State of Mississippi Archives: on Principles & Values


Tate Reeves: AdWatch: defend "In God We Trust" on new car tag

Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves released a TV ad in June. In the ad, he promises to defend the new car tag, which features the state seal that reads "In God We Trust."

He has since continued beating that drum, invoking the names of top Washington Democrats and "out of state liberals," Antifa, Nike and Colin Kaepernick, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Bernie Sanders, former President Barack Obama and Eric Holder while boasting of his endorsement from the NRA and vowing to defend the state's new license tag.

Source: MississippiToday AdWatch:2018-19 Mississippi Governor race Jul 15, 2019

Tate Reeves: Mississippi is headed in the right direction

Reeves' chief objective in his 2019 campaign for governor is convincing Mississippians that he's done more good than bad for Mississippi, that the state after his eight years of leadership over the Senate is on the right track and he should be given at least four more years to build upon his body of work as Mississippi's chief executive.

His strategy [is] to avoid talking about serious problems that still exist in the state as doing so could jeopardize his "good body of work" argument. When he does talk policy on the trail, he touts gains made during his eight years in office such as increasing test scores and employment rates rather than forward-looking solutions.

"I think it's a pretty difficult argument to make that Mississippi isn't in far better shape today than we were eight years ago, and I think that's why you're seeing people in places like these rally behind our campaign," Reeves said. "The voters know things are better off, and they know we're headed in the right direction."

Source: MississippiToday.org on 2019 Mississippi Gubernatorial race Jul 15, 2019

Bill Waller: Service to God, to family, to state and country

In everything I've done in my life, I have believed in the concept of service--to the God that I serve, to my family that I love, to the state that is my home and to the country that is still the greatest hope for liberty and freedom in the world. For all of these reasons, I'm announcing my campaign to be your next Governor of Mississippi.

As a lifelong conservative, I won elections three times to the Mississippi Supreme Court, and I was honored to be endorsed by the Mississippi Republican Party because of my record, values and principles. Given the undeniable landscape of this year's election, I am the conservative Republican with the best chance to win in November.

Source: 2019 Mississippi Governor campaign website BillWallerJr.com May 2, 2019

Robert Foster: Conservative outsider; aligned with Trump on social media

State Rep. Robert Foster and former Justice Bill Waller Jr. faced off in the first debate. Foster has painted himself as a "conservative outsider," sought to align himself with President Donald Trump on many issues, and has garnered attention for controversial social media posts. He runs a DeSoto County agriculture tourism business that includes Christmas tree sales, a corn maze and berry picking. He said his experience running that business, overseeing 100 employees, was a needed perspective in state leadership.

Waller, meanwhile, has long avoided partisan politics because of his time on the Mississippi Supreme Court. He left the court in January. After announcing his candidacy last month, he's sought to portray himself as a steady, more traditional Republican candidate. He's said he's not interested in courting Trump and has a better chance of beating Democrat Jim Hood, the current attorney general, in the November election. Waller's late father served as governor from 1972 to 1976.

Source: Clarion-Ledger on 2019 Mississippi gubernatorial race Apr 2, 2019

Bill Waller: I'm a Republican; but voting in Democratic primaries ok

In the last three local elections in 2015, 2011 and 2007, Bill Waller, the now-declared Republican primary candidate for governor has voted in the Democratic primary, according to public voting records. The judicial elections in which he was a candidate are non-partisan. His father served as governor in the 1970s as a Democrat.

The Waller campaign says voting Democrat in primaries was not an indicator of party leanings or even a faux pas. Waller's vote in statewide Democrat primaries was done so he could vote in local elections he cared about that featured Democratic candidates he valued over Republican candidates. "Bill Waller is a conservative Republican who was endorsed by the Mississippi Republican Party when he was elected to the Supreme Court," said a statement issued by the campaign. "He's voted in Republican presidential primaries to support John McCain, Mitt Romney and Donald Trump.

Source: YallPolitics.com blog on 2019 Mississippi Governor's race Mar 1, 2019

Jim Hood: 1890s election law designed to disenfranchise blacks

Imagine a scenario where Hood garners 48% of the vote and Reeves gets 47%. In that scenario, the election for governor could be decided by the 122 members of the Mississippi House of Representatives. Mississippi's 1880s Constitution [requires that a] candidate for governor or for the other seven statewide offices garners a majority vote, and also requires the winning candidate to win a majority of the 122 House districts in order to capture the seat.

It is generally conceded the language was added to the 1890s Constitution by the white ruling class as a safeguard to ensure that African Americans, who were still a majority in Mississippi, would not win election to statewide office. By that time, laws also were being put in place to disenfranchise black voters and legislative districts were not based on population.

Legislation to change the Constitution so that the top vote-getter would win statewide posts is likely to die this session as it has in other sessions.

Source: Biloxi Sun-Herald on 2019 Mississippi Gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2019

Ronnie Musgrove: 1999: elected by state House vote, after plurality win

Imagine a scenario where Hood garners 48% of the vote and Reeves gets 47%. In that scenario, the election for governor could be decided by the 122 members of the Mississippi House of Representatives. Mississippi's 1880s Constitution [requires that a] candidate for governor or for the other seven statewide offices garners a majority vote, and also requires the winning candidate to win a majority of the 122 House districts in order to capture the seat.

After the 1999 election, one of the most memorable votes in the history of the House occurred when Republican Mike Parker--who lost the popular vote--refused to concede to Musgrove in the race for governor. Musgrove won a plurality of the votes and amazingly both candidates won 61 of the state's 122 House districts. By a vote of 86 to 36 the Democratic-controlled House elected fellow Democrat Musgrove. Most argued that it only made sense that the person who won the most votes should win the Governor's Mansion.

Source: Biloxi Sun-Herald on 2019 Mississippi Gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2019

Cindy Hyde-Smith: Promoted resolution celebrating Confederacy

Mississippi Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith once promoted a measure that praised a Confederate soldier's effort to "defend his homeland" and pushed a revisionist view of the Civil War. As a state senator in 2007, Hyde-Smith cosponsored a resolution that honored then-92-year-old Effie Lucille Nicholson Pharr, calling her "the last known living 'Real Daughter' of the Confederacy living in Mississippi." Pharr's father had been a Confederate soldier in Robert E. Lee's army in the Civil War. The resolution refers to the Civil War as "The War Between the States." It says her father "fought to defend his homeland and contributed to the rebuilding of the country." It says that with "great pride," Mississippi lawmakers "join the Sons of Confederate Veterans" to honor Pharr. The concurrent resolution was approved by Mississippi's House and Senate.
Source: CNN KFile on 2018 Mississippi Senate race Nov 26, 2018

Jim Hood: 1890 law requires winning majority AND state House districts

An anti-democratic relic of Mississippi's 1890 Jim Crow constitution could stand in Hood's way--even if he wins the most votes on Election Day.??? The provision requires gubernatorial candidates to win both a majority of the statewide vote and a majority of the 122 districts that make up the state House. If no candidate wins both the popular vote and a majority of districts, the state House then picks the winner from the top two finishers. That stacks the race against Hood or any other Democrat twice over: first, gerrymandered districts make it much harder for a Democrat to win a majority of House ; and second, because the GOP majority in the House could simply install the Republican candidate as governor even if he loses the statewide vote. That effectively gerrymanders the gubernatorial election in favor of the Republicans, since Hood would have to win the statewide vote by a wide margin in order to also carry a majority of House districts and avoid having his fate determined by the House.
Source: DailyKos.com blog on 2019 Mississippi Gubernatorial race Oct 5, 2018

Jim Hood: End self-dealing in Jackson

[In his campaign announcement speech], Hood took a subtle shot at Tate Reeves. In July, several outlets raised questions about what influence Reeves might have wielded to build a $2 million frontage road connecting his gated neighborhood to a state highway. Reeves denies any involvement. Hood's office has been investigating that allegation.

"I'm tired of self-dealing in Jackson," Hood said. "People are more worried about paving private driveways than they are about anything else."

Source: Mississippi Today on 2019 Mississippi Gubernatorial race Oct 3, 2018

Rev. Jesse Jackson: Abolish runoff elections; they hurt black candidates

Mississippi Democrat Mike Espy is running for the runoff--the sort of election that some African Americans have said for years is designed to keep them from winning.

The thinking about runoffs goes like this: A black candidate in the South could easily win a multi-candidate primary, as long as they get most of the black vote, which could be as high as the mid-to-low 30s. But in a one-on-one contest, the potential to add to that total is diminished.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, who made the abolishing runoffs a cornerstone of his unsuccessful 1984 Democratic presidential campaign, said "Historically, and in many instances today, whites support white candidate regardless of how qualified an African-American candidate is.

"Even if Mike Espy does make it to the runoff in Mississippi it is unlikely that he will win the runoff--whatever runoff system is used in Mississippi" despite having the highest percentage of African-American residents in the country at 37 percent, Jackson said.

Source: McClatchyDC.com on 2017-2018 Mississippi gubernatorial race Sep 12, 2018

Tate Reeves: Aligns God with prayers for both state and nation

This #NationalDayofPrayer, let us remember the power of God's love as we pray for our state and nation. I appreciate those who are gathered in faith on the steps of the state Capitol today.
Source: Twitter posting on 2018 Mississippi Senate race May 3, 2018

Phil Bryant: Created Imagine Mississippi PAC for post-term-limit career

Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, who is term limited, transferred his campaign cash last year to a political action committee called Imagine Mississippi PAC. In the annual report, Bryant's PAC reported $220,000 in spending in 2017, including donations to several Republican politicians and political candidates. The PAC reported $543,211.66 cash on hand.
Source: N.E.Miss. Daily Journal on 2019 Mississippi Governor race Feb 3, 2018

Jensen Bohren: Protect our inalienable rights

My personal values are American values. The founding document of our government stated that we have the inalienable rights of Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. Let's ensure those rights.
Source: Facebook posting on 2018 Mississippi Senate race Dec 31, 2017

Trent Lott: Led the Singing Senators, and started Seersucker Thursdays

Trent Lott and former Democratic Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle are about 27 chapters in on writing a book [which became "Crisis Point"]. It sounds like the political odd couple: "He and I, even though from different backgrounds--he was a South Dakota prairie liberal populist and I was a Southern Republican--we managed to work together day after day after day," Lott said.

"We had 9-11, the anthrax attack, impeachment of Clinton," Lott said. "But we managed to cut taxes, balance the budget, raise military pay."

Lott said Congress has become a mean and "dour" place, and it's affecting policy. "They don't have any fun," Lott said. "During my time in leadership I actually enjoyed it and had fun. They don't even smile any more. I had the Singing Senators quartet, and we started 'Seersucker Thursdays' so everyone would for one day look like a Southern politician," Lott said. "That's why I wore a kilt in the Senate one time--I had the worst looking legs in the Senate."

Source: N.E.Miss. Daily Journal on 2019 Mississippi Governor race May 9, 2015

Chris McDaniel: Runoff recount denied by Mississippi Supreme Court

The Mississippi Supreme Court on Thursday refused to reconsider its ruling denying state Sen. Chris McDaniel (R) access to unredacted poll books for inspection as he seeks to overturn a Senate primary.

McDaniel has yet to concede in his primary fight with Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.), despite Cochran's 7,667-vote lead in the runoff, now over a month ago.

The challenger has spent the past month poring over poll books looking for illegitimate votes and went to the state Supreme Court in pursuit of poll books without personal information removed, but was denied once before. That information, which includes birthdates, would help him evaluate whether any residents who voted in the Democratic primary came out to vote again in the Republican runoff, an action barred by Mississippi elections law.

Cochran made an aggressive play for African American Democrats in the runoff, and McDaniel's supporters believe much of Cochran's win margin is comprised of "illegitimate crossover votes."

Source: The Hill weblog on 2014 Mississippi Senate race Jul 25, 2014

Chris McDaniel: OpEd: Cochran accused of courting blacks for runoff vote

Chris McDaniel condemned racially charged questions asked by an unidentified participant during a press call with aides to Sen. Thad Cochran. Given a chance to comment on the remarks in a CNN interview on Friday, Cochran's GOP Senate primary challenger in Mississippi condemned them but said his campaign doesn't know anything about the caller. "Certainly, we condemn any racist comments whatsoever, but bear in mind, we have no idea who that person is," McDaniel said. "Neither do you. So, you understand there are people out there we have no control over. We have no idea who that person is."

In a media call on Wednesday with Cochran aides, an anonymous caller repeatedly asked questions about the senator's interaction with African-American voters. "If black people were harvesting cotton, why is it OK to harvest their votes?" the caller asked. Some McDaniel supporters have accused the Cochran campaign of paying African-Americans to vote for the senator in the runoff.

Source: Politico.com weblog on 2014 Mississippi Senate race Jul 4, 2014

Chris McDaniel: Judeo-Christian values established our government framework

Question topic: Efforts to bring Islamic law (shariah) to America do not pose a threat to our country and its Constitution.

McDaniel: Strongly Disagree

Question topic: Judeo-Christian values established a framework of morality which permitted our system of limited government.

McDaniel: Strongly Agree.

Question topic: Briefly describe your spiritual beliefs and values.

McDaniel: I'm a Southern Baptist, saved by God's grace at the age of 13.

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 Mississippi Senate race Jul 2, 2014

Chris McDaniel: Revive America's Christian foundation

State Sen. Chris McDaniel (R) challenged a church crowd here to fight to revive America's Christian foundation during a Sunday speech at a southern Mississippi Pentecostal church. "Today is the day we begin to fight again," he told about 80 worshipers gathered at the Word Alive Revival Center. "Go back out in your communities and make a difference again. It can't just stop at the church. Take it out to the streets. That's when you begin to reclaim your country again."

The Tea Party-backed candidate made no mention of his own challenge to Sen. Thad Cochran. Instead, McDaniel delivered a political sermon of sorts, drawing from the scripture of the Founding Fathers to make a case for Christians to stand up and fight to reclaim America's culture and reestablish the nation's Christian foundation. He quoted an array of American figures endorsing America's Christian values and encouraging a God-fearing nation, including John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and others.

Source: The Hill e-zine on 2014 Mississippi Senate race May 18, 2014

Thad Cochran: AdWatch: American Conservative Union's lowest-scored Senator

Thad Cochran is tied for the lowest rating of any Republican facing a primary challenge this cycle on a new conservative scorecard. The scorecard, from the American Conservative Union (ACU), gives Cochran a 60% for 2013.

Cochran is considered the most vulnerable Republican senator in a primary this cycle; he has faced heavy attacks from national conservative groups, which point to Cochran's votes to raise the debt limit, among others, as evidence he's not conservative enough.

He received the third- lowest score on the Club for Growth's annual scorecard, released last week, and the Club has been hitting him with ads on TV and radio. His challenger, state Sen. Chris McDaniel, has the backing of most of the prominent national conservative groups.

Source: The Hill e-zine PacWatch on 2014 Mississippi Senate race Feb 28, 2014

Phil Bryant: Four fundamental beliefs guide our plan for the future

We understand that a vision without action is just an illusion, so we set about with four fundamental beliefs guiding our plan for the future.
  1. We believe every Mississippian should have the opportunity to be gainfully employed right here at home;
  2. Every Mississippian must have the opportunity to learn from the best educational system we can offer;
  3. We believe that every Mississippian deserves to be born into a mature, two-parent family;
  4. We believe that every Mississippian should be certain that his or her tax dollars are put to proper use. I believe that these four goals achieved together will create a Mississippi of limitless opportunity. Let us see how the plan has worked thus far.
    Source: 2014 State of the State Address to Mississippi legislature Jan 22, 2014

    Phil Bryant: Add 'In God We Trust' to Mississippi State Seal

    I continue to believe this is the right time to stand for our beliefs--our faith, our families, and our nation. To strengthen our resolve, I have asked that we take a bold step for God and country. I have called for legislation that would change the wording on the Great Seal of the State of Mississippi to reflect our nation's motto. With your help, the seal of the State of Mississippi will, from this session forward, reflect the simple yet profound words 'In God We Trust'.
    Source: 2014 State of the State Address to Mississippi legislature Jan 22, 2014

    Chris McDaniel: Tied to Tea Party and endorsed by conservative groups

    A trio of outside groups endorsed a Mississippi Republican state legislator's primary challenge to Sen. Thad Cochran. Club for Growth PAC, the Senate Conservatives Fund and the Madison Project PAC all offered support for State Sen. Chris McDaniel, who has tied himself closely with tea party groups and announced his bid earlier in the day.

    The endorsing groups stressed that McDaniel has proven his right-wing bona fides. "Chris McDaniel is not part of the Washington establishment and he has the courage to stand up to the big spenders in both parties," the Senate Conservatives Fund executive director said.

    Cochran , mingled with about 70 donors at a reception this week at the National Republican Senatorial Committee headquarters. He suggested this summer that it might take months before he shares his plans. Asked about the attacks, Cochran's spokesman emailed: "Senator Cochran has indicated that he will determine his plans regarding the 2014 election cycle later this year."

    Source: Politico.com on 2014 Mississippi Senate debate Oct 17, 2013

    Thad Cochran: First elected in 1978; still undecided about 2014 retirement

    A trio of outside groups endorsed a Mississippi Republican state legislator's primary challenge to Sen. Thad Cochran. Club for Growth PAC, the Senate Conservatives Fund and the Madison Project PAC all offered support for State Sen. Chris McDaniel, 41, who has tied himself closely with tea party groups and announced his bid earlier in the day.

    Cochran, 75, has not said whether he will run for a seventh term next year. He has picked up his fundraising some. Cochran, who won his seat in 1978, mingled with about 70 donors at a reception this week at the National Republican Senatorial Committee headquarters, and a source in the room said he "seemed like he was running." He suggested this summer that it might take months before he shares his plans. Asked about the attacks, Cochran's spokesman emailed: "Senator Cochran has indicated that he will determine his plans regarding the 2014 election cycle later this year."

    Source: Politico.com on 2014 Mississippi Senate debate Oct 17, 2013

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