State of Hawaii Archives: on Environment


Andria Tupola: Protect environment by partnering with local orgs

We should take a proactive approach to better understanding our local ecosystem and partner with Hawaiian agricultural practitioners to bring back some of what used to protect our island and its resources. There are many local organizations that work tirelessly to protect our environment and would make great partners for our local government to learn from and better understand how we can protect it.
Source: Honolulu Civil Beat on 2022 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 3, 2020

David Ige: Strong guidelines for environmental protection

Our budget includes $3.9 million over two years for Sustainable Hawaii initiatives, to support our biosecurity plan, watershed protection and our Agricultural Loan Revolving Fund.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to Hawaii legislature Jan 22, 2019

Ron Curtis: Protect environment with common sense daily routine changes

Global warming and the environment: To the extent that we can, we need to be responsible caretakers of the `Aina without causing economic hardships for anyone. We need to implement common sense changes in our daily life routines to eliminate the creation of problems like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.
Source: 2018 Hawaii Senate campaign website RonCurtis808.com Aug 8, 2018

Andria Tupola: People must understand what environmental protections do

We cannot expect people to just automatically know that this is what I should do because it's better for the environment, we need to be actively teaching our communities, showing them why these options are not just better for our health but also better for our environment.
Source: Pacific Business News on 2018 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 31, 2018

Andria Tupola: If we take care of the land it will take care of our needs

Tupola pointed to traditional Hawaiian principles of taking care of the aina and not just taking from it. "If you don't go and take care of the commons, then you don't get to hunt, you don't get to fish," she said, describing the traditions. "But that practice has been lost. Now people take, take, take, take, and use, use, use, use, but they don't give back."

Governor Ige pointed to the state's farm to school program as an initiative implemented under his watch to support local growers by buying their produce to serve in public schools. Concerning the tension between development and the environment, Ige said, "I really think it's about balance."

"What we should do is invest in agriculture," she says. "It's a no-brainer." Tupola acknowledges that building Hawaii's agriculture industry "won't happen overnight." The state has to invest money for infrastructure, like irrigation, and identify crops that can be lucrative enough to support an industry over the long term.

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat on 2018 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 9, 2018

Andria Tupola: Tension between development & environment is about balance

Governor Ige said the state should continue to support agriculture, and he pointed to the state's farm to school program as an initiative implemented under his watch to support local growers by buying their produce to serve in public schools. Concerning the tension between development and the environment, Ige said, "I really think it's about balance."

As an example, Ige points to a mediated settlement approved by the Hawaii Water Commission, which restores water rights to Hawaiian homestead lands on Kauai. The 2017 Waimea Watershed Agreement was praised not only for providing water for farming on Department of Hawaiian Home Lands properties, but also for paving the way for a renewable energy venture involving DHHL and the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative, which supplies electricity to the island.

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat on 2018 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 9, 2018

John Carroll: Eliminate air and water pollution in every state

Q: What should the nation be doing to alleviate climate change?

JC: Every effort to eliminate air and water pollution should be made the highest priority in every state. During the 10 years that I was a state legislator, I was responsible for introducing all of the current environmental laws in effect today.

Source: Maui Time on 2016 Hawaii Senate race Jun 27, 2016

David Ige: Push Congress to spend more on Hawaii tourism

The net value of Federal spending in Hawai'i--the difference between the amount of taxes we send to Washington, D.C. and receive in spending--has declined every year under the current Governor. As Governor, I will work with our Congressional delegation to reverse this trend.
Source: 2014 Hawaii gubernatorial campaign website DavidIge.org Aug 9, 2014

David Ige: Increase funding for watersheds & against invasive species

We can have both a healthy environment and responsible economic growth through comprehensive planning that engages environmental interests, development interests, and other community interests.
Source: 2014 Hawaii gubernatorial campaign website DavidIge.org Aug 9, 2014

Brian Schatz: Received perfect score from League of Conservation Voters

The League of Conservation Voters (LCV) launched advertisements in Hawaii to highlight incumbent Sen. Brian Schatz' (D) environmental record in the primary race for his Senate seat. Schatz has backed a national carbon tax and the Environmental Protection Agency's carbon emissions limits for power plants, and earned a rare perfect score on LCV's environmental scorecard last year.

"Hawaii has a special relationship with nature and our climate," the voiceover in the television ad says. "Climate change threatens our way of life. It's why Brian Schatz is holding corporate polluters that cause it accountable, taking strong action to reduce carbon pollution."

LCV is spending about $380,000 on the campaign. LCV's senior vice president said that Schatz is "tirelessly leading the fight to halt the climate change that will devastate Hawaii and is fighting to and hold corporate polluters accountable by requiring them to slash their emissions."

Source: The Hill weblog: AdWatch on 2014 Hawaii Senate race Jul 25, 2014

Neil Abercrombie: Food labeling good, but not at expense of small businesses

Q: Where do you stand on labeling of genetically engineered food and pesticide regulation? Are these public safety issues, or are the dangers exaggerated?

ABERCROMBIE: It's about balance. I fully support consumers' right to know what's in their food. However, we must be sure that this effort meets legal and constitutional requirements and does not come at the expense of small businesses. Small retailers, distributors, and food manufacturers should not be penalized by food labeling requirements. That's why I'm working with my good friend Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin to learn from his state's experience of having passed one of the first laws in the country on this issue. I'm also looking to the federal government for guidance and leadership on this issue.

IGE: I support the right to know what is in our food, but labeling should be addressed at the federal, not the state level, so that Hawaii's farmers, retailers and consumers are not subject to additional costs.

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat Q&A on 2014 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 23, 2014

David Ige: Right to know what is in our food, via federal labeling

Q: Where do you stand on labeling of genetically engineered food and pesticide regulation? Are these public safety issues, or are the dangers exaggerated?

A: I support the right to know what is in our food, but labeling should be addressed at the federal, not the state level, so that Hawaii's farmers, retailers and consumers are not subject to additional costs. I will urge our congressional members to support federal legislation in this area. There are no valid scientific studies that show any difference between genetically modified and naturally grown food. State enforcement is needed to properly enforce regulations on pesticide use.

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat Q&A on 2014 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 11, 2014

David Ige: Protect Hawaii's fragile resources for future generations

Q: There is a desire to grow the economy through new development yet also a need to protect our limited environmental resources. How would you balance these competing interests?

A: Our state has not done enough to protect Hawaii's fragile natural and cultural resources for future generations. We can have both responsible economic growth and a healthy environment by comprehensively planning for competing land use needs. I'll continue to protect Hawaii from invasive species and irresponsible development. My goal is to find a balance between creating new housing and job opportunities while preserving our environment.

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat Q&A on 2014 Hawaii gubernatorial race Jul 11, 2014

Brian Schatz: Genetically modified foods aren't unhealthy

Hanabusa said she does not believe genetically modified foods are unhealthy and said she stands with farmers and scientists on the issue. In a widening policy split, she said Schatz's support for state and county home rule on GMO regulation would not work.

"You cannot have potentially four different sets of legislation or statutes to govern what can be grown by our farmers," she said. "That would, in and of itself, I believe, kill agriculture, because how can they survive if they have one set of rules in one area, and another. And as someone who wants to be the United States senator, or is the United States senator, look at it in terms of the United States Constitution--supremacy clause and commerce clause."

Hanabusa, however, said the states, and not the federal government, should determine whether marijuana should be legalized.

Source: Honolulu Star Advertiser on 2014 Hawaii Senate race Jul 8, 2014

Colleen Hanabusa: Genetically modified foods aren't unhealthy

Hanabusa said she does not believe genetically modified foods are unhealthy and said she stands with farmers and scientists on the issue. In a widening policy split, she said Schatz's support for state and county home rule on GMO regulation would not work.

"You cannot have potentially four different sets of legislation or statutes to govern what can be grown by our farmers," she said. "That would, in and of itself, I believe, kill agriculture, because how can they survive if they have one set of rules in one area, and another. And as someone who wants to be the United States senator, or is the United States senator, look at it in terms of the United States Constitution--supremacy clause and commerce clause."

Hanabusa, however, said the states, and not the federal government, should determine whether marijuana should be legalized.

Source: Honolulu Star Advertiser on 2014 Hawaii Senate race Jul 8, 2014

Charles Djou: Advocated for recycling and trash services on City Council

Urban and dense Honolulu forces its children to walk home from school on broken sidewalks. It was refreshing a few weekends ago spending the day with the Hawaii Bicycling League discussing government reform and safe streets at TEDx Honolulu. It's so nice to know others feel as strongly as you. If only our government leaders addressed structural problems the way they funneled pork projects like building a massive and widely unpopular rail system. I saw the frustration of my friend Charles Djou when he served on the city council as he advocated for and worked for better recycling and trash services. Fixing problems was real to him and his attempts in public service were often stifled by good intentioned politicians that promoted clumsy poor policy.
Source: Business Week on 2014 Hawaii Governor race Dec 9, 2013

Ed Case: Diversify tourism to include educational & eco-tourism

Mazie Hirono focused on her Visit the USA bill which would ease visa requirements making it easier for the Chinese to spend their money here in Hawaii. Democrat opponent Ed Case agreed it's a good idea but claims he's better suited to get it passed. He criticized Hirono for taking so long to introduce it and getting relatively few in congress to support it. "She didn't do anything for almost five years so from my perspective this is something she did because she is running for the Senate not because she was focusing on tourism," said Case. "People need a senator that works all six years not just in an election year and that's what I will do."

Case said he would diversify tourism because Hawaii is not just about Waikiki and beaches." People want constant change, they want some things about Hawaii but they want agricultural tourism, they want eco tourism, they want scientific tourism, educational tourism and these can all occur throughout this state," said Case.

Source: Hawaii News Now coverage of 2012 Hawaii Senate debate May 30, 2012

Mazie Hirono: Visit the USA Bill: attract 300,000 Chinese by easier visas

Mazie Hirono focused the majority of her comments on her Visit the USA bill which would ease visa requirements making it easier for the Chinese to spend their money here in Hawaii. "China, now that is a huge market: 54 million Chinese are traveling all across the world, fewer than a million of them come to our country. Why? Because our visa process is so difficult," said Hirono. "We can attract some 300,000 Chinese visitors, $600 million spent in our economy, creating 6,000 jobs."

Opponent Ed Case agreed it's a good idea but claims he's better suited to get it passed. He criticized Hirono for taking so long to introduce it and getting relatively few in congress to support it. Hirono responded saying there is a lot going on. "Right now there is an election that we need to get through but it's going to have bipartisan support," said Hirono.

Source: Hawaii News Now coverage of 2012 Hawaii Senate debate May 30, 2012

Neil Abercrombie: New Day Work Projects: transit-oriented development

I will convene a group of experts and University officials to consider the future of sports & the future of development on Oahu to make a definitive decision on Aloha Stadium and any future stadium we might build. Other than maintenance related to health and safety, I will divert all other capital improvement dollars for Aloha Stadium to other projects. Right now, multimillion dollar plans to extend the life of Aloha Stadium by 20 years could take 40 years to implement. It is time to reprioritize. The Ne Day Work Projects will look to the future and what our community and economy will look like decades from now. For example, as Honolulu moves on its transit plans, the state will actively support attractive, sustainable transit-oriented redevelopment. The legislature has proposals on these concepts, including looking at density rights and other zoning initiatives. I look forward to participating in the discussion and moving quickly. The people of Hawaii are going to get to work and build our future.
Source: 2011 Hawaii State of the State Address Jan 24, 2011

Duke Aiona: Make Hawai'i the greenest place on Earth

Q: Do you support state funding for open space preservation?

A: Yes.

Aiona adds, "I'm committed to the long-term vision of making Hawai'i the greenest place on Earth and doing it in a way that's affordable for all of our citizens.

Source: Hawaii Gubernatorial Election 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Benjamin Cayetano: Balance growth against environmental protection

Economic growth should never come at the expense of our natural environment. I propose a long-range analysis of our State’s carrying capacity to help evaluate our State’s ability to endure growth. We will look at whether the State’s infrastructure & our natural resources can survive such growth without being damaged. The results of this analysis will be used to create a strategic plan to make sure we balance our economic interests in maintaining tourism with our duty to protect our natural environment.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to Hawaii Legislature Jan 22, 2001

Benjamin Cayetano: $22M to improve state parks

Our parks system needs our attention now. We must repair worn facilities, upgrade older ones, and otherwise beautify these parks. I am proposing spending $22 million in capital improvements to repair and maintain our State parks. For the long-term care of our parks, I am proposing that half the money from the hotel room tax that does not go for marketing be used to improve and protect the wonders of our State parks system.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to Hawaii Legislature Jan 22, 2001

  • The above quotations are from State of Hawaii Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Environment.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2020 Presidential contenders on Environment:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: submit@OnTheIssues.org
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Jan 28, 2021