Mike Bloomberg in United Nations


On Energy & Oil: US must set real and binding carbon reduction targets

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bali, which was my privilege to address, was an historic gathering. It set the stage for a global compact that advances the progress begun some 10 years ago at Kyoto.

However, between now and the Copenhagen Conference next year, we must establish, I think, the preconditions for such progress. Both developed and developing nations must recognize the need to alter their policies and make serious commitments to change. And I believe that our experience in New York City, and the experience of many of the world’s other great cities, too, can help guide that process.

The first precondition for making the Copenhagen negotiations a success, I believe, is that the US, which leads the world in greenhouse gas production, must finally set real and binding carbon reduction targets. And I believe the American people are prepared to accept our responsibility to lead by example.

Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods Feb 11, 2008

On Energy & Oil: Reducing carbon output increases socio-economic well-being

NYC’s experience is illustrative, because as we’ve embarked on reducing our carbon footprint, we’ve learned that reducing your carbon production increases the social and economic well-being of your people. Let me quickly cite four examples.
  1. We’re converting our city’s taxi fleet to hybrid cars, reducing carbon by 1/2%. It will also clean our air of pollutants.
  2. We’ve proposed a program of congestion pricing, designed to discourage driving in our busy business district during the peak weekday hours. It will also make our economy more productive, and finance the new transit lines we desperately need.
  3. We’re working to green our buildings--again, not just to cut carbon emissions, but also because it will allow us to redirect billions to better purposes.
  4. We’re planting one million trees throughout our city during the next ten years. They will not only capture carbon dioxide, but also clean the air, cool our streets, reduce street flooding, and raise property values.
Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods Feb 11, 2008

On Energy & Oil: Cities are taking the lead on climate change

Serious carbon targets will not hamper growth, and it will leave us all better off. If the US and the developing nations make such commitments, then the prospects for a new international global warming accord improve greatly. The world cannot wait for 2009. Global warming demands immediate action. The world’s great cities recognize that. Leaders in local governments around the globe are already moving aggressively and creatively to fight climate change.

It’s why, even though our national government has yet to approve the Kyoto Protocol, more than 700 cities in the US, representing more than 80 million Americans, have pledged to meet its goals. And it’s why, later this year, NYC will convene a 2-day conference of representatives from more than 20 major world cities. It will feature experts in such fields as transportation, city planning, public health; and it will address the challenges that the world’s cities share in reducing urban air pollution and curbing climate change.

Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods Feb 11, 2008

On Foreign Policy: Maintains mayoral office for UN relations, run by his sister

The United Nations has been, and always will be important to New York City for the vital work that you do and I think important to this country and to the world. And its importance to New York is shown by the fact that the Mayor’s office maintains a “Commission for the United Nations, Consular Corps, & Protocol,” whose commissioner is my sister, Marjorie Tiven.

Of course, being the Mayor of NYC--the world’s most international city--is a bit like presiding over the UN every single day of the year

Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods Feb 11, 2008

The above quotations are from Speeches at the United Nations.
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Page last updated: Feb 18, 2019