State of Mississippi secondary Archives: on Principles & Values


Mike Espy: Jungle primary on Nov. 6; runoff election on Nov. 27

Mike Espy is running for the runoff--the sort of election that some African Americans have said for years is designed to keep them from winning.

The runoff is baked into Espy's campaign strategy against Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith and conservative firebrand Chris McDaniel, Republicans who he'll face in a so-called "jungle" primary special election Nov. 6 to finish the final two years of GOP Sen. Thad Cochran's six-year term. Cochran retired in April citing health reasons, and Hyde-Smith was named to replace him until the election determined a successor. If none of the candidates receive 50 percent of the vote on Nov. 6, the top two finishers will square off in a Nov. 27 runoff.

The thinking about runoffs goes like this: A black candidate in the South could easily win a multi-candidate primary, as long as they get most of the black vote, which could be as high as the mid-to-low 30s. But in a one-on-one contest, the potential to add to that total is diminished.

Source: McClatchyDC.com on 2018 MS Senate special election Sep 12, 2018

Mike Espy: Jungle primary on Nov. 6; runoff election on Nov. 27

Mike Espy is running for the runoff--the sort of election that some African Americans have said for years is designed to keep them from winning.

The runoff is baked into Espy's campaign strategy against Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith and conservative firebrand Chris McDaniel, Republicans who he'll face in a so-called "jungle" primary special election Nov. 6 to finish the final two years of GOP Sen. Thad Cochran's six-year term. Cochran retired in April citing health reasons, and Hyde-Smith was named to replace him until the election determined a successor. If none of the candidates receive 50 percent of the vote on Nov. 6, the top two finishers will square off in a Nov. 27 runoff.

The thinking about runoffs goes like this: A black candidate in the South could easily win a multi-candidate primary, as long as they get most of the black vote, which could be as high as the mid-to-low 30s. But in a one-on-one contest, the potential to add to that total is diminished.

Source: McClatchyDC.com on 2018 MS Senate Special Election Sep 12, 2018

Rev. Jesse Jackson: Abolish runoff elections; they hurt black candidates

Mississippi Democrat Mike Espy is running for the runoff--the sort of election that some African Americans have said for years is designed to keep them from winning.

The thinking about runoffs goes like this: A black candidate in the South could easily win a multi-candidate primary, as long as they get most of the black vote, which could be as high as the mid-to-low 30s. But in a one-on-one contest, the potential to add to that total is diminished.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, who made the abolishing runoffs a cornerstone of his unsuccessful 1984 Democratic presidential campaign, said "Historically, and in many instances today, whites support white candidate regardless of how qualified an African-American candidate is.

"Even if Mike Espy does make it to the runoff in Mississippi it is unlikely that he will win the runoff--whatever runoff system is used in Mississippi" despite having the highest percentage of African-American residents in the country at 37 percent, Jackson said.

Source: McClatchyDC.com on 2018 MS Senate special election Sep 12, 2018

Cindy Hyde-Smith: Follows Trump principles to "make America great again"

Cindy Hyde-Smith, state commissioner of agriculture and commerce, was appointed by the governor to fill in for the rest of the year the seat vacated by Sen. Cochran. "I pledge to serve with honor and respect. I want to thank Senator Cochran for his leadership, dedication and service to our state. I'm also looking forward to working with President Trump and everyone else who believes in the policies and principles that are making America great again," she said at a press conference.
Source: Washington Times on 2018 MS Senate Special Election Mar 21, 2018

Robert Gray: Confederate flag shouldn't be associated with state flag

When it comes to our state flag, Gray says it hurts the state economically, "The people that want it, can wave it all they want," Gray said, "but it can't be our state flag. It's bad for business."
Source: 2015 MS gubernatorial campaign website governorbryant.com Aug 7, 2015

Roger Wicker: OpEd: Ties Musgrove to Obama to demonstrate liberal record

Ronnie Musgrove failed to mention Barack Obama by name when asked “For whom will you vote for President, and why?” Musgrove’s statement that he would support the nominee of his Party would have been perfectly acceptable during the Primary season, but seemed to be a point of embarrassment for him just weeks before the general election.

Wicker’s ability to tie the liberal record of Obama to Musgrove that was the deciding difference in the debate. By bringing up the issue of Judicial appointments as they might affect the Second Amendment as well as abortion and traditional marriage, Wicker demonstrated the continuing difficulty of any Democrat in a statewide election, regardless of how conservative they might be.

Source: Pike County Times on 2008 MS Senate Debate Oct 3, 2008

Ronnie Musgrove: OpEd: Distancing himself from Obama

Ronnie Musgrove failed to mention Barack Obama by name when asked “For whom will you vote for President, and why?” Musgrove’s statement that he would support the nominee of his Party would have been perfectly acceptable during the Primary season, but seemed to be a point of embarrassment for him just weeks before the general election.

Wicker’s ability to tie the liberal record of Obama to Musgrove that was the deciding difference in the debate. By bringing up the issue of Judicial appointments as they might affect the Second Amendment as well as abortion and traditional marriage, Wicker demonstrated the continuing difficulty of any Democrat in a statewide election, regardless of how conservative they might be.

Source: Pike County Times on 2008 MS Senate Debate Oct 3, 2008

Mike Espy: Emulate Clinton's style, comfortable in mixed-race crowds

Q: Did the Congressional Black Caucus criticize your early support of Bill Clinton?

A: Yes. I wanted to be known as President Clinton's best friend in the Black Caucus. They used me a lot, during the campaign, to answer charges. The Sister Souljah thing was one [where Jesse Jackson criticized Clinton on race].

Q: What was Bill Clinton's relationship with Jesse Jackson?

A: Jesse was used to being the emissary for white politicians in the black community, and Bill didn't need that. He could go himself. Bill operated in a world that was truly diverse, where he was comfortable, and Jesse operated in a world that was a bit limited. He was the foremost black leader, and Bill wanted to be the foremost leader. That's where they began to diverge, and it was resented in some ways. I tend to follow Bill Clinton's style of leadership, where you're comfortable in all crowds, where you don't compromise your principles, but you try to explain what you did. That's how I try to pattern myself.

Source: MillerCenter.org on 2018 MS Senate Special Election May 15, 2006

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