Deval Patrick in The Boston Globe


On Principles & Values: Joined Bain Capital, lecture tour "Reinvesting in America"

The former governor of Massachusetts who has largely shunned politics since leaving office and joining Bain Capital in 2015, is using some of his most direct language to date to acknowledge his interest in a presidential run in 2020.

"It's on my radar screen," Patrick told KCUR, a public radio station in Kansas City, where he was traveling last week for a civic event called "An Evening with Deval Patrick: Reinvesting in America."

Source: M. Levenson in Boston Globe on 2020 presidential hopefuls Jul 17, 2017

On Crime: Marathon bomber will die in prison, one way or another

Massachusetts Democrats, who also personally oppose the death penalty, straggled into line behind Attorney General Eric Holder's decision to seek the death penalty against the so-called Marathon bomber because of the targeting of an iconic event; Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

"One way or another, based on the evidence, Tsarnaev will die in prison," declared Gov. Deval Patrick. "The best we can do is remind each other that we are a stronger Commonwealth than ever and that nothing can break that spirit."

There's a Democrat in the White House, and Massachusetts Democrats don't want to cross him or his AG. There's also the posturing aspect of Holder's decision: seeking the death penalty increases the government's leverage to get a guilty verdict in return for life without parole. And to Massachusetts politicians, "Boston Strong" has come to mean looking tough to the nation on terrorism, not "squishy on crime."

Source: Boston Globe OpEd on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial race Jan 31, 2014

On Education: Supports unionized Horace Mann charter over regular charters

Patrick’s support of unionized Horace Mann schools is stronger than his support of non-union commonwealth charters. His education issue paper says: “I will support charter schools (especially Horace Mann charters) by developing funding mechanisms that do not disadvantage district schools and measuring charter schools in part by whether they are producing innovative ideas that can be imported into district schools.”
Source: Boston Globe Issue Outlines: Education Jun 3, 2006

On Education: Supports MCAS but would add a science test and other tests

He supports requiring students to pass the MCAS exam before they can graduate, and would add a test in science, but says the state should develop “additional assessment tools” so MCAS is not the only measure of a student’s academic progress.
Source: Boston Globe Issue Outlines: Education Jun 3, 2006

On Health Care: Supports employer uninsured healthcare assessment, plus more

Patrick was an early supporter of a bill proposed by Affordable Healthcare Today (ACT) that served as the basis for the recently approved universal healthcare law. The ACT bill would have spent more public money, taxed businesses more, and extended subsidized coverage further up the income ladder then the bill eventually approved by the Legislature. He supports the controversial $295 per worker, per year charge on larger employers who don’t offer health benefits, but says there is no need to raise additional revenue “until we see how this works and what costs we can take out.”

“I see health care as a common good -- like clean air, safe streets, and effective education -- and so I believe that government has a role to play in assuring that the conditions exist for the health care system we all want,” Patrick says.

Source: Boston Globe Issue Outlines: Health Care Jun 3, 2006

On Tax Reform: Restore local aid so towns can cut property taxes

Patrick opposes a cut in the income tax rates to 5 percent, something the other candidates at least give lip service to. “The fact is that rolling back the income tax from 5.3 to 5 percent is fiscally irresponsible. We can’t afford it,” he says. “The tax to cut is the property tax. And we can’t cut the property tax if we don’t restore local aid and we can’t restore local aid if we roll back the income tax.”
Source: Boston Globe Issue Outlines: Taxes Jun 3, 2006

On Tax Reform: Supports local meals tax and local-option taxes

Deval Patrick is the only candidate to endorse the idea of allowing Boston and other municipalities to impose a meals tax, or other local-option tax, saying they would help towns manage their budgets without having to raise local property taxes.
Source: Boston Globe Issue Outlines: Taxes Jun 3, 2006

On Education: Cap charter schools until funding formulas improved

Patrick continued to modify what he acknowledges is an evolving position of support for merit pay for teachers. He also qualified his endorsement of charter schools -- like merit pay, an issue that the teachers’ unions sharply oppose.

On merit pay, Patrick shifted from his support for rewards for individual teachers to saying he favors a system that would encourage collaboration within schools or teams of teachers by awarding bonuses more broadly based on a school’s overall improvement. The evaluation would not be based on MCAS test results, he said.

On quasi-public charter schools, Patrick said school districts must begin to incorporate those innovations that are proven to work into traditional public schools. He also said he favors a cap on the number of public schools until new funding formulas for charter schools are devised “that don’t drain” district school funding.

Source: Brian C. Mooney in Boston Globe Apr 30, 2006

On Principles & Values: Patrick wins first test at caucuses, by 2-1 margin

Patrick won big among delegates at caucuses [and in the statewide delegate count] leads Reilly almost 2-1. Patrick said his showing at the caucuses was “a victory for the grass roots.” But he downplayed expectations that the results would give him a majority at the convention. He needs 15% of convention delegates to be placed on the Sept. primary ballot. “The whole system favors insiders,” said Patrick when asked if this ensured a convention endorsement. “I just feel good we got ballot access.”
Source: By Frank Phillips and Scott Greenberger, Boston Globe Feb 5, 2006

On Abortion: Decisions on abortion should be made by women

A man carrying a red Bible to the microphone asked, How could Patrick support gay marriage and abortion rights if God doesn’t? Patrick treaded carefully. He said he believes decisions on abortion should be made by women, and not by the government, and that the law should regard everyone as equals, regardless of their sexual orientation. Patrick added that people are far less concerned about gay marriage and abortion than about paying their rent and heating bills.
Source: Scott Helman, Boston Globe, p. A1 Jan 15, 2006

On Civil Rights: Supports equal marriage rights for gays

A man carrying a red Bible to the microphone asked, How could Patrick support gay marriage if God doesn’t? Patrick treaded carefully. He said that the law should regard everyone as equals, regardless of their sexual orientation. Patrick added that people are far less concerned about gay marriage than about paying their rent and heating bills.

’’I am not going to pander to anybody for anything,“ Patrick said. ‘’I respect differences of opinion, but I have a point of view which I think is right on the law and right as a matter of fundamental fairness.“

Ultimately, said Melvin B. Miller, publisher and editor of the Bay State Banner, a newspaper serving the black community, many people will decide that it’s foolish not to support Patrick because of gay marriage. ‘’I mean, we’re not going to support a candidate of those qualifications? That’s not good enough?” said Miller, himself an opponent of same-sex marriage. ‘’That’s ridiculous.“

Source: Scott Helman, Boston Globe, p. A1 Jan 15, 2006

On Civil Rights: Former civil rights prosecutor under President Clinton

Patrick, a former civil rights prosecutor under President Clinton, makes clear he doesn’t want to be defined by his race, and he believes white voters care just as deeply about everything he talks about. ‘’Yes, I’m a black man. I know that. Other people know that. I’m proud of that. I’m completely at ease with that,“ he said in the interview. ‘’But that’s not all I am.” He tells the crowd, ‘’I do need to be not just the first black governor, but the best governor you’ve ever had.“
Source: Scott Helman, Boston Globe, p. A1 Jan 15, 2006

On Tax Reform: Allow cities to raise local meals tax-trust local officials

Former Assistant US Attorney General Deval L. Patrick said yesterday he would support giving Massachusetts cities and towns the right to raise local meals taxes, while his rival for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, Attorney General Thomas F. Reilly, flatly ruled out any such increase.

The sharp disagreement occurred during a face-to-face meeting between the two men before a key constituency--local officials. ‘’I am not in favor of any additional tax burdens on the people of Massachusetts,“ Reilly told the local officials.

But Patrick said he would support increases on what are known as local-option taxes, saying they would help cities and towns manage their budgets without having to raise local property taxes. ‘’I’m interested in trusting you -- the local officials,“ Patrick said. ‘’I know what’s happening in your communities.”

Source: Michael Levenson, Boston Globe, p. A1 Jan 15, 2006

On Principles & Values: Galvin withdraws; it’s head-to-head against Tom Reilly

Secretary of State William F. Galvin said yesterday he will not run for governor and instead will seek reelection to a fourth term, setting up a two-person battle for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination between Attorney General Thomas F. Reilly and former federal civil rights enforcer Deval Patrick.

Barring an unexpected entry in the race, Galvin’s decision means that Democrats will have a choice in next September’s party primary between Reilly, who is aiming his candidacy at moderates and

Source: Frank Phillips, Boston Globe Dec 13, 2005

On Principles & Values: Galvin withdraws; it’s head-to-head against Tom Reilly

Secretary of State William F. Galvin said yesterday he will not run for governor and instead will seek reelection to a fourth term, setting up a two-person battle for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination between Attorney General Thomas F. Reilly and former federal civil rights enforcer Deval Patrick.

Barring an unexpected entry in the race, Galvin’s decision means that Democrats will have a choice in next September’s party primary between Reilly, who is aiming his candidacy at moderates and independents, and Patrick, who seems to appeal strongly to the party’s liberal activists wing.

Former gubernatorial candidate Warren Tolman said, “The good news for Patrick is that he gets a one-on-one contrast with Reilly. The bad news is that Reilly has a huge lead. Galvin would have cut into Reilly’s voting base, Tolman said. ‘’They are Irish guys who live 2 miles apart from each other, who clearly would have attracted the same moderate Democrats.”

Source: Frank Phillips, Boston Globe Dec 13, 2005

The above quotations are from Media coverage of MA political races in The Boston Globe.
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