Party's moral superiority, and his unromantic conception of politics as a contest between force and the forced. Decades after Deng Xiaoping warned against "the leadership of a single person," China is re-entering a period in which the fortunes of a fifth of humanity hinge on the visions, impulses, and insecurities of a solitary figure. The end of Presidential term limits risks closing a period in Chinese history, from 2004 to today, when the orderly, institutionalized transfer of power set it apart from other authoritarian states.
Click for Xi Jinping on other issues.   Source: Evan Osnos, "President for Life" in The New Yorker

Donald Trump on China: (Homeland Security Jan 30, 2018)
Unmatched power is key to defense, including more nukes

Around the world, we face rogue regimes, terrorist groups, and rivals like China and Russia that challenge our interests, our economy, and our values. In confronting these dangers, we know that weakness is the surest path to conflict, and unmatched power is the surest means of our defense.

For this reason, I am asking the Congress to end the dangerous defense sequester and fully fund our great military.

As part of our defense, we must modernize and rebuild our nuclear arsenal, hopefully never having to use it, but making it so strong and powerful that it will deter any acts of aggression. Perhaps someday in the future there will be a magical moment when the countries of the world will get together to eliminate their nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, we are not there yet.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2018 State of the Union address

Jay Inslee on China: (Energy & Oil Jan 9, 2018)
Supports carbon tax

Many states and nations have enacted a price on carbon. Even China is getting on board, having recently launched the largest carbon market on the planet. By passing a carbon tax, we would simply join our West Coast neighbors, and the rest of the world, as the global economy moves away from fossil fuels and toward a decarbonized, clean-energy future. And I believe that Washington is exactly the state to lead the clean-energy economy and seize the jobs that China and other nations are clamoring for.
Click for Jay Inslee on other issues.   Source: 2018 Washington State of the State address

Bernie Sanders on China: (Energy & Oil Sep 21, 2017)
Climate change is issue for entire international community

At a time when climate change is causing devastating problems here in America and around the world, foreign policy is about whether we work with the international community--with China, Russia, India and countries around the world-- to transform our energy systems away from fossil fuel to energy efficiency and sustainable energy. Sensible foreign policy understands that climate change is a real threat to every country on earth, that it is not a hoax, and that no country alone can effectively combat it. It is an issue for the entire international community, and an issue that the United States should be leading in, not ignoring or denying.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Westminster College speech in Where We Go From Here, p. 94

John Kasich on China: (Foreign Policy Apr 25, 2017)
FactCheck: Yes, U.S. economy bigger than next two combined

John Kasich claimed, regarding the size of the U.S. economy, that "We're bigger than the next two economies--China and Japan-combined," (p. 236 of his book, "Two Paths"). Is that true?

Quick answer: Yes.

Bottom line: Kasich's claim is accurate for when he wrote the book, and will certainly be accurate during the upcoming 2020 election, and likely for the 2024 election too.
Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues Fact-Check on Two Paths, by John Kasich, p.236

Elizabeth Warren on China: (Technology Apr 18, 2017)
China spends 8.6% of GDP on infrastructure; we spend 2.5%

China is spending 8.6%of its GDP on infrastructure. Why? Because the Chinese are working hard to build a country for the global economy. And here in the US? Our infrastructure spending is stuck at 2.5% of the GDP--and it has been for years. By that measurement, America now lags behind India, most of Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. In fact, the only region of the world spending less on infrastructure than the US is South America, which comes in at about 2.4%.

America ramped up its infrastructure long before many other parts of the world, but our refusal to maintain & upgrade it is catching up with us. The overall quality of infrastructure in the US is now rated just slightly ahead of Taiwan's and far behind the quality of that in Germany & Japan.

This failure to invest in our future is incredibly shortsighted. This plan isn't pro-business. This plan is pro-stupid. More investment in basic infrastructure would transform our daily living, along with our long-term prospects.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: This Fight is Our Fight, by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, p.130-1

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Apr 13, 2017)
NATO: apply new solutions to face new circumstances

Trump's about-face in supporting NATO was only part of a day of flip flops: the president determined that China is not a currency manipulator after all, and embraced the Ex-Im Bank that he once called unnecessary. Most striking, he pivoted on Russia, lashing it for supporting rogue nations after years of praising Pres. Vladimir Putin.

The Russia reversal and the NATO turnabout were inherently linked, of course. As Russia appears more ominous, NATO seems more necessary. But the shift in attitude also offered one of the starkest examples yet of Trump's evolving views: "We must not be trapped by the tired thinking that so many have, but apply new solutions to face new circumstances throughout the world," Trump said at his news conference with the NATO secretary general.

Trump's campaign criticism of NATO stunned many at home and abroad, especially when he suggested conditioning America's commitment to defend its treaty allies on whether they had met their financial obligations.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: New York Times on Trump Administration promises

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Apr 12, 2017)
China is no longer a currency manipulator

President Donald Trump said that his administration will not label China a currency manipulator, backing away from a campaign promise, even as he said the U.S. dollar was "getting too strong" and would eventually hurt the economy.

A U.S. Treasury spokesman confirmed that the Treasury Department's semi-annual report on currency practices of major trading partners, due out later this week, will not name China a currency manipulator. "They're not currency manipulators," Trump said about China. The statement is an about-face from Trump's election campaign promises to slap that label on Beijing on the first day of his administration as part of his plan to reduce Chinese imports into the United States.

The Wall Street Journal paraphrased Trump as saying that the reason he changed his mind on the currency issue was because China has not been manipulating its yuan for months and because taking the step now could jeopardize his talks with Beijing on confronting the threat from North Korea.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Reuters reporting on 2020 hopefuls

Cory Booker on China: (Free Trade Apr 1, 2017)
Deal with China despite their cheating

BROKEN PROMISE: : Booker said on his Senate campaign website, "China's cheating--through artificially depressing its currency and other unfair trade practices--is so damaging to American workers." But in the Senate, Booker called on Vice President Joe Biden to help settle a trade dispute between the U.S. and China over solar equipment, rather than continue anti-dumping investigations and tariffs. Booker talked tough on China during the campaign, but caved in when it came to actually negotiating a deal. We label this an "evolution" where Booker accepted that dealing with China gave more leverage than pressuring China from a stand-off position.

ANALYSIS: Comparing the two contrasting statements, Booker is in effect saying "China cheats--but let's deal with them anyway." Booker's campaign statements support "fair trade" - rewriting the rules--whereas his actions support "free trade"--making SOME sort of deal despite whatever problems come up.

Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: Cory Booker 'Promises Broken,' by Jesse Gordon, p.129

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Feb 28, 2017)
Restart engine after worst financial recovery in 65 years

We must honestly acknowledge the circumstances we inherited: 94 million Americans are out of the labor force. Over 43 million people are now living in poverty. More than 1 in 5 people in their prime working years are not working. We have the worst financial recovery in 65 years.

We've lost more than 1/4 of our manufacturing jobs since NAFTA was approved, and we've lost 60,000 factories since China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001. Our trade deficit in goods with the world last year was nearly $800 billion dollars.

To accomplish our goals at home and abroad, we must restart the engine of the American economy--making it easier for companies to do business in the United States, and much harder for companies to leave.

Right now, American companies are taxed at one of the highest rates anywhere in the world. My economic team is developing historic tax reform that will reduce the tax rate on our companies so they can compete and thrive anywhere and with anyone.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2017 State of the Union address to Congress

Susan Rice on China: (Free Trade Jan 18, 2017)
China is US's most consequential international relationship

Rice said China is our country's most consequential international relationship, one that has been threatened by President-elect Donald Trump saying he would reconsider the One China policy. "To abrogate the One China policy, or to bring it into an ancillary negotiation on an economic or trade issue would be a grave mistake. We manage our differences and our competition in a constructive fashion to avoid conflict," Rice added. "But that whole balance could be upset in a very devastating way."
Click for Susan Rice on other issues.   Source: CBS News on Obama Cabinet

Susan Rice on China: (Free Trade Jan 18, 2017)
US beneficiary of free trade; don't cede leadership to China

The United States has been the biggest beneficiary of globalization, and free trade, and open markets. It has reinforced democratic rule in many places. It's raised living standards, and the exports are a huge basis of our economy. We would be very remiss if we ceded the mantle of leadership on free trade and economic openness to China.
Click for Susan Rice on other issues.   Source: CBS News on 2020 Maine Senate race

Bernie Sanders on China: (Jobs Nov 15, 2016)
Establish worker-owned cooperatives to counter corporations

We must develop new economic models to create jobs and increase wages and productivity. Instead of giving huge tax breaks to corporations that ship our jobs to China, we need to provide assistance to workers who want to purchase their own businesses by establishing worker-owned cooperatives and majority owned employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs). Study after study has shown that employee ownership increases employment, increases productivity, increase sales, and increases wages in the United States.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Our Revolution, by Bernie Sanders, p. 260

Hillary Clinton on China: (Free Trade Oct 19, 2016)
I fought illegal dumping of Chinese steel and aluminum

TRUMP: Our country is stagnant. We've lost our jobs. We're not making things anymore. Our product is pouring in from China, pouring in from Vietnam, pouring in from all over the world. She wants to sign Trans-Pacific Partnership.

CLINTON: When I saw the final agreement for TPP, it didn't meet my test: Does it create jobs, raise incomes, and further our national security? I'm against it now. There's only one of us on this stage who's actually shipped jobs to Mexico: that's Donald. He's shipped jobs to 12 countries. But he mentioned China: one of the biggest problems we have with China is the illegal dumping of steel and aluminum into our markets. I have fought against that as a senator. I've stood up against it as secretary of state. Donald has bought Chinese steel and aluminum. In fact, the Trump Hotel right here in Las Vegas was made with Chinese steel. So he goes around with crocodile tears about how terrible it is, but he has given jobs to Chinese steelworkers, not American steelworkers.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Third 2016 Presidential Debate, moderated by Chris Wallace

Hillary Clinton on China: (Free Trade Oct 9, 2016)
Trade prosecutor to deal with China illegally dumping steel

Q: How will your energy policy meet our energy needs, while at the same time remaining environmentally friendly and minimizing job loss?

TRUMP: Energy is under siege by the Obama administration. The EPA, Environmental Protection Agency, is killing these energy companies. And you take a look at what's happening to steel and the cost of steel and China dumping vast amounts of steel all over the United States, which essentially is killing our steelworkers and our steel companies. It's an absolute disgrace.

CLINTON: First of all, China is illegally dumping steel in the United States and Donald Trump is buying it to build his buildings, putting steelworkers and American steel plants out of business. That's something that I fought against as a senator and that I would have a trade prosecutor to make sure that we don't get taken advantage of by China on steel or anything else.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Second 2016 Presidential Debate at WUSTL in St. Louis MO

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Oct 9, 2016)
China is dumping steel all over & killing steel companies

Q: How will your energy policy meet our energy needs, while at the same time remaining environmentally friendly and minimizing job loss?

TRUMP: Energy is under siege by the Obama administration. The EPA, Environmental Protection Agency, is killing these energy companies. And you take a look at what's happening to steel and the cost of steel and China dumping vast amounts of steel all over the United States, which essentially is killing our steelworkers and our steel companies. It's an absolute disgrace.

CLINTON: First of all, China is illegally dumping steel in the United States and Donald Trump is buying it to build his buildings, putting steelworkers and American steel plants out of business. That's something that I fought against as a senator and that I would have a trade prosecutor to make sure that we don't get taken advantage of by China on steel or anything else.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Second 2016 Presidential Debate at WUSTL in St. Louis MO

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Oct 9, 2016)
FactCheck: Yes, has opposed trade deals since Reagan

When accused of opposing Reagan's economic policy in 1987, Trump asserted that "I did disagree with Ronald Reagan very strongly on trade." Is it true that Trump opposed US trade deals in the past?

Yes, for as far back as we have records: in his 2015 book, in his 2011 book, and in his 2000 book. Some sample excerpts:

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues Fact-Checking on 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Sep 26, 2016)
Our jobs are fleeing to Mexico; China uses us as piggy bank

Our jobs are fleeing the country. They're going to Mexico. They're going to many other countries. You look at what China is doing to our country in terms of making our product. They're devaluing their currency, and there's nobody in our government to fight them. And we have a very good fight. And we have a winning fight. Because they're using our country as a piggy bank to rebuild China, and many other countries are doing the same thing. So we're losing our good jobs, so many of them. When you look at what's happening in Mexico, a friend of mine who builds plants said it's the eighth wonder of the world. They're building some of the biggest plants anywhere in the world, some of the most sophisticated, some of the best plants. With the US, as he said, not so much. So Ford is leaving. You see that, their small car division leaving. Thousands of jobs leaving Michigan, leaving Ohio. They're all leaving. And we can't allow it to happen anymore. [See OnTheIssues Fact-Check!]
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

Donald Trump on China: (Technology Sep 26, 2016)
We invented Internet but ISIS is beating us at our own game

Q: How do we fight a cyber attack?

A: We should be better than anybody else, and perhaps we're not. I don't think anybody knows it was Russia that broke into the DNC. She's saying "Russia, Russia, Russia," but I don't. Maybe it was. I mean, it could be Russia, but it could also be China. It could also be lots of other people. It also could be somebody sitting on their bed that weighs 400 pounds, OK? We came up with the Internet, and Clinton and myself would agree very much, when you look at what ISIS is doing with the Internet, they're beating us at our own game. So we have to get very, very tough on cyber and cyber warfare. It is a huge problem. The security aspect of cyber is very, very tough. And maybe it's hardly doable. But I will say, we are not doing the job we should be doing. But that's true throughout our whole governmental society. We have so many things that we have to do better and certainly cyber is one of them.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

John Kasich on China: (Free Trade Sep 16, 2016)
TPP takes advantage of economic opportunities in Pacific Rim

Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton oppose the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership, which Obama has pitched as a way to counterbalance China's rise in the region. "This is an opportunity for the Congress to carry out its responsibility," Kasich said. "You gotta get this done."

Kasich waded into the presidential debate a bit, but mainly focused his efforts on rallying Republicans away from Trump's protectionist stance and toward the party's pro-trade orthodoxy. "I think I need to spend my time making the case that we don't want to hurt US national security issue, we don't want to turn our back over there, and frankly, we don't want to put ourselves in a position where we're not taking advantage of economic opportunities," he said.

Kasich also defended the prospect of Obama pushing the TPP toward passage in a "lame duck" session of Congress, after the November 8 election but before a new president and Congress are sworn in.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: CNN's E.Bradner & E.Scott on 2016 presidential hopefuls

John Kasich on China: (Free Trade Sep 16, 2016)
Supports Trans-Pacific Partnership but not trade ideology

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says he feels it's his "responsibility and duty as a leader"--no matter the political cost--to help President Barack Obama shepherd the Trans-Pacific Partnership through Congress. "I have never been an ideological supporter of free trade. The ideologues use to come to me and be frustrated with me," he said. "But when you look at these agreements in a real sense--this one is much different than even NAFTA," Kasich added. "This is China. This is Russia. These are fledgling countries in Asia and we want to pivot to Asia? We have to do this."

He said he doesn't mind the political backlash he could face. "I welcome the fact that people will criticize me for putting my country ahead of my party," Kasich said. Kasich and Obama could be facing an uphill battle: Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton oppose the 12-nation Pacific Rim deal, which Obama has pitched as a way to counterbalance China's rise in the region.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: CNN's E.Bradner & E.Scott on 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Sep 7, 2016)
Russia wants to defeat ISIS as badly as we do; work together

Q: What prepares you to make the decisions that a commander-in-chief has to make?

A: I've built a great company. I've been all over the world. I've dealt with foreign countries. I've done tremendously well dealing with China and with many of the countries that are just ripping this country. I think the main thing is I have great judgment.

Q: What steps would you take to bring Putin back to negotiating table?

A: I would have a good relationship with Putin. Take a look at what happened with their fighter jets circling one of our aircraft in a very dangerous manner. Somebody said less than 10 feet away. This is hostility. Russia wants to defeat ISIS as badly as we do. If we had a relationship with Russia, wouldn't it be wonderful if we could knock the hell out of ISIS?

Q: Putin called you a brilliant leader.

A: When he calls me brilliant, I'll take the compliment. The fact is, look, it's not going to get him anywhere. I'm a negotiator. We're going to take back our country.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 NBC Commander-in-Chief forum with Matt Lauer

Mike Pence on China: (Free Trade Jul 14, 2016)
Supports TPP and trade agreements with Pacific Rim and China

Before he became Trump's vice-presidential nominee, Mike Pence supported every free-trade agreement that came before him. That record puts him squarely at odds with Trump on one of the signature issues of the businessman's presidential campaign. Pence wrote, "Reducing tariffs and other trade barriers is something that Congress must do. I encourage your support for any trade-related measures when they are brought before the Congress."
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Washington Post, "Huge supporter," on 2016 Veepstakes

Bill Weld on China: (Homeland Security Jun 22, 2016)
Nuclear proliferation is #1 threat to world security

[Trump's hard line on immigration] is not the limit of the really unreasonable foreign policy proposals by the presumptive Republican nominee. The notion of having Japan and South Korea have access to nuclear weapons is crazy in a world where nuclear proliferation is the number-one threat to the security of the world. The notion that he is going to impose huge penalties on Mexico and China at will violates our obligations under treaties and international agreements like the World Trade Organization.
Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: CNN Libertarian Town Hall: joint interview of Johnson & Weld

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Mar 10, 2016)
It's not free trade with China; it's stupid trade

Sen. Ted CRUZ: Donald is right about international trade. He's right about the problems. But his solutions don't work: he proposed a 45% tariff on foreign goods. The effect of a 45% tariff would be when you go to Walmart, the prices you pay go up 45%. A tariff is a tax on you, the American people.

TRUMP: The 45% tariff is a threat. It's not a tax, it was a threat. It will be a tax if they don't behave. Take China as an example. I have many friends, great manufacturers, they want to go into China. They can't. China won't let them. We talk about free trade. It's not tree free trade; it's stupid trade. China dumps everything that they have over here. No tax, no anything. We can't get into China. The best manufacturers, when they get in, they have to pay a tremendous tax. The 45% is a threat that if they don't behave, we will tax you. It doesn't have to be 45, it could be less. But it has to be something because our country & our trade & our deals and most importantly our jobs are going to hell.??

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 GOP primary debate in Miami

Ted Cruz on China: (Free Trade Mar 10, 2016)
Import taxes are paid by consumers, not by China

CRUZ: Donald is right about the problems of international trade. But his solutions don't work: he proposed a 45% tariff on foreign goods. The effect of a 45% tariff would be when you go to Walmart, the prices you pay go up 45%. A tariff is a tax on you.

Donald TRUMP: The 45% tariff is a threat. It will be a tax if they don't behave. China dumps everything that they have over here. We can't get into China. The 45% is a threat that if they don't behave, we will tax you.

CRUZ: It's not China that pays the tax. It's you, the working men and women. So ask yourself at home: How is this helping you? If your wages have been stagnant for 20 years; if you can't pay the bills, how does it help you to have a president come and say, "I'm going to put a 45% tax on diapers, on automobiles, on clothing." That hurts you. It's why we've got to get beyond rhetoric of "China bad," and actually get to "how do you solve the problem?" Because this solution would hurt jobs and hurt hard-working taxpayers in America.

Click for Ted Cruz on other issues.   Source: 2016 GOP primary debate in Miami

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Mar 3, 2016)
I've been moving clothing-making from China to U.S.

Sen. Marco RUBIO: Trump can start tonight by announcing that all the Donald Trump clothing will no longer be made in China and in Mexico, but will be made here in the United States.

Q: Will you promise that you will move your clothing collection to the US, the clothes that are made in China and Mexico?

TRUMP: I will do that. And by the way, I have been doing it more and more. But they devalue their currencies, in particular China. Mexico is doing a big number now, also. Japan is unbelievable what they're doing. They devalue their currencies, and they make it impossible for clothing-makers in this country to do clothing in this country. The Trans-Pacific Partnership--which Marco is in favor of---they don't take into concurrence the devaluation. They're devaluing their currency.

RUBIO: The answer is, he's not going to do it. And you know why? The reason why he makes it in China or Mexico is because he can make more money on it.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 Fox News GOP debate in Detroit Michigan

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Feb 25, 2016)
With a $58 billion trade deficit, Mexico will pay for wall

RUBIO: About the trade war -- I don't understand, because your ties and the clothes are made in Mexico and in China. You're going to start a trade war against your own ties and suits. Why don't you make them in America?

TRUMP: We have a trade deficit with Mexico of $58 billion a year. We're going to make them pay for that wall. The wall is $10 billion to $12 billion. I don't mind trade wars when we're losing $58 billion a year. Mexico is taking our businesses. They de-value their currencies to such an extent that our businesses cannot compete with them, our workers lose their jobs. You wouldn't know anything about it because you're a lousy businessman.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary

Donald Trump on China: (Jobs Feb 13, 2016)
Bring jobs back from China, Mexico, Japan, and Vietnam

I'm going to bring jobs back from China, Mexico Japan, Vietnam. They are taking our jobs. They are taking our wealth. We have $2.5 trillion offshore. We're going to bring that money back. You take a look at what happened just this week, China bought the Chicago Stock Exchange. Nabisco and Ford, they're all moving out. We have an economy that last quarter didn't grow. We have to make our economy grow again.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 CBS Republican primary debate in South Carolina

Bernie Sanders on China: (Crime Feb 11, 2016)
By 2020, I pledge to have fewer people in jail than China

Where we are failing is in the very high rate of recidivism we see. People are being released from jail without the education, without the job training, without the resources they need to get their lives together, then they end up back in jail. When we have more people in jail, disproportionately African American and Latino, than China does, a communist authoritarian society four times our size. At the end of my first term as president we will not have more people in jail than any other country
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 PBS Democratic debate in Wisconsin

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 10, 2016)
China should make Kim Jong Un disappear

Trump was asked how he would respond to North Korea's nuclear threat. "I would get China to make that guy disappear in one form or another very quickly," Trump said. He didn't clarify whether disappearing was equivalent to being assassinated but said, "Well, I've heard of worse things, frankly."

"I mean, this guy's a bad dude, and don't underestimate him," Trump said, referring to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "Any young guy who can take over from his father with all those generals and everybody else that probably want the position, this is not somebody to be underestimated."

Trump maintained that China has control over North Korea and the US has control over China--thus "China should do that," he said. "China has control--absolute control--over North Korea. They don't say it, but they do," Trump explained. "And they should make that problem disappear. China is sucking us dry. They're taking our money. They're taking our jobs. We have rebuilt China with what they've taken out."

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Nolan McCaskill on Politico.com on Foreign Influences

Hillary Clinton on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 4, 2016)
Obama trusted my judgment; I'll be ready on Day One

Having run a hard race against Senator Obama, he turned to me to be secretary of State. And when it comes to the biggest counterterrorism issues that we faced in this administration, namely whether or not to go after bin Laden, I was at that table, I was exercising my judgment to advise the president on what to do, on Iran, on Russia on China, on a whole raft of issues. You've got to be ready on day one.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Bernie Sanders on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 4, 2016)
North Korea is run by nuclear-armed paranoid dictator

North Korea is an isolated country run by a handful of dictators, or maybe just one, who seems to be somewhat paranoid. And, who had nuclear weapons. Our goal there is to work and lean strongly on China to put pressure. China is one of the few major countries in the world that has significant support for North Korea, and we got to do everything we can to put pressure on China. I worry about an isolated, paranoid country with atomic bombs.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Bernie Sanders on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 4, 2016)
I worry about Putin in Crimea but worry more about N. Korea

Q: Secretary of Defence Ash Carter said Russia is the most important national security threat. Do you agree?

SANDERS: No I don't. I worry about Putin and his military adventurism in the Crimea, but I worry more about an isolated country. Russia lives in the world. China lives in the world. North Korea is a strange country because it is so isolated, and I do feel that a nation with nuclear weapons, they have got to be dealt with.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Feb 4, 2016)
I will take on corporations that take their jobs to China

There are many corporations who have turned their backs on the American worker, who have said, if I can make another nickel in profit by going to China and shutting down in the United States of America, that's what I will do. I will do my best to transform our trade policy and take on these corporations who want to invest in low-income countries around the world rather than in the United States of America.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Barack Obama on China: (Free Trade Jan 20, 2016)
TPP facilitates US control over Asian market

We forged a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, and protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia. It cuts 18,000 taxes on products made in America, which will then support more good jobs here in America. With TPP, China does not set the rules in that region; we do. You want to show our strength in this new century? Approve this agreement. Give us the tools to enforce it. It's the right thing to do.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2016 State of the Union address to Congress

Bernie Sanders on China: (Drugs Jan 17, 2016)
Why police records for marijuana but not white collar crime?

CLINTON: One out of three African American men may well end up going to prison.

SANDERS: Let me respond to what the secretary said. We have a criminal justice system which is broken. Who in America is satisfied that we have more people in jail than any other country on Earth, including China? Disproportionately African American, and Latino. Who is satisfied that 51% of African American young people are either unemployed, or underemployed? Who is satisfied that millions of people have police records for possessing marijuana when the CEO's of Wall Street companies who destroyed our economy have no police records. We need to take a very hard look at our criminal justice system, investing in jobs and education, not in jails and incarceration.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 NBC Democratic presidential primary debate

Donald Trump on China: (Foreign Policy Jan 14, 2016)
China totally controls North Korea; they're just taunting us

Without China, North Korea doesn't even eat. China is ripping us on trade. They're devaluing their currency and they're killing our companies. We've lost between four and seven million jobs because of China. What I said then was, "we have very unfair trade with China. We're going to have a trade deficit of 505 billion dollars this year with China. I would start taxing goods that come in from China.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox Business Republican 2-tier debate

Barack Obama on China: (Homeland Security Jan 13, 2016)
We spend more on military than next 8 nations combined

President Obama said, "We spend more on our military than the next eight nations combined." Is that literally true? We found the answer on Wikipedia, for the top 9 countries in military expenditures (in billions per year):
  1. $581B United States
  2. $129B China
  3. $81B Saudi Arabia
  4. $70B Russia
  5. $62B United Kingdom
  6. $53B France
  7. $48B Japan
  8. $45B India
  9. $44B Germany

The "next eight nations combined" add up to $532 billion annual military expenditures. Compare that to the U.S.'s annual total of $581 billion, and Pres. Obama is accurate. (Sen. Rand Paul said in 2015 the same statement about "the next ten countries combined," and we rated his statement "loosely accurate", but Obama could have gone up to "the next nine nations combined" adding in South Korea's $34B). Obama's point was the same as Paul's: the U.S. has by far the strongest military on earth, and we need not increase military spending to maintain our military dominance.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2016 State of the Union: OnTheIssues FactCheck

Barack Obama on China: (Free Trade Jan 12, 2016)
TPP cuts 18,000 taxes on products made in America

We forged the Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, and protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia. It cuts 18,000 taxes on products made in America which will then support more good jobs here in America. With TPP, China does not set the rules in that region; we do. We want to show our strength in this new century? Approve this agreement, give us the tools to enforce it. It's the right thing to do.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2016 State of the Union address

Bernie Sanders on China: (Foreign Policy Jan 7, 2016)
Lean on China to deal with North Korea

Q: North Korea claims to have exploded another nuclear bomb, perhaps a hydrogen bomb. If you were in the Oval Office, what would you do about it?

SANDERS: First of all, we're going to have to lean on China. China is North Korea's closest ally. They're gonna have to push North Korea to start adhering to international agreements.

Q: How do we lean on China?

SANDERS: We have a relationship with China. China is equally concerned about what North Korea is doing. North Korea is a paranoid, isolated nation. When you have a hydrogen bomb, if that's true, you're a threat to China as well.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos

Hillary Clinton on China: (Principles & Values Dec 19, 2015)
Turn to Bill for special missions, not White House china

The role has been defined by each person who's held it. Mrs. Obama has been a terrific leader when it comes to young people's health. With respect to my husband, I am probably going to pick the flowers and the china for state dinners. But I will turn to him as prior presidents have for special missions, for advice, and in particular, how we're going to get the economy working again for everybody, which he knows a little bit about.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2015 ABC/WMUR Democratic primary debate in N.H.

Donald Trump on China: (Technology Dec 15, 2015)
Close our Internet up, to fight ISIS terrorist recruitment

Q: You recently suggested "closing that Internet up," as a way to stop ISIS from recruiting online. Some say that would put the US in line with China and North Korea.

TRUMP: ISIS is recruiting through the Internet. ISIS is using the Internet better than we are using the Internet, and it was our idea. I want to get our brilliant people from Silicon Valley and other places and figure out a way that ISIS cannot do what they're doing. You talk freedom of speech. I don't want them using our Internet to take our young, impressionable youth. We should be using our most brilliant minds to figure a way that ISIS cannot use the Internet. And then we should be able to penetrate the Internet and find out exactly where ISIS is and everything about ISIS. And we can do that if we use our good people.

Q: So, are you open to closing parts of the Internet?

TRUMP: I would certainly be open to closing areas where we are at war with somebody. I don't want to let people that want to kill us \use our Internet.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2015 CNN/Salem Republican two-tier debate

John Kasich on China: (Technology Nov 17, 2015)
Broadcast Judeo-Christian values abroad, to help defeat ISIS

As part of a broad national security plan to defeat ISIS, Republican Presidential candidate John Kasich proposed creating a new government agency to push Judeo-Christian values around the world. The new agency, which he hasn't yet named, would promote a Jewish- and Christian-based belief system to four regions of the world: China, Iran, Russia and the Middle East.

"We need to beam messages around the world" about the freedoms Americans enjoy, Kasich said. "It means freedom, it means opportunity, it means respect for women, it means freedom to gather, it means so many things."

The US already has a government-funded broadcast system in Voice of America, which broadcasts American news and programming abroad. The radio, television and digital audience reaches up to 188 million people per week.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential hopefuls on Syrian Refugees by NBC News

John Kasich on China: (Foreign Policy Nov 10, 2015)
China doesn't own the South China Sea; show US Navy there

Q: What about China claiming artificial islands in the South China Sea, and Obama's response?

KASICH: China doesn't own the South China Sea, and I give the president some credit for being able to move a naval force in there to let the Chinese know that we're not going to put up with it any more.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Fox Business/WSJ Second Tier debate

John Kasich on China: (Free Trade Nov 10, 2015)
TPP is a strategic alliance against China

Q: What about the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

KASICH: TPP, it's critical to us, not only for economic reasons and for jobs, because there are so many people who are connected to getting jobs because of trade, but it allows us to create not only economy alliances, but also potentially strategic alliances against the Chinese. They are not our enemy, but they are certainly not our friend.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Fox Business/WSJ Second Tier debate

Rand Paul on China: (Free Trade Nov 10, 2015)
Senate should be involved in trade deals, not just President

Q [to Donald Trump]: You've criticized the TPP, the Trans-Pacific Partnership with 11 Asian countries?

TRUMP: The TPP is horrible deal. It's a deal that was designed for China to come in through the back door. We're losing now over $500 billion in terms of imbalance with China. If you look at the way China in particular takes advantage of the US--it's through currency manipulation. It's not even discussed in the TPP.

PAUL: Hey, you know, we might want to point out China is not part of this deal.

Q: But isn't that part of the problem? That if this deal is not ratified by the Senate, then it would actually give China an opportunity to grow its economic leadership?

PAUL: There is an argument that China doesn't like the deal, because in us doing the deal, we'll be trading with their competitors. But we've missed the point a little bit. It's a mistake that we give up power to the presidency on these trade deals. We give up the power to filibuster, and I'm kind of fond of that power.

Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: Fox Business/WSJ First Tier debate

Rand Paul on China: (Homeland Security Nov 10, 2015)
FactCheck: Yes, military spending as much as next 10 nations

Senator Rand Paul said, "We need a safe country, but, you know, we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. I want a strong national defense, but I don't want us to be bankrupt." Is that literally true? We found the answer on Wikipedia, for the top 11 countries in military expenditures (in billions per year):
  1. $581B United States
  2. $129B China
  3. $81B Saudi Arabia
  4. $70B Russia
  5. $62B United Kingdom
  6. $53B France
  7. $48B Japan
  8. $45B India
  9. $44B Germany
  10. $34B South Korea
  11. $32B Brazil

The "next ten countries combined" add up to $598 billion annual military expenditures. Compare that to the U.S.'s annual total of $581 billion, and Sen. Paul is pretty much correct. He spoke a bit loosely, saying "we spend MORE than the next ten countries combined," when he should have said "we spend A COMPARABLE AMOUNT to the next ten countries combined." But we rate his statement as ACCURATE.

Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues FactCheck on Fox Business/WSJ debate

Ted Cruz on China: (Immigration Nov 10, 2015)
Illegals are an economic calamity for low-wage Americans

For those who believe people 'ought to come to this country legally, we're tired of being told it's anti-immigrant. I am the son of an immigrant who came legally from Cuba. We can embrace legal immigration while believing in the rule of law. Try going illegally to another country. Try going to China, or Japan. Try going to Mexico. See what they do. Every sovereign nation secures its borders, and it is not compassionate to say we're not going to enforce the laws.
Click for Ted Cruz on other issues.   Source: Fox Business/WSJ Second Tier debate

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Nov 8, 2015)
Keep mortgage interest deduction; knock out carried interest

Q: What tax loopholes would you close?

TRUMP: I'm going to be bringing back jobs from China, from Japan, from India, from Brazil. This is going on at a level that you have never seen before. We now have corporate inversions, where companies are moving out of the United States. And they will be moving out in big numbers if we don't do something quickly. And my plan stops all of that.

Q: So, you want to close the loopholes for tax havens?

TRUMP: And I want to bring back trillions of dollars that is stuck in other countries that we won't let back in because we don't have intelligent people running our country.

Q: What about other loopholes on the personal side? Mortgage interest stays in there? Charitable giving?

TRUMP: That's right. Mortgage interest deduction would stay, absolutely. Carried interest, though, would not stay. One of the ways that the hedge fund guys who make a lot of money pay very little tax, the carried interest deduction. I'm knocking that out.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2015 interview by Bob Schieffer

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Nov 3, 2015)
Chinese are savvy businesspeople: our enemy who need us

There are people who wish I wouldn't refer to China as our enemy. But that's exactly what they are. They have destroyed entire industries by utilizing low-wage workers, cost us tens of thousands of jobs, spied on our businesses, stolen our technology, and have manipulated and devalued their currency, which makes importing our goods more expensive--and sometimes, impossible.

I know from my own experience that this is a difficult problem. The Chinese are very savvy businesspeople, and they have great advantages over our manufacturers. I've had several Trump-brand products made there.

Remember: The Chinese need us as much as we need them. Maybe even more.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Crippled America, by Donald Trump, p. 43-5

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Oct 28, 2015)
Make economy dynamic; bring back jobs from China & Mexico

We're going to make a dynamic economy from what we have right now. We're going to bring jobs back from Japan, we're going to bring jobs back from China, we're going to bring, frankly, jobs back from Mexico where, as you probably saw, Nabisco is leaving Chicago with one of their biggest plants, and they're moving it to Mexico. We're going to bring jobs and manufacturing back. We're going to cut costs. We're going to save Social Security, and we're going to save Medicare.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: GOP "Your Money/Your Vote" 2015 CNBC 1st-tier debate

Donald Trump on China: (Immigration Oct 28, 2015)
I can get Mexico to pay for border wall; politicians can't

Q: You're promising to build a wall and make another country pay for it?

TRUMP: Right. We're going to build the wall; we're going to create a border. We're going to let people in, but they're going to come in legally. They are going to come in legally. And it's something that can be done. They built The Great Wall of China. That's 13,000 miles. Here, we actually need 1,000, because we have natural barriers. We can do a wall. We're going to have a big, fat beautiful door right in the middle of the wall. We are going to have people come in, but they are coming in legally. And Mexico is going to pay for the wall, because Mexico--I love the Mexican people, I respect the Mexican leaders, but the leaders are much sharper, smarter and more cunning than our leaders. And people say, "Oh, how are you going to get Mexico to pay?" A politician cannot get them to pay. I can.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: GOP `Your Money/Your Vote` 2015 CNBC 1st-tier debate

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Oct 18, 2015)
Restrict free trade to keep jobs in US

Q: You would end NAFTA, kill the Pacific Trade Agreement, impose tariffs on some products like 35% on Ford cars made in Mexico.

TRUMP: I am all for free trade, but it's got to be fair. When Ford moves their massive plants to Mexico, we get nothing. I want them to stay in Michigan.

Q: But the American Enterprise Institute says, your Trump Collection clothing line, some of it is made in Mexico and China.

TRUMP: That's true. I want it to be made here.

Q: The point is you're doing just what Ford is--you're taking advantage of a global trading market.

TRUMP: I never dispute that. I just ordered 4,000 television sets from South Korea. I don't want to order them from South Korea. I don't think anybody makes television sets in the United States anymore. I talk about it all the time. We don't make anything anymore. Now you look at Boeing. Boeing's going over to China. They're going to build a massive plant because China's demanding it in order to order airplanes from Boeing.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday 2015 Coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Hillary Clinton on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 13, 2015)
Obama & I crashed China meeting and got climate change deal

Q: What will you do about climate change?

CLINTON: I have been on the forefront of dealing with climate change, starting in 2009, when President Obama and I crashed a meeting with the Chinese and got them to sign up to the first international agreement to combat climate change that they'd ever joined.

Q: Are you referring to the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen?

CLINTON: When we met in Copenhagen in 2009 and, literally, President Obama and I were hunting for the Chinese, going throughout this huge convention center, because we knew we had to get them to agree to something. Because there will be no effective efforts against climate change unless China and India join with the rest of the world. They told us they'd left for the airport; we found out they were having a secret meeting. We marched up, we broke in, we said, "Let's sit down and talk about what we need to do." And we did come up with the first international agreement that China has signed.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2015 CNN Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas

Hillary Clinton on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 13, 2015)
Chinese participation is essential to climate change

When we met in Copenhagen in 2009 and President Obama and I were hunting for the Chinese, going throughout this huge convention center, because we knew we had to get them to agree to something. Because there will be no effective efforts against climate change unless China and India join with the rest of the world. There will be an international meeting at the end of this year, and we must get verifiable commitments to fight climate change from every country gathered there.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2015 CNN Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Oct 11, 2015)
Does not support ANY free trade agreements

Q: What do you think about the new TPP trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

SANDERS: I voted against NAFTA, CAFTA, PNTR with China. I think they have been a disaster for the American worker. A lot of corporations that shut down here move abroad. Working people understand that after NAFTA, CAFTA, PNTR with China we have lost millions of decent paying jobs. Since 2001, 60,000 factories in America have been shut down. We're in a race to the bottom, where our wages are going down. Is all of that attributable to trade? No. Is a lot of it? Yes. TPP was written by corporate America and the pharmaceutical industry and Wall Street. That's what this trade agreement is about. I do not want American workers to competing against people in Vietnam who make 56 cents an hour for a minimum wage.

Q: So basically, there's never been a single trade agreement this country's negotiated that you've been comfortable with?

SANDERS: That's correct.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press 2015 interview moderated by Chuck Todd

Donald Trump on China: (Budget & Economy Oct 4, 2015)
Grow the economy at 6% annually by ending inversions

TRUMP: Under my plan we're going to grow the economy. If China does a 7%, they're having a terrible year. We're saying we can't do a 3% and 4%.

Q: But we just had 4% the last quarter.

TRUMP: But if you look at the overall average, we're doing less than 2% for the year. If China can do 7% -

Q: Right, but an emerging economy is always going to do 6%, 7%. Our sweet spot is 3% to 5%.

TRUMP: Right. If we do 6% or 7% under my plan, everybody benefits in jobs.

Q: We've never had a year of 6% or 7%. How is that gonna look?

TRUMP: Well, number one, corporate inversion is a big deal. There are many companies right now that are talking about very seriously leaving this country. And you're talking about thousands of jobs.

Q: What you're saying is, you make it all up with growth.

TRUMP: Not all up with growth. We also start cutting.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press 2015 interview moderated by Chuck Todd

Bernie Sanders on China: (Foreign Policy Sep 5, 2015)
Promote democracy in China, but not at expense of US workers

Q: What about a China trade deal?

A: I want to see the people in China live in a democratic society with a higher standard of living. I want to see that, but I don't think that has to take place at the expense of the American worker. I don't think decent-paying jobs in this country have got to be lost as companies shut down here and move to China. I want to see the Chinese people do well, but I do not want to see the collapse of the American middle class take place, and I will fight against that.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 grassroots campaign website FeelTheBern.org, "Issues"

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Sep 5, 2015)
China trade has led to loss of 3M American jobs so far

Q: What does Bernie's track record look like with regard to Chinese trade policy?

A: Time and time again, Bernie has voted against free trade deals with China. In 1999, Bernie voted in the House against granting China "Most Favored Nation" status. In 2000, Bernie voted against Permanent Normal Trade Relations with China which aimed to create jobs, but instead lead to the loss of more than 3 million jobs for Americans.

Q: Maybe these trade agreements aren't all great for Americans, but don't they provide millions of jobs for Chinese workers?

A: Bernie firmly rejects the idea that America's standard of living must drop in order to see a raise in the standard of living in China.

Q: So what does Bernie propose we do?

A: Instead of passing such trade deals again and again, Bernie argues we must "develop trade policies which demand that American corporations create jobs here, and not abroad."

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 grassroots campaign website FeelTheBern.org, "Issues"

Rand Paul on China: (Budget & Economy Aug 6, 2015)
Borrowing a million a minute has gotta stop somewhere

I'm the only one on the stage who actually has a five-year budget that balances. I've put pencil to paper and I've said I would cut spending, and I've said exactly where. Each one of my budgets has taken a meat axe to foreign aid. We shouldn't borrow money from China to send it anywhere. Out of your surplus, you can help your allies, but we cannot give away money we don't have. We do not project power from bankruptcy court. We're borrowing a million dollars a minute. It's got to stop somewhere.
Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: Fox News/Facebook Top Ten First Tier debate transcript

Ted Cruz on China: (Technology Aug 6, 2015)
Of course China & Russia have conducted cyberwarfare on US

Q: In your view, have Russia and China committed cyber war, and if you were president, what would you do about it?

CRUZ: Well, of course they have, and over the last six and a half years we've seen the consequences of the Obama-Clinton foreign policy. Leading from behind is a disaster. We have abandoned and alienated our friends and allies, and our enemies are stronger. Radical Islam is on the rise; Iran's on the verge of acquiring a nuclear weapon; China is waging cyber warfare against America. General Soleimani, the Iranian general is the head of the al Quds forces and directly responsible for the murder of over 500 American servicemen in Iraq--part of this Iranian deal was lifting the international sanctions on General Soleimani. The day General Soleimani flew back from Moscow to Iran was the day we believed that Russia used cyber warfare against the Joint Chiefs. We need a new commander in chief that will stand up to our enemies, and that will have credibility.

Click for Ted Cruz on other issues.   Source: Fox News/Facebook Top Ten First Tier debate transcript

Donald Trump on China: (Civil Rights Aug 2, 2015)
Obama's presidency has done nothing for African Americans

Q: You said of Barack Obama, "Sadly, because he's done such a poor job as president, you won't see another black president for generations." What did you mean by that?

TRUMP: Well, I think he's been a very poor president. We have $18 trillion right now in debt and going up rapidly. We don't have victories anymore. China is killing us on trade. Mexico's killing us at the border and also killing us on trade.

Q: I understand your critique, but why we won't see another black president for generations?

TRUMP: Because I think that he has set a very poor standard and it's a shame for the African American people. He really has done nothing for African Americans. You look at what's gone on with their income levels, and with their youth. They have problems now in terms of unemployment numbers. We have a black president who's done very poorly for the African Americans of this country.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2015 interviews of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Jobs Aug 2, 2015)
Take jobs back from foreign countries to lower unemployment

My policy is going to be something that's going to set the country back right. I mean, one of the big things is we have to take back jobs from China.

We have to take back jobs from Japan, and Vietnam, and Mexico, and virtually everybody that's taking our jobs and ruining our manufacturing base. And we have to put people to work. Because the real unemployment number is probably 21%. People give up looking for jobs. And they no longer become a statistic. And it's very unfair. So we have to put our country back to work. We have to get great jobs for people and good paying jobs for people. And we're going to be just fine.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press 2015 interviews of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Energy & Oil Jun 28, 2015)
Maybe some climate change is manmade, but not all

Q: The overwhelming majority of scientists say climate change is real and it's manmade.

A: Well, there could be some manmade, too. I mean, I'm not saying there's zero, but not nearly to the extent [others say]. When Obama gets up and said it's the number one problem of our country--and, if it is, why is it that we have to clean up our factories now, and China doesn't have to do it for another 30 or 35 years in their wonderful agreement, you know, our wonderful negotiators?

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2015 interview series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on China: (Free Trade Jun 16, 2015)
China and Japan are beating us; I can beat China

Our country is in serious trouble. We don't have victories anymore. We used to have victories, but we don't have them. When was the last time anybody saw us beating, let's say, China in a trade deal? They kill us. I beat China all the time. All the time.

When did we beat Japan at anything? They send their cars over by the millions, and what do we do? When was the last time you saw a Chevrolet in Tokyo? It doesn't exist, folks. They beat us all the time.

When do we beat Mexico at the border? They're laughing at us, at our stupidity. And now they are beating us economically. They are not our friend, believe me. But they're killing us economically. The U.S. has become a dumping ground for everybody else's problems.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2015 announcement speeches of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Jun 14, 2015)
Base trade policy on working families, not multinationals

Q: The president says that expanding trade helps service industries & opens new markets. You talk about workers that would lose their job from trade. They say this will open up markets that will increase jobs.

SANDERS: I have been hearing that argument for the last 25 years. I heard it about NAFTA. I heard it about CAFTA. I heard it about permanent normal trade relations with China. Here is the fact. Since 2001, we have lost almost 60,000 factories and millions of good-paying jobs. I'm not saying trade is the only reason, but it is a significant reason why Americans are working longer hours for low wages and why we are seeing our jobs go to China and other low-wage countries. And, finally, what you're seeing in Congress are Democrats and some Republicans beginning to stand up and say, maybe we should have a trade policy which represents the working families of this country, that rebuilds our manufacturing base, not than just representing the CEOs of large multinational corporations.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2015 coverage:2016 presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Apr 19, 2015)
Wrong, wrong, wrong that trade deals create jobs here

Q: As secretary of state, Clinton said she favored a trade deal with our 11 Pacific partners & fast track authority to make that happen. Is that an issue for you?

SANDERS: In the House and Senate, I voted against all of these terrible trade agreements, NAFTA, CAFTA, permanent normal trades relations with China. Republicans and Democrats, they say, "oh, we'll create all these jobs by having a trade agreement with China." Well, the answer is, they were wrong, wrong, wrong. Over the years, we have lost millions of decent paying jobs. These trade agreements have forced wages down in America so the average worker in America today is working longer hours for lower wages.

Q: So, is that a litmus test for you, to see whether or not Clinton is going to come out against the TPP?

SANDERS: I hope very much the secretary comes out against it. I think we do not need to send more jobs to low wage countries. I think corporate America has to start investing in this country and create decent paying jobs here.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday 2015 coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on China: (Corporations Mar 21, 2015)
Worker-owned cooperatives instead of corporate tax breaks

We need to develop new economic models to increase job creation and productivity. Instead of giving huge tax breaks to corporations which ship our jobs to China and other low-wage countries, we need to provide assistance to workers who want to purchase their own businesses by establishing worker-owned cooperatives. When workers have an ownership stake in the businesses they work for, productivity goes up, absenteeism goes down and employees are much more satisfied with their jobs.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, BernieSanders.com

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Mar 21, 2015)
End disastrous NAFTA, CAFTA, and PNTR with China

Since 2001 we have lost more than 60,000 factories in this country, and more than 4.9 million decent-paying manufacturing jobs. We must end our disastrous trade policies (NAFTA, CAFTA, PNTR with China, etc.) which enable corporate America to shut down plants in this country and move to China and other low-wage countries. We need to end the race to the bottom and develop trade policies which demand that American corporations create jobs here, and not abroad.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, BernieSanders.com

Barack Obama on China: (Energy & Oil Jan 20, 2015)
China has agreed with US; rest of world will now follow

Over the past six years, we've done more than ever before to combat climate change, from the way we produce energy, to the way we use it. That's why we've set aside more public lands and waters than any administration in history. And that's why I will not let this Congress endanger the health of our children by turning back the clock on our efforts. I am determined to make sure American leadership drives international action. In Beijing, we made an historic announcement--the United States will double the pace at which we cut carbon pollution, and China committed, for the first time, to limiting their emissions. And because the world's two largest economies came together, other nations are now stepping up, and offering hope that, this year, the world will finally reach an agreement to protect the one planet we've got.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2015 State of the Union address

Barack Obama on China: (Free Trade Jan 20, 2015)
21st century businesses need to sell more overseas

21st century businesses, including small businesses, need to sell more American products overseas. Today, our businesses export more than ever, and exporters tend to pay their workers higher wages. But as we speak, China wants to write the rules for the world's fastest-growing region. That would put our workers and businesses at a disadvantage. Why would we let that happen? We should write those rules. We should level the playing field. That's why I'm asking both parties to give me trade promotion authority to protect American workers, with strong new trade deals from Asia to Europe that aren't just free, but fair.

Look, I'm the first one to admit that past trade deals haven't always lived up to the hype. But 95% of the world's customers live outside our borders, and we can't close ourselves off from those opportunities. More than half of manufacturing executives have said they're actively looking at bringing jobs back from China. Let's give them one more reason to get it done.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2015 State of the Union address

Bernie Sanders on China: (Free Trade Jan 15, 2015)
Stop TPP, the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Trade Policies that Benefit American Workers:
Since 2001 we have lost more than 60,000 factories in this country, and more than 4.9 million decent-paying manufacturing jobs. We must end our disastrous trade policies (NAFTA, CAFTA, PNTR with China, etc.) which enable corporate America to shut down plants in this country and move to China and other low-wage countries. We need to end the race to the bottom and develop trade policies which demand that American corporations create jobs here, and not abroad.

[We should also] sign the petition to stop the Trans-Pacific Partnership--another trade deal disaster.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 12 Steps Forward, by Sen. Bernie Sanders

Rand Paul on China: (Foreign Policy Dec 18, 2014)
50-year embargo with Cuba hasn't worked; lift it

In a radio interview, Sen. Rand Paul took a very different tack from his Republican colleagues in responding to President Obama's decision to reopen diplomatic relations with Cuba. Paul told Tom Roten, a radio host in Huntington WV:

Q: What are your thoughts on the president's deal here with Cuba?

PAUL: I grew up in a family that was about as anti-Communist as you could come by. And when we first opened up trade with China we were thinking it was a bad idea. But over time, I've come to believe that trading with China is the best way to actually, ultimately, defeat Communism. You know, the 50-year embargo with Cuba just hasn't worked. I mean, if the goal was regime change, it sure doesn't seem to be working. And probably it punishes the people more than the regime, because the regime can blame the embargo for hardship. And if there's open trade, I think the people will see all the things that we produce under capitalism. So in the end, I think probably opening up Cuba is a good idea.

Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: National Journal 2014 coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Kirsten Gillibrand on China: (Foreign Policy Sep 9, 2014)
1995: Inspired by women's rights as human rights

On September 5, 1995, at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. Hillary said her line about women's rights being human rights, a line I've repeated almost once a week for the past ten years. Her words were so simple, brave, and powerful, and when I heard them, something woke up in me. I cared about China. I'd majored in Asian studies, and spent a semester there in college, devastated by the poverty and pollution but inspired by the culture and the strength of its people. I even spoke passable Mandarin. With her words, Hillary put me back in touch with my childhood dream. I needed to alter the course of my life and get involved in politics. That was who I was and who I had always wanted to be. It was time to embrace what mattered to me most and overcome my fear that others would disapprove of my ambition or view me as presumptuous or entitled.
Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Off the Sidelines, by Kirsten Gillibrand, p. 28

Hillary Clinton on China: (Energy & Oil Jun 10, 2014)
$100B per year by 2020 for climate change mitigation

[At a climate change summit, I said] the US was prepared to lead a collective effort by developed countries to mobilize $100 billion annually by 2020 from a combination of public and private sources to help the most vulnerable nations mitigate the damage from climate change--if we could also reach a broad agreement on limiting emissions.

By offering a concrete commitment, I hoped to breathe new life into the talks, put pressure on China and the other "emerging emitters" to respond, and win support from developing countries.

In the end, the leaders fashioned a deal that, while far from perfect, put us on the road to future progress. For the first time all major economies, developed and developing alike, agreed to make national commitments to curb carbon emissions through 2020 and report transparently on their mitigation efforts. The world began moving away from the division between developed and developing countries that had defined the Kyoto agreement. This was a foundation to build on.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p.498-500

Hillary Clinton on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 10, 2014)
China never fits neatly into category like friend or rival

The US-China relationship is still full of challenges. We are two large, complex nations with profoundly different histories, political systems, and outlooks, whose economies and futures have become deeply entwined. This isn't a relationship that fits neatly into categories like friend or rival, and it may never. We are sailing in uncharted waters.

[In my 1998 China trip as First Lady], I came home from the trip convinced that if China over time embraces reform and modernization, it could become a constructive world power and an important partner for the US.

I returned to China as Secretary in February 2009 with the goal of building a relationship durable enough to weather the inevitable disputes and crises that would arise. I also wanted to embed the China relationship in our broader Asia strategy, engaging Beijing in the region's multilateral institutions [based on] agreed-upon rules. [But] we would not sacrifice our values or our traditional allies in order to win better terms with China.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p. 65-7

Hillary Clinton on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 10, 2014)
Get China involved with North Korea diplomacy

Many of North Korea's 25 million people live in abject poverty. Yet the regime devotes most of its limited resources to supporting its military, developing nuclear weapons, and antagonizing its neighbors.

In my public remarks [in Feb. 2009] in Seoul I extended an invitation to the North Koreans. If they would completely and verifiably eliminate their nuclear weapons program, we would be willing to normalize relations, and assist in meeting the economic and humanitarian needs of the North Korean people. If not, the regime's isolation would continue. It was an opening gambit that was not one I thought likely to succeed. But we started off with the offer of engagement knowing it would be easier to get other nations to pressure North Korea if and when the offer was rejected. It was particularly important for China, a longtime patron and protector of the regime in Pyongyang, to be part of a united international front. [The opening failed, as have numerous others since then].

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p. 53-4

Hillary Clinton on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 10, 2014)
Embed China within broader Asia strategy

I returned to China as Secretary in February 2009 with the goal of building a relationship durable enough to weather the inevitable disputes and crises that would arise. I also wanted to embed the China relationship in our broader Asia strategy, engaging Beijing in the region's multilateral institutions in ways that would encourage it to work with its neighbors according to agreed-upon rules. At the same time, I wanted China to know that it was not the sole focus of our attention in Asia. We would not sacrifice our values or our traditional allies in order to win better terms with China. Despite its impressive economic growth and advances in military capacity, it had not yet come close to surpassing the US as the most powerful nation in the Asia-Pacific. We were prepared to engage from a position of strength.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p. 66-7

Hillary Clinton on China: (Foreign Policy Jun 10, 2014)
Balance American interests between China & Korea

I decided to use my first trip as Secretary to accomplish three goals: visit our key Asian allies, Japan and South Korea; reach out to Indonesia; an emerging regional power and the home of ASEAN; and begin our crucial engagement with China.

We talked about how to balance America's interests in Asia, which sometimes seemed in competition. For example, how hard could we push the Chinese on human rights or climate change and still gain their support on security issues like Iran and North Korea Q [to Gov. O'Malley]: How many Syrian refugees should the US take in?

O'MALLEY: I was the first person on this stage to say that we should accept the 65,000 Syrian refugees that were fleeing the sort of murder of ISIL, and I believe that that needs to be done with proper screening.

Q: Secretary Clinton, how do you propose we screen those coming in to keep citizens safe?

CLINTON: I think that is the number one requirement. I also said that we should take increased numbers of refugees.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Link

Hillary Clinton on China: (Free Trade Jun 10, 2014)
China benefits from WTO and should play by WTO rules

We should focus on ending currency manipulation, environmental destruction and miserable working conditions [in China]. I acknowledge the challenge of lifting millions of people out of poverty. China argued this outweighed any obligation to play by established rules. I countered that China and other emerging economies had benefited greatly from the system the US had helped create, including their membership in the World Trade Organization, and now they needed to take their share of responsibility.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p.513

Marty Walsh on China: (Energy & Oil Mar 16, 2014)
Vice chair of Climate-Smart Low-Carbon Cities Summit

Mayors from China and the US will gather in Boston next year for the Climate-Smart Low-Carbon Cities Summit. Participants believe that, "As part of the climate change problem, cities also have the opportunity to be integral to its solution." As vice chair of the group, Mayor Walsh flew to Beijing (with travel expenses paid for by Bloomberg Philanthropies) alongside Secretary of State John Kerry. Alongside Secretary Kerry and local Chinese leaders, Walsh announced plans for the 2017 meeting.
Click for Marty Walsh on other issues.   Source: Christian Science Monitor on 2021 Biden Cabinet

Rand Paul on China: (Free Trade Jan 16, 2014)
China trade improves economy AND makes fight less likely

When I was about ten years old, like many conservative middle-class families, our inclination was to resist anything to do with Red China. In that black and white world, you were either for us or against us. Trade with China was thought to be trade with the enemy. A funny thing happened, though, along the way. Many conservatives came to understand a larger truth. As trade began to blossom with China, many conservatives, myself included, came to admit that trade improves our economic well-being AND makes us less likely to fight. The success of trade with China made many conservatives rethink their view of the world.

People sometimes ask me what my worldview is. My response is that even if you've crisscrossed the globe, I'm not sure that the world doesn't change by the time you return to the same spot twice. I really am a believer that foreign policy must be viewed by events as they present themselves, not as we wish them to be.

Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: Rand Paul OpEd in The National Interest

Mike Pence on China: (Free Trade Jan 15, 2014)
Favors free trade, but not tariff dodging from China

Pence asked U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman to look into U.S. Steel's allegations, including that Chinese steelmakers dodge tariffs by misrepresenting what country the steel comes from. The (Munster) Times reports that U.S. Steel has filed a trade case that could result in a ban on all Chinese imports deemed unfairly traded. Pence says he favors free trade but he called U.S. Steel's allegations against China serious.
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Associated Press on 2016 Indiana gubernatorial race

Mike Pence on China: (Free Trade Jan 15, 2014)
Favors free trade, but not tariff dodging from China

Pence asked U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman to look into U.S. Steel's allegations, including that Chinese steelmakers dodge tariffs by misrepresenting what country the steel comes from. The (Munster) Times reports that U.S. Steel has filed a trade case that could result in a ban on all Chinese imports deemed unfairly traded. Pence says he favors free trade but he called U.S. Steel's allegations against China serious.
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Associated Press on 2016 Indiana gubernatorial race

Rand Paul on China: (Jobs Jan 11, 2014)
Unemployment insurance ok if fully paid for & short-term

Q: What about extending benefits to the unemployed? President Obama in his weekly address said it's cruel to deny those benefits.

PAUL: Well, I think what's really cruel is to have an economy that doesn't have jobs in it. So we have to talk about what policy creates jobs. With regard to unemployment insurance, I'm not opposed to unemployment insurance, I am opposed to having it without paying for it. I think it's wrong to borrow money from China or simply to print up money for it. But I'm not against having unemployment insurance. I do think, though, that the longer you have it, that it provides some disincentive to work, and that there are many studies that indicate this.

Q: But if this extension is paid for, you can support it

PAUL: Well, what I have always said is that it needs to be paid for, but we also need to do something for long-term unemployed people, and that is, we need to create something new that creates jobs.

Click for Rand Paul on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2014 series of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Cory Booker on China: (Free Trade Nov 3, 2013)
China cheats via currency manipulation & IP theft

As China expands its economy, grows its military, and competes on the world stage, it is essential for them to play by the rules. Thankfully, China needs us--and there are countless areas where our countries cooperate to advance shared priorities.

American workers can compete and win on a level playing field, which is why China's cheating--through artificially depressing its currency and other unfair trade practices--is so damaging. While currency appreciation has occurred, keeping it artificially low hurts our economic competitiveness and undermines the trust that is essential to a strong relationship. That doesn't mean we should start a trade war--that would hurt our economy just as much as it would hurt China's. Instead, our goal should be a level playing field that treats everyone fairly, and that includes cracking down on unfair practices, such as unreasonable market barriers and Intellectual Property theft, that often break China's commitments to us and the rest of the world.

Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: 2013-2014 New Jersey Senate campaign web CoryBooker.com

Cory Booker on China: (Free Trade Aug 5, 2013)
China is engaging in unfair trade practices

[All four Democratic candidates] showed few differences in how the US should approach its relationship with China, saying that its economic rise is a good thing but that it is engaging in unfair trade practices.
Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: Star-Ledger coverage of 2013 N.J. Senate debate

Joe Biden on China: (Energy & Oil May 9, 2013)
Switch China from coal to gas, instead of carbon tax

Q: You mentioned a carbon tax. Is the Obama administration going to follow the lead of China and propose such a policy?

A: The truth is, right now, no, because we know it will go nowhere. Look, one of the things we are doing, and the president is asking me to kind of get ahead of here, is that we have a real chance, both in this hemisphere and with China, to enter into joint ventures on renewable energy and on cleaner-burning natural gas. Let me give you an example: The Chinese are building something like one new coal-fired plant a week. The Chinese have figured out that they have a giant environmental problem. Folks in Beijing, some days, literally can't breathe. So we have a great opportunity here to figure out how we can not only begin to wean ourselves off of carbon-based fuels but wean the world off of them too. It's just a gigantic opportunity, and it produces a boatload of jobs. There are going to be 600,000 new jobs out there in the gas industry over the next 10 to 12 years.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Douglas Brinkley in Rolling Stone Magazine

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 12, 2013)
China's growth & stability depends on US Pacific presence

I spent 10 days together with Vice President Xi of China. And we both acknowledged that the most dangerous thing is a misunderstanding. The only conflict worse than one that is intended, as my father would say, was one that's unintended. For example, I referred to the China Sea. I pointed out it's not China's sea; it's international waters. It's a matter of laying out clearly what the parameters of the relationship are and those of the neighbors.

If we do our job correctly and we interface directly with the leadership, there will be intense competition, there will be occasional misunderstandings, but our children will not be looking at China as a sworn enemy. I do not believe that's in the cards. I believe there is healthy competition from a growing, emerging China, which I would argue is in the interest of all of us. One of the reasons China has been able to have this period of sustained growth and stability is because of a US presence in the Pacific, not in spite of.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Speech at the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany

Barack Obama on China: (Jobs Feb 12, 2013)
Make America a magnet for new jobs and manufacturing

Our first priority is making America a magnet for new jobs and manufacturing. After shedding jobs for more than 10 years, our manufacturers have added about 500,000 jobs over the past three. Ford is bringing jobs back from Mexico. After locating plants in other countries like China, Intel is opening its most advanced plant right here at home. And this year, Apple will start making Macs in America again.

There are things we can do, right now, to accelerate this trend. Last year, we created our first manufacturing innovation institute in Youngstown, Ohio. There's no reason this can't happen in other towns. So tonight, I'm announcing the launch of three more of these manufacturing hubs, where businesses will partner with the Departments of Defense and Energy to turn regions left behind by globalization into global centers of high-tech jobs. And I ask this Congress to help create a network of fifteen of these hubs and guarantee that the next revolution in manufacturing is Made in America.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2013 State of the Union Address

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 10, 2013)
Open dialogue means no military conflict with China

Q: On China--how concerned are you about the conflicts brewing in the Pacific? What are the administration's plans to make sure that this will develop into a constructive partnership and not into a kind of new Cold War confrontation?

A: I am confident that it's in the interests of China and the emerging Chinese leadership that it not result in conflict. The last thing that they need at this moment is to engage in anything remotely approaching military competition with the US. I do not believe that is their intention. It clearly is not our intention. The most important thing to assure that this not occur is to have a frank, straightforward, private dialogue with the emerging leadership in China, letting them know what our interests are, letting them know what we believe our role is, and let them make judgments about whether or not that in any way conflicts with their growth patterns or their ability to maintain their own national security interest.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Speech at the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany

Joe Biden on China: (Foreign Policy Feb 6, 2013)
Rise of peaceful, responsible China in the interests of all

Tip O'Neill used to say, all politics is local. I believe all politics, particularly international politics, is personal. I think personal relationships matter. So when I visited China I made it absolutely clear that the United States does not view China with hostile intent and that we can cooperate and compete simultaneously. I've said many times, the rise of a peaceful and responsible China that contributes to global security and prosperity is in the interests of all nations.

And we all have a role to play in encouraging Beijing to define its interests more in terms of common global concerns than merely introspective concerns. The United States is a Pacific power. The bottom line is that the USA has an important and specific interest in an Asia-Pacific region that is peaceful and growing--as do our Russian friends and our Japanese friends. So we ought to intensify our cooperation in advance of those interests, moving forward together.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Speech at the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany

Hillary Clinton on China: (War & Peace Jan 29, 2013)
Policy of prevention, not containment, on Iranian nukes

Q: Your predecessor, Henry Kissinger, said that if Iran gets a nuclear weapon, that it is a turning point in history.

A: Our policy is prevention, not containment. And we have, through hard work with the international community, imposed the toughest set of sanctions on any country. We know it's having an effect. We have to continue to keep them isolated, and keep Russia and China on board. [But] we've said from the very beginning, we're open to diplomacy. We are doing so in the so-called P5-plus-1 format.

Q: What about military action against them?

A: Well, we've always said all options are on the table. The president has been very clear about that. [With regards to the] terrorism aspect of Iran's behavior, when I came into office, there were too many countries that were turning a blind eye to it. We have worked very hard to get the international community to say these guys need to be stopped on the terrorism front. They cannot be permitted to go forward.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Obama Cabinet:Fox News On the Record with Greta Van Susteren

Tulsi Gabbard on China: (Immigration Nov 6, 2012)
Relax onerous visa requirements for Indian & Chinese tourism

In Congress, I will fight to relax the onerous and overly burdensome visa requirements for visitors coming from countries such as China and India. The present policies are outdated and do not reflect the fact that China and India now have booming economies and a burgeoning middle class. These people have money in their pockets and are eager to see the world. Many of them want to visit Hawai`i, but because it's so hard for them to get tourist visas, they end up going elsewhere. The beaches of Bali, Thailand, and Vietnam are teeming with big-spending Chinese tourists. If we can get these visitors to come to Hawai`i instead, it will have an immediate and significant impact on Hawai`i's tourism industry.
Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: 2012 House campaign website, votetulsi.com, "Issues"

Barack Obama on China: (Corporations Oct 22, 2012)
If we had let GM go bankrupt, we'd be buying Chinese cars

ROMNEY: China can be our partner. But that doesn't mean they can just roll all over us and steal our jobs on an unfair basis.

OBAMA: Well, Governor Romney's right. You are familiar with jobs being shipped overseas, because you invested in companies that were shipping jobs overseas. And, you know, that's your right. I mean, that's how our free market works. But I've made a different bet on American workers. You know, if we had taken your advice, Governor Romney, about our auto industry, we'd be buying cars from China instead of selling cars to China. If we take your advice with respect to how we change our tax codes so that companies that are in profits overseas don't pay U.S. taxes compared to companies here that are paying taxes, now, that's estimated to create 800,000 jobs. The problem is they won't be here; they'll be in places like China. Now, with respect to what we've done with China already, US exports have doubled, since I came into office, to China.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Third Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Barack Obama on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 22, 2012)
Pivot to East Asia; America is a Pacific power

ROMNEY: We can be a partner with China. Now, they look at us and say, is it a good idea to be with America? How strong are we going to be? How strong is our economy? They look at the fact that we owe them $1 trillion and owe other people $16 trillion. They look at our decision to cut back on our military capabilities--a trillion dollars. They look at America's commitments around the world and they see what's happening and they say, well, OK, is America going to be strong? And the answer is yes. If I'm president, America will be very strong.

OBAMA: When it comes to our military and Chinese security, part of the reason that we were able to pivot to the Asia-Pacific region after having ended the war in Iraq and transitioning out of Afghanistan, is precisely because this is going to be a massive growth area in the future. And we believe China can be a partner, but we're also sending a very clear signal that America is a Pacific power, that we are going to have a presence there.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Third Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Barack Obama on China: (Free Trade Oct 22, 2012)
China is an adversary but also a potential partner

Q: What do you believe is the greatest future threat to the national security of this country? Is it China?

OBAMA: I think it will continue to be terrorist networks. We have to remain vigilant. But with respect to China, China's both an adversary but also a potential partner in the international community if it's following the rules. So my attitude coming into office was that we are going to insist that China plays by the same rules as everybody else. And I know Americans had seen jobs being shipped overseas, businesses and workers not getting a level playing field when it came to trade. And that's the reason why I set up a trade task force to go after cheaters when it came to international trade. We have brought more cases against China for violating trade rules than the previous administration had done in two terms. And we've won just about every case that we've filed. Just recently, steelworkers in Ohio & Pennsylvania, are in a position now to sell steel to China because we won that case.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Third Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Barack Obama on China: (Tax Reform Oct 22, 2012)
Tax cuts won't help us compete with China; invest instead

In order for us to be competitive, we're going to have to make some smart choices right now. Cutting our education budget--that's not a smart choice. That will not help us compete with China. Cutting our investments in research and technology--that's not a smart choice. That will not help us compete with China. Adding $7 trillion of tax cuts and military spending that our military's not asking for before we even get to the debt that we currently have--that is not going to make us more competitive. Those are the kinds of choices that the American people face right now. Having a tax code that rewards companies that are shipping jobs overseas instead of companies that are investing here in the US--that will not make us more competitive. After a decade in which we saw drift, jobs being shipped overseas, nobody championing American workers and American businesses, we've now begun to make some real progress. We can't go back to the same policies that got us into such difficulty in the first place.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Third Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Barack Obama on China: (Energy & Oil Oct 16, 2012)
Invest in clean energy because China & Germany will

Q: Your energy secretary, Steven Chu, states it's not policy of his department to help lower gas prices. Do you agree?

OBAMA: We can't just produce traditional source of energy. We've also got to look to the future. That's why we doubled fuel efficiency standards on cars. That means that in the middle of the next decade, any car you buy, you're going to end up going twice as far on a gallon of gas. That's why we doubled clean energy production like wind and solar and biofuels. Now, Governor Romney will say he's got an all-of-the-above plan, but he's got the oil and gas part, but he doesn't have the clean energy part. And if we are only thinking about tomorrow or the next day and not thinking about 10 years from now, we're not going to control our own economic future. Because China, Germany, they're making these investments. And I'm not going to cede those jobs of the future to those countries. That's going to make sure that you're not paying as much for gas.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Second Obama-Romney 2012 debate

Barack Obama on China: (Foreign Policy Oct 16, 2012)
We pushed China hard to raise currency exchange by 11%

ROMNEY: On day one, I will label China a currency manipulator.

OBAMA: As far as currency manipulation, [China's] currency has actually gone up 11 percent since I've been president because we have pushed them hard. And we've put unprecedented trade pressure on China. That's why exports have significantly increased under my presidency. That's going to help to create jobs here.

Q: Apple iPhones are all manufactured in China. How do you convince Apple to bring that manufacturing back here?

ROMNEY: The answer is very straightforward. We can compete with anyone in the world as long as the playing field is level. China's been cheating over the years. One by holding down the value of their currency. Number two, by stealing our intellectual property; our designs, our patents, our technology. There's even an Apple store in China that's a counterfeit Apple store, selling counterfeit goods. They hack into our computers. We will have to have people play on a fair basis.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Second Obama-Romney 2012 debate

Barack Obama on China: (Jobs Oct 16, 2012)
We were losing 800,000 jobs each month when I started

We were losing 800,000 jobs a month when I started. But we had been digging our way out of policies that were misplaced and focused on the top doing very well and middle class folks not doing well. We've seen 31 consecutive months of job growth; 5.2 million new jobs created. The plans that I talked about will create even more. When Romney talks about getting tough on China, keep in mind that he invested in companies that were pioneers of outsourcing to China.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Second Obama-Romney 2012 debate

Barack Obama on China: (Jobs Oct 16, 2012)
Change offshore tax rules to bring back outsourced jobs

Q: What plans do you have to get outsourced jobs back?

ROMNEY: The place where we've seen manufacturing go has been China. On day one, I will label China a currency manipulator, which will allow me as president to be able to put in place tariffs.

OBAMA: I want to close loopholes that allow companies to deduct expenses when they move to China; that allow them to profit offshore. Now, Gov. Romney actually wants to expand those tax breaks. One of his big ideas when it comes to corporate tax reform would be to say, if you invest overseas, you make profits overseas, you don't have to pay US taxes. It's estimated that that will create 800,000 new jobs. The problem is they'll be in China. Or India. Or Germany. That's not the way we're going to create jobs here. The way we're going to create jobs here is not just to change our tax code, but also to double our exports. That's why we've kept on pushing trade deals, but trade deals that make sure that American workers are getting a good deal.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Second Obama-Romney 2012 debate

Barack Obama on China: (Technology Oct 16, 2012)
We need to train for the next generation of Apples

ROMNEY: [China got ahead] by stealing our intellectual property; our designs, our patents, our technology. There's even a counterfeit Apple store in China, selling counterfeit goods. They hack into our computers.

OBAMA: There are some jobs that are not going to come back. Because they are low wage, low skill jobs. I want high wage, high skill jobs. That's why we have to emphasize manufacturing. That's why we have to invest in advanced manufacturing. That's why we've got to make sure that we've got the best science and research in the world. And if we're cutting investments in research and science that will create the next Apple, create the next new innovation that will sell products around the world, we will lose that race. If we're not training engineers to make sure that they are equipped here in this country, then companies won't come here. Those investments are what's going to help to make sure that we continue to lead this world economy, not just next year, but 50 years from now.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Second Obama-Romney 2012 debate

Barack Obama on China: (Free Trade Sep 4, 2012)
Develop alternatives to importing rare earths from China

Q: China currently produces 97% of rare earth elements needed for advanced electronics. What steps should the federal government take to ensure the quality and availability of critical natural resources?

A: Rare earth elements and other critical minerals are used by American manufacturers to make high-tech products like the advanced batteries that power everything from hybrid cars to cell phones. My support for the development alternatives to rare earth materials is helping to ensure we have the materials necessary to propel our high-technology economy forward. Being able to manufacture competitive products in America is too important for us to stand by and do nothing. We've got to take control of our energy future, and we can't let the energy industry take root in other countries because they are allowed to break the rules. That's why we have joined with Japan and some of our European allies to bring a trade case against China for imposing restrictions on their exports of rare earth materials

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Top American Science Questions, by sciencedebate.org

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